If Chester’s respiratory rate is over 100 breaths per minute you should visit your Veterinarian immediate for an examination since this is well over physiological range; infections, anaemia, allergies, congenital anomalies, foreign objects, fluid, parasites among other causes may be the underlying cause. I cannot give you any at home advice in a case this severe except to visit a Veterinarian for a thorough examination. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

Okay so we’ve had our cat since being a kitten and she’s always been very scatty as we think she was abused, due to getting her and her having marks on her neck, but her breathing has always been rapid. (80 resps per minute) but in herself, she’s like any normal cat. She’s very friendly, not in any form of pain, is this something that needs to be addressed?


About a month ago my 8 month old cat started panting after playing. I have also noticed for some time that her breathing is quite rapid even when sleeping. I called the vet and he suggested I take her for a check up. Everything seemed fine when the vet visited her but to be sure he told me to take her for a chest x-ray and blood test. I got the results yesterday and still no cause has been found to explain her breathing. All the tests were normal. The vet says he cannot rule out a heart problem and he suggests taking her to a cardiologist for a heart ultrasound. Apart from the panting (which is not every time she exercises but just occasionally) and rapid breathing (which I see every day) she seems a very health and active cat. I am not sure how concerned I should be about this. Perhaps it is just due to the heat. But I would not want to overlook a more serious underlying cause. I would not want to put her through any more distress by taking her a long way to a cardiologist. I would be grateful for any advice.
Care.com does not employ, recommend or endorse any care provider or care seeker nor is it responsible for the conduct of any care provider or care seeker. Care.com provides information and tools to help care seekers and care providers connect and make informed decisions. However, each individual is solely responsible for selecting an appropriate care provider or care seeker for themselves or their families and for complying with all applicable laws in connection with any employment relationship they establish. Care.com does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment or engage in any conduct that requires a professional license.

It is possible that Milu is breathing rapidly due to pain, falling from that height may have left Milu with some permanent injury which occasionally causes some pain; however without examining him I cannot say with any certainty. You should continue to monitor him and look out for any other symptoms, but any head trauma may present with issue later on in life. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
As with all non-domestic hybrid source breeds, some Chausies may inherit intestinal tracts similar to that of the non-domestic ancestors. The intestinal tract may be a little shorter than that of the traditional domestic cat. A shorter intestinal tract is thought to be less capable of processing ingredients derived from plants. That would include any kind of cereal, as well as vegetables, herbs, and spices. Those ingredients may serve as triggers for chronic intestinal inflammation and eventually lead to chronic inflammatory bowel disease that is perpetuated by multiple allergies to proteins in commercial cat food.[9] Regardless of the cause, Chausies do seem somewhat prone to developing food allergies. To prevent this, breeders advise Chausie owners to feed only very high quality commercial cat foods, containing as little of plant-derived ingredients as possible or advise feeding homemade raw or cooked meat diets with appropriate supplementation. If homemade diets are fed, it should be with the guidance of someone experienced in preparing them, because meat by itself does not contain all the nutrients that Chausies require.

