In the late 1890s/early 1900s, two hybrids were born in Chicago, USA, followed 2 years later by three sets of twin cubs born at a zoo in Hamburg, Germany from a puma father and leopard mother. Carl Hagenbeck apparently bred several litters of puma x leopard hybrids in 1898 at the suggestion of a menagerie owner in Britain; this was possibly Lord Rothschild (as one of the hybrids is preserved in his museum) who may have heard of the two hybrid cubs bred in Chicago in 1896 and suggested Hagenbeck reproduced the pairing.
I've adopted a cat that was dumped under our hedge. She is very skinny but is gaining weight in the week I've had her. She drinks about half a cup of water daily and breathes very rapidly even when resting. Is it normal for a cat that had been so skinny and is now gaining weight to have such rapid breathing? I'm concerned having been so starved her organs may have been affected, she is quite young. Otherwise she appears very content, alert and relaxed. Your thoughts would be appreciated.
Do your research. Bengals, Savannahs and many other hybrids even removed from the original crosses can be bad bad bad cats to have. Why risk a hybrid wild animal when you can get domestics that look just as amazing? Example: Ocicat; Egyptian Mau; if you are looking for wild looking cats. Classic Bombay cats look like black panthers; pixie bobs (some say are hybrids but its bunk) and highlanders are wild looking cats but not wild in the slightest. Many were made from regular domestic crosses with purebreds and/or landrace natural breeds etc. Look around, use wikipedia. Check out the cat fancy sites. There are domestics for everyone. Most are cheaper too. Wild animals/hybrids are like leaving a loaded pistol on your computer desk. You just never know for sure what can happen. Domestics can be unpredictable in the right circumstances, why add in a wild/hybrid factor and possibly endanger people and other pets around you? Would you want to carry that guilt the rest of your life?
A stray cat showed up at my house a couple days ago. She is very thin and I've started her on small throughout the day. She is eating, drinking, voiding, and stooling okay. Eyes, ears, and nose are all clear. The only major thing I've noticed is rapid breathing when purring or stress (loud noises make her skittish). I have pets of my own and really cannot afford a costly vet visit, and our local shelter and a rescue are overwhelmed with companion animals at this time. I've started her on antibiotics and am keeping her isolated from my own pets. My daughter has asthma and this looks very similar. Any advice? I've found out that her previous owner passed away and a neighbour tried to bring her to her house, the cat bolted and they couldn't find her, 3 weeks later she showed up at my place. She is a spayed 5 year old female who was up to date on shots.
Thank you for your email. I do think that there might be more going on than stress, and kittens are prone to infectious diseases. If you don't trust that veterinarian that you saw, it would be a good idea to find a second opinion, even if you have to travel a bit to do so, as he could have a problem that needs to be treated. You can also call your veterinarian, let them know that he isn't getting better, and see if they have any other recommendations for him.

Calico: Separate solid blocks of color, which must include red (orange), black, and white. They also may have blocks of tabby pattern, which produces an extremely colorful and beautiful cat. Dilute calicos, have the same separate blocks of color, only the colors are "diluted," i.e. "faded" shades of the original, which gives them an ethereal appearance. A dilute calico will have pale orange or buff for the red, and gray (or "blue") for the black.
If Chester’s respiratory rate is over 100 breaths per minute you should visit your Veterinarian immediate for an examination since this is well over physiological range; infections, anaemia, allergies, congenital anomalies, foreign objects, fluid, parasites among other causes may be the underlying cause. I cannot give you any at home advice in a case this severe except to visit a Veterinarian for a thorough examination. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
Chester was taken in last night for an abscess removal surgery on his neck. I got him back this morning and he is having trouble using his litter box. are there any suggestions to help him use it? also, the vet prescribed 2 antibiotics but no pain reliever for chester. he has a drain in his face and i could only imagine how painful it will be for the next few days until he gets it removed. i was told that chester was given a pain medication shot. how long is this supposed to last? it doesn't seem humane to let him go back home without the necessary pain relief medication. In addition, his breathing is quite fast. is that normal for a post abscess removal surgery?
Without examining Kujo it is difficult to say specifically what the cause for panting is; sometimes there may be side effects from vaccines and other treatments but are self limiting and resolve themselves pretty quickly without veterinary intervention. However, if Kujo is struggling to breathe or there is no improvement you should return to your Veterinarian to be on the safe side. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
The goal of breeding the Serengeti Cat is to produce a cat that resembles the wild Serval but does not contain any Serval bloodline. The first Serengeti Cat was bred by Karen Sausman in 1994 by crossing a Bengal and an Oriental Shorthair. This "foundation cat" and its progeny have been bred with many other types of cats to improve the breed—but no Servals. However, its lineage does include the Asian Leopard Cat whose genes contributed to its Bengal Cat ancestor. Serengeti Cats have long ears and long legs like a Serval, and a neck that does not taper where it meets the head. They are agile, active, and vocal. TICA classifies this cat as an advanced new breed.
We have a 12 year old cat that is breathing hard and rapidly. about 6 weeks ago he got stepped on and the breathing rapid started about 2 days later. We took him to the vet. They did xrays and blood work. Said his back was bruised and gave him antibotics, steroid shot, and pain meds. He was fine for about 3 weeks then started breathing hard again. This time we took him back they said he had a cats nail stuck in his neck. Gave him a steroid shot and he was fine for 2 weeks. Took him back 3rd time and they gave him a steroid shot.This time it didnt help. Took him to a different vet. They looked at his blood work and took xrays. Said he either had cancer or fungus on his lungs. They were swolen. He is on his second week of antibotics and anti-fugal meds. Really breathing hard but not panting. Not sure if he's suffering or how to tell.
Cat fanciers may think that Russian Blues only have blue coating, but this isn’t always the case. In other cat associations such as New Zealand and Australia, the term “Russians” can be applied to black and white varieties, alongside the traditional blues. Even the U.S. Cat Fanciers Association and TICA allows black-colored Russians or Russian Whites into play in provisional cases.
Hello so my cat is around 8 years old and is a outdoor cat. He came in today and is very low energy sitting in the middle of my room on the floor which is very unusual for him. He is breathing very rapidly, and aggressively. He sometimes makes a little noise out of his mouth. So I don’t know if this is something small and I shouldn’t worry, but this is my first day of seeing this symptoms so if it continues then I’ll go see a vet.

