Cat sleeping all day which isn't like him at all. Once in awhile has asthma type cough gag hairball, once in awhile has tounge out and short shallow breaths. Lays long with body and neck stretched once in awhile. now he's been curled up in ball n won't move really except to lay down again or stretch. He's recently caught a mouse and bird. And month ago was sprayed in face area by a skunk. And just yesterday I noticed his back class are all split n frayed worn down.

I was under the impression that a Bobcat (meaning the wild kind) would be thinking dinner if he ran across a domestic cat. Bobcats are also so much bigger than a normal housecat. I can't imagine them breeding. Do they really breed in the "wild?" I got to see a bobcat closeup at a cat rescue (the owner used to do wildlife rescue and this guy couldn't go back to the wild) and I just can't imagine him wanting to breed with a domestic cat, as opposed to eating it.
What's wrong with my poor gravy? My cat Gravy has become extremely affectionate today and has followed me outside 3x, where he never ever goes! He's following me like a shadow and meowing at me more than normal. He doesn't seem to be in any pain, but his breathing and change of demeanor have me concerned. He's breathing fairly rapidly thru his nose, and he is moving his tail a lot also acting maybe as if he is worried?
The respiration rate is very high, but without an examination I cannot give you any recommendations; you should continue to monitor Teddy for the time being and keep in contact with your regular Veterinarian. If money is tight, there are nonprofit organisations which may be able to help with the cost of veterinary care, see link below. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM www.dogingtonpost.com/need-help-with-vet-bills-or-pet-food-there-are-resources-available/

Big cats spawn on grass blocks at light levels of 9 or more in groups of up to 4. Some cats only spawn in certain biomes: leopards spawn in jungles, forests and forest variants; lions, panthers and tigers spawn in plains and forests; and snow leopards spawn in cold biomes. Lions and tigers also spawn more frequently than panthers. There is a 1/20 chance for a white lion, white lioness or white tiger to spawn.

A tigon is a hybrid cross between a male tiger (Panthera tigris) and a female lion (Panthera leo). Thus, it has parents with the same genus but of different species. The tigon is not currently as common as the converse hybrid, the liger.The tigon’s genome includes genetic components of both parents. Tigons can exhibit visible characteristics from both parents: they can have both spots from the mother (lions carry genes for spots—lion cubs are spotted and some adults retain faint markings) and stripes from the father. Any mane that a male tigon may have will appear shorter and less noticeable than a lion’s mane and is closer in type to the ruff of a male tiger. It is a common misconception that tigons are smaller than lions or tigers. They do not exceed the size of their parent species because they inherit growth-inhibitory genes from the lioness mother, but they do not exhibit any kind of dwarfism or miniaturization; they often weigh around 180 kilograms (400 lb).