This breed does not like change, preferring for things to be uniform and predictable. It can be thrown off when dinnertime is altered, and is nit-picky about hygiene. It will not even enter its litter box if it is dirty. In the early years, this breed developed a reputation at shows for being difficult to work with because of traits like these. The Russian Blue was gentle and happy at home, but at shows it was visibly discontent and temperamental. Popularity declined and fewer Russian Blues were being shown until breeders focused on improving the attitudes of the breed through selective breeding and behavior management (e.g., soft music, recording of show noises, crystals, herbal remedies). This commitment to the breed paid off, and today the Russian Blue is a happy participant at cat shows.
Hello there! My girlfriend and I have an exclusively outdoor cat who has recently shown some worrisome behavior. Typically, Simba is very independent. Only allows some human interaction when we feed him, and even then it's more like we have to sneak a pet here and there. About three days ago I came home and noticed his breathing was fairly rapid. I thought maybe he just came to our porch after some activity, so I mentioned it to my girlfriend in passing. Yesterday she called me at work worried. Simba was letting her pet him and even came into our garage (which is basically set up like a living room. There's a heater, ac unit, tv, carpets, etc.) It's very home-y. Anyway, he's been in the garage the past two nights since its been in the thirties at night time. He lays very still, breathes very rapid and heavy. I can hear, what I think is congestion as he breathes. He hasn't eaten or drank much. The only thing I have gotten to eat are a few cat treats. I read online we could give him a small dosage of benedryl. But I don't want to give him anything that would essentially hurt him. He also has random asthma like episodes. Wheezing and coughing with his mouth closed. He meows when we talk to him, or look at him. Part of me feels like he's asking for help! Unsure if whatever he has is life threatening or just a little kitty cold.
There are many causes for a cat to have heavy breathing and without examining Jagger and auscultating his chest etc… I cannot say if there is a cause for concern or not; however heavy breathing may be caused by stress, pain, infections, obstructions, heart conditions among other causes. You should keep an eye on Jagger and visit your Veterinarian if you have any concerns or symptoms get worse. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
Hello so my cat is around 8 years old and is a outdoor cat. He came in today and is very low energy sitting in the middle of my room on the floor which is very unusual for him. He is breathing very rapidly, and aggressively. He sometimes makes a little noise out of his mouth. So I don’t know if this is something small and I shouldn’t worry, but this is my first day of seeing this symptoms so if it continues then I’ll go see a vet.
The reserved nature of the Foreign Blue means that strangers will have to acquaint themselves first before the cat can play with them. Guests will be more than likely regarded coolly and at a safe distance, with the cat not presenting himself until after a while. You may see these cats up high and perched on their safe spot, casually watching as the scene unfolds before deciding to jump in.
Grooming the Archangel Blue is easier as compared to other short-haired varieties. The dense, silky coat won’t shed as much and owners can enjoy the plush feel of the Foreign Blue. This breed is generally easy to maintain in terms of grooming and health. You will need to prepare several essentials, such as a cat-safe toothpaste, a toothbrush and other creature comforts. These items are available to purchase online or at the local pet store. For brushing the coat, you’ll need a medium toothed comb to keep the coat luxurious and smooth.
Points or Pointed Markings: "Points," or darker shades of the body color, generally include the ears, muzzle, tail, and feet of the cat. The original pointed cat was the Siamese, and many years later, the Himalayan was developed by crossing Siamese with Persian cats. Many other breeds of pointed cats are now accepted by cat registries, including Ragdoll, Ragamuffin, Birman, Exotic, Balinese, and Javanese. Breed registries disallow pointed patterns in most other breeds. Many mixed breed cats display these distinctive points, which may be found in various colors.
Interaction between your pet and children should always be supervised to prevent rough treatment or a crying child, but all in all the Foreign Blue makes for an excellent house cat. This breed tends to choose one family member and make it his or her life’s mission to follow that person around and give constant attention to. But this doesn’t mean that they won’t show affection to other household members, particularly to those who need it. These loving cats are known to calm crying babies by clowning around and even patting your face when you feel down.
If you maintain a good hygiene routine, your Russian blue will require minimal grooming and healthcare. There are several necessary items for keeping a cat comfortable after adoption, such as investing in a toothbrush and cat-safe toothpaste (you can find these items for purchase at your local pet store or online) to keep her teeth clean and white, and a medium-toothed comb to keep her double coat smooth and luxurious. One important piece of Russian blue cat breed information is that these kitties love mealtime, so make sure that she doesn't overeat. She probably asks for food multiple times a day, but remain firm and stick to regularly scheduled feedings, using measured amounts of cat food, and avoid too many cat treats.
Thank you for your email. Unfortunately, without examining Bella, I'm not sure if she is having a problem or not. If her behavior seems off, and her breathing is more rapid, it is worth paying attention to, and if you can get her in to see your veteirnarian before the storm hits tomorrow it would probably be a good idea, to make sure she is okay. I hope that all goes well for her!
I had to take my cat to the vet about a month ago, as she was coughing. The vet had said she was healthy, but he thought the coughing was due to a hair ball. We put her on a medication, but unfortunately the medication has not been working. I'm starting to notice that my cat is having a decreased appetite, and she's not as crazy, happy as normal. I'm concerned that this could be that she's allergic to something, or something is going on with the weather? I'm taking her to the vet on Saturday morning to get a better examination, but I wanted to see if you had any other suggestions, or if you could prepare me. Thank you!
My 2 year old female (not spayed) cat has had strange breathing since she was a kitten (a few month old) it started when I went on holiday and left her at home with my partner. When she’s active or sleeping her breathing is normal but it’s when she’s just resting and especially purring her breathing is quite fast and he stomach is visablly moving quickly. She is healthy and has never had any accidents or anything traumatic. She drinks well, goes to the toilet fine, she’s a fussy eater but does eat (so not really worrying) she’s very active, love she climbing and playing and running around. Her breathing is just really unusual when she’s resting. It’s like her whole body is moving with her breaths. In my opinion it’s like her little lungs are having to work hard to get the oxygen in however she doesn’t show any signs or symptoms of being unwell.
If Penny’s resting respiratory rate is above 40 breaths per minute, you should visit your Veterinarian for an examination; even if her bloodwork was good six weeks ago, something may have changed in that time. Without examining her and listing to her breathing and heart, I cannot start to narrow in on a specific cause; however the groaning is also concerning. Your Veterinarian will check her over and will treat is required. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