While the Russian Blue loves your company, he is capable of entertaining himself during the day while you are at work. Unlike some active, intelligent breeds, he is not destructive but moves through the house with the lithe grace of a Russian ballerina. When you are at home, his subtle sense of humor and manual dexterity will never fail to entertain. Just make sure you laugh with him, not at him. He has a strong sense of self-worth and doesn’t like being made fun of.
A cat shouldn’t be breathing more than around 40 breaths per minute when at rest, if her breathing is above this rate then it may be indicative of something going on. An increase in breathing may be due to infections, heart disease, cancer, pleural effusion, allergies among other causes; given Smudge’s age, I would have your Veterinarian take a look at her to be on the safe side. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
Historians and cat lovers in Scandinavia and England worked tirelessly to map out a bloodline foundation for the cat breed. Records show that the first Archangel Blue appeared in 1875 to compete against similar blue breeds at the London Crystal Palace. One newspaper said that the Archangel was “particularly furry”, “very handsome” and “has similarities to that of the wild grey rabbit”. Before long, word was spreading around about the Russian Blue.
Those animals were then bred indiscriminately, and many purposely inbred for traits such as white coats, tiny size, and docile (read retarded) temperament. None of the exotic cats in wild hands can be traced back to the wild, other than local cats, cougars and bobcats, who may have been snatched from the wild in the U.S. For that reason they can never be bred for introduction back to the wild.
The Russian Blue can spend hours amusing itself and does not mind an awful lot if it is left at home alone for the day, but it will be very happy to see you when you do arrive. This cat makes for an excellent companion, constantly following its owners about, and generally preferring one human above all others in the family. It should be added that the Russian Blue gets along with most everyone, including children. Their love of human company extends to impishly clowning to help calm a crying baby, and showing sympathy when their people get the blues by patting the face of the person.

My cat seems to have rapid breathing, I can see her stomach area rising and falling as she sleeps. I tried to take her breathing rate and got 60-65 per minute. She is grooming herself more than usual. She has always been skittish, her eating is normal, and she has had normal bladder and bowel functions. I have a hard time getting her into a carrier so I do not take her to the vet often. I am in an area that is getting prepared for a powerful nor'easter, so I can't get her to a vet for a few days. Should I be worried? What can I do?
Thank you for your email. I do think that there might be more going on than stress, and kittens are prone to infectious diseases. If you don't trust that veterinarian that you saw, it would be a good idea to find a second opinion, even if you have to travel a bit to do so, as he could have a problem that needs to be treated. You can also call your veterinarian, let them know that he isn't getting better, and see if they have any other recommendations for him.
Black grizzled tabbies are unique to the Chausie breed among domestic cats. The grizzled pattern comes from the jungle cat; it is never found in domestic cats unless they have F. chaus ancestors.[8] The kittens are often born completely black, although occasionally they may have a bit of light colored fur on the chin or neck at birth. As the kittens get older, they begin to look more and more like tabbies. However, they are tabbies with black on black markings. That is, the background color is a sort of dark brownish black, and the markings, such as the mid-line stripe on the spine, are pure black. In addition, alternating bands of off-white appear on individual hairs in the background color. The bands are along the middle of each hair. The root of each hair is mousie gray, while the tip of each hair is black. The off-white banding or "ticking" usually appears first on the neck, chin, and belly, as well as the insides of the ears. Later, the grizzling will often extend up the sides from belly to almost the spine. In the most heavily grizzled cats, the grizzling extends over the back of the neck, on the face, and even on the legs and tail. Usually the grizzling is complete by age 3 years. The effect in the best cats is spectacular. Grizzling does have a wide range of expression, however, and some cats never have more than a few banded hairs in the ears or in one spot on the belly, occasionally not even that.

My kitten has been in and out of the vet's office and is on strong antibiotics and oxygen since Oct. 26 until now and he is getting better for a few days and he is right back at it. He has spent a lot of time at the vet and the bill is getting high. He is home and I am giving him the antibiotics and oxygen at home and it does not seem to be helping here. But at the vet he does good after a day or two. How much oxygen do I give him at home and how often?


Little is known about the origin of the Russian Blue breed, though stories are legendary. Many believe the Russian Blue is a natural breed originating from the Archangel Isles in northern Russia, where the long winters developed a cat with a dense, plush coat. Rumors also abound that the Russian Blue breed descended from the cats kept by the Russian Czars. Assuming the Russian Blue did migrate from northern Russia, it was likely via ship to England and northern Europe in the mid 1860s.
This is a well-behaved cat that is easy to train. Or, rather, it easily trains its people. It enjoys a good game of fetch and will keep the game going longer than you may have time for, and you will make time because the Russian Blue is known for actually appearing hurt when it has been ignored. Elegant, and reserved, this cat is also very playful, and loves to chase after toys or sunbeams.
Sorry to hear your kitty is scratching like that! Does he show any signs of skin infections, fleas, mites, wounds from other cats? The cone could have stressed him further, yes, if he was scratching already because of tension/anxiety. Open sores can get infected, especially when left untreated and scratched further. We would recommend taking your kitty to the vet for a diagnosis. They will be able to provide you the advice and medication your kitty might need. Best wishes!
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