If a cat’s resting respiratory rate exceeds 40 breaths per minute you should visit your Veterinarian; there are many causes for an increase in respiratory rate which may include infections, pain, heart disease, liver disease, parasites among many other conditions. Whilst you should keep an eye on her, I would still recommend visiting a Veterinarian sooner rather than later to be on the safe side. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
In the late 1890s/early 1900s, two hybrids were born in Chicago, USA, followed 2 years later by three sets of twin cubs born at a zoo in Hamburg, Germany from a puma father and leopard mother. Carl Hagenbeck apparently bred several litters of puma x leopard hybrids in 1898 at the suggestion of a menagerie owner in Britain; this was possibly Lord Rothschild (as one of the hybrids is preserved in his museum) who may have heard of the two hybrid cubs bred in Chicago in 1896 and suggested Hagenbeck reproduced the pairing.
Without knowing more about Cindy, the type of cancer and location, and her history, it isn't possible for me to comment on what might be happening to her now. It would be best to call your veterinarian, as they have seen her and know her history, and let them know what is going on. They'll be able to guide you in any possible treatments for her. I hope that she is okay.
A few people experimented with breeding F. chaus to F. s. catus in the late 1960s and 1970s. Their intention was to provide a sensible alternative to keeping non-domestic cats as pets. However, the Chausie breed did not truly begin until the 1990s, when a dedicated group of breeders named the breed "Chausie" (after Felis chaus) and developed a planned breeding program and goals.[4] These breeders asked for and received registration status from TICA in 1995. The breed worked its way through the New Breed Class from May 2001 through April 2013, and became TICA's newest Championship breed on May 1, 2013.[1] Chausies are now being bred in both North America and Europe. The breed has begun the new breed recognition process in the World Cat Federation (WCF).
Adding to the captivating physical qualities of this breed is the eye color. The eyes are yellow while the Russian Blue is a kitten, and by four months there is a bright green ring around the pupil. As the cat matures, the eye color graduates into a bright, vivid green, aesthetically intensifying the already remarkable blue-silver coloring of the cat. The eyes are wide set and round, and only slightly slanted at the upper corners, giving the Russian Blue a sweet expression that matches well with its gentle temperament.
The Russian Blue stands out for his coat color. To the uninformed, he might look gray, but in cat show terms he is an even, bright blue with silver-tipped hairs that make him seem to glisten. Some Russian Blue kittens are born with “ghost stripes,” a reminder of the tabby gene that all cats carry, even if it isn’t expressed in their coat, but these generally fade, leaving the cat with the solid blue coat of maturity.
The PIxiebob breed began as a result of natural mating. Carol Ann Brewer observed bob-tailed cats in the Cascade Mountains of Washington state. She adopted one of these cats in 1985, who then mated with a neighbor's cat. She obtained more of the "legend cats," bob-tailed local cats that somewhat resembled bobcats, and are thought to be results of natural matings between bobcats and domestic cats, although no proof exists. Pixiebobs are tall cats with back legs slightly longer than the front legs. They have thick double coats that may be short or long. Breed standards allow for up to seven toes in a PIxiebob, the only championship breed allowing for polydactly. Pixiebobs gained championship status with the TICA in 1998. Although Pixiebobs are often stone-faced like a wild cat, they are loyal and make good pets.
Rapid breathing (tachypnea) is a respiratory disorder characterised by abnormal breathing that is rapid and shallow.  It is caused by a reduced level of oxygen, mechanical disorders (where the lungs aren’t able to expand as they should, usually due to a build-up of fluid in or around the lungs), and physiological disorders in which the cat’s respiratory centre in the brain is over stimulated.
Russian Blues have a tolerant nature toward children who treat them kindly and respectfully. They will even put up with the clumsy pats given by toddlers, as if they recognize that no harm is meant, and if necessary they will walk away or climb out of reach to escape being bonked on the head. That said, the patient and gentle Russian Blue should always be protected from rough treatment, so always supervise very young children when they want to pet the cat.
My cat, Arwen, just came out to the living room limping badly with her front right leg kinda knuckling over. The leg and paw is cool to the touch in comparison to the rest of her body and her shoulder blade is just flat. I pinched her toes a little and there was no reaction. She's also breathing kind of shallow and fast with it seems like she's breathing from her stomach not her chest. She is crying a little bit but not when we touch the leg, onky when she tries to move around while laying down.

There are many different causes for rapid breathing in cats which may include pain, respiratory infection, heart failure among other causes. Without an examination and thorough auscultation of the chest, I cannot say what the cause is or the best course of treatment; anytime resting respiratory rate is over 40 breaths per minute, you should visit your Veterinarian as soon as possible. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM


There are various different causes for rapid breathing which may include infections, pain, heart disorders, dehydration among other causes; a cat’s respiration should be below 30 breaths per minute when at rest but if it is significantly above this rate at rest I would suggest visiting your Veterinarian for an examination to determine a cause. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
The CFA describes the Foreign Blue as “having a medium-sized, smooth wedge for a head with a muzzle that’s short and blunt.” The flatness of the head and its wedge-shaped appearance can be likened to that of a cobra. At the head protrudes wide ears having a pointed tip. The eyes are wide-set and has a bright green tint. Overall, the eyes give the Foreign Blue a sweet expression that perfectly matches the breed’s outstandingly gentle temperament.
My cat is recovering from having a tumor taken off of his neck. He is not thriving and today i found that he has blood in his urine. He is also breathing in short bursts. The doc said unless he seems very uncomfortable, it can wait till tomorrow, MOnday. I want the cat to see his usual vet, instead of taking him to emergency. What would you do? I don’t want him to suffer, so i gave him some pain meds.
Standard tests include a complete blood count, biochemical profile, and urine analysis. These will help your veterinarian to determine if your cat has an infection or a low red blood cell count. They will also show whether your cat's internal organs are functioning normally. Your veterinarian will also draw a sample of blood to test the amount of oxygen and carbon dioxide in your cat's blood. This will help to determine how severe your cat's breathing difficulty is and whether the problem is in the lungs or somewhere else in the chest. Your veterinarian may also draw blood for a heartworm test. Other diagnostic tools that may be used are X-ray and ultrasound images of the chest, both to examine for an enlarged heart that can lead to heart failure, and to see if the lungs appear normal. The internal structure of the abdomen may also be examined using this method. If there appears to be an accumulation of fluid in the chest, lungs or belly, some of that fluid will be drawn off for analysis.
Sounds like extra fluid. My feline leukemia positive cat was belly breathing about 50 times a minute. I rushed him to the vet who said he had a hemo thorax and removed 200ml frothy blood. He had a tumor that was leaking and compressing lungs. He layed stretched out or up on his elbows. If your cat is belly breathing and breathing upwards of >30 minute-run to the vet! Sadly I put my baby to sleep that day. I had another cat with CHF (congestive heart failure) was treatable with meds. SHe lived a year.
My 8 months old male cat is an outdoor cat and these days he started going outside the house fence for the first time( following my older cat) Today started raining and he came all dirty and wet and freezing. I immediately coverd him in a blanket and he’s been sleeping all day and not eating. He looks very tired and everytime I try to wake him he barely raises his head and also sometimes starts breathing very fast. Has he possibly cought a cold or maybe got injured ?? Help please 😩
My cat just suddenly started breathing very fast, panting with her mouth open, and twitching. She got very week short after, in able to walk, with an extremely fast heart rate. She stumbled to get her self to an is played corner where i left her to calm down with her babies and the Window opened to help her get more oxygen. She is a first time mother of four kittens that are about 5 weeks old, and im scared to death that she might be really sick. She seamed to have called down a bit, but she still seams extremely week and gets tired fast. Has trouble walking and her appetite seams to have gone down dramatically. I want to take her to a vet but I am studying abroad in jordan and there are basically no animal hospitals here, but there are veterinarians. Is there any recomended medications or something i can do to help her get better?
The Maine Coon, one of the oldest in North America, was first discovered in Maine, where it is the official state feline. According to the International Cat Association (TICA), they are known and liked for their intelligence, friendliness and good-natured goofiness. (Fetch? Heck yeah!) They prefer to hang with their people versus being coddled by them.
Thank you for your email. Unfortunately, without examining Bella, I'm not sure if she is having a problem or not. If her behavior seems off, and her breathing is more rapid, it is worth paying attention to, and if you can get her in to see your veteirnarian before the storm hits tomorrow it would probably be a good idea, to make sure she is okay. I hope that all goes well for her!
Rapid breathing (tachypnea) is a respiratory disorder characterised by abnormal breathing that is rapid and shallow.  It is caused by a reduced level of oxygen, mechanical disorders (where the lungs aren’t able to expand as they should, usually due to a build-up of fluid in or around the lungs), and physiological disorders in which the cat’s respiratory centre in the brain is over stimulated.
Tabbies: Tabby cats constitute the oldest and most common pattern seen and are one of the most popular. They are easily differentiated by their stripes, whorls, and spots ( the latter generally found on their tummies). Striped tabbies are often referred to as "tiger," for obvious reasons. They are also known as "mackerel tabbies." The round bulls-eye marking on the sides of a tabby identifies it as a "classic" tabby. While spotted tabbies sometimes crop up in "barn cats," they are also found in breeds, such as the Ocicat and the American Bobtail. Tabbies may also wear white "accessories," such as a bib, vest, or "boots." Thus, they could be described as "tabby with white."
We took her to the vet and because of her age we declined to have any lab work performed. The vet said we can make her comfortable with some meds to increase her appetite. They worked at first, but now she will only eat treats daily. She is breathing very heavily. She seems to want attention and to be around us. Not sure what to do a this point. She does not seem to be in pain. We love her dearly but don want to keep her alive if she is suffering.
Origin: The exact country of origin is unknown but the Russian Blue first appeared in cat shows in London. Though, it is widely believed that the breed is most likely from Russia because their thick double coat suggests they had been well adapted to living in very cold climates. The common story is that British sailors fell in love with this breed of cat on their travels and brought them home from the White Sea port town of Archangel. In 1871, the blue coated cat first made its appearance in a cat show at the Crystal Palace in London.
Russian Blues have a tolerant nature toward children who treat them kindly and respectfully. They will even put up with the clumsy pats given by toddlers, as if they recognize that no harm is meant, and if necessary they will walk away or climb out of reach to escape being bonked on the head. That said, the patient and gentle Russian Blue should always be protected from rough treatment, so always supervise very young children when they want to pet the cat.
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