One of the Blue Russian's vulnerabilities is its tendency to be startled easily. They also have a natural proclivity to shyness and nervousness around strangers and in strange environments. If it is true that this breed was once the target of fur hunters (as some say), this would easily account for their caution and quick footedness. They would have had to move fast at the slightest sound to quite literally preserve their own skins.
There are a few possible causes of rapid breathing or increased respiration rate in cats which may be due to allergies, infection, foreign objects, sign of pain, other pulmonary problems among other issues. It is important that any serious causes or ruled out or treated, it would be best to have your Veterinarian give Darcy a check up to be on the safe side on your next visit as 80 breaths per minute is around double the physiological range. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM www.vet.cornell.edu/fhc/Health_Information/dyspnea.cfm
There are currently over 70 breeds of cats recognized by one cat registry or another. The IPCBA (International Progressive Cat Breeders Alliance) recognizes 73 feline breeds, while the more conservative CFA (Cat Fanciers' Association) gives the nod to only 41. Developing and registering a new breed of cats is a long, involved progress, and not every attempt is successful. For example, the CFA steadfastly refused to admit cats bred from "wild stock," such as the Bengal or the Savannah, although these breeds are both accepted by TICA and IPCBA.
This is about my cat named eren. He was fine when he was a kitten other than being feral and not used to people. But about two months ago, he started doing this thing where he is breathing fine and all one minute and the next it sounds like his breath is coming out in quick bursts almost like coughing. And it always goes for about 8 or so bursts of breath. Is this something I should take him to the vet about

The cat staged its first public appearance in 1871, when a Russian Blue was displayed at the Crystal Palace in London, under the name Archangel Cat. In those days, the Russian Blue looked quite different than what we are familiar with today. They were short-haired, solid blue cats with thick, dense, glossy coats. And though they were allowed to compete in the same class as other shorthaired blues, the Russian Blue frequently lost to the British Blue breed, a cat that had caught the fancy of the people.
Class clown — there’s always one! Purina notes that these confident and friendly creatures stand out because of their clowning around. These short-tailed cats, who were bred in the U.S. starting in the 1960s, according to TICA, make a great family pet since they’re sociable with humans of all ages and even other friends of the four-legged variety. They’re all about fun — but aren’t in need of your undivided attention — and don’t tend to attach themselves to one person.  
Example a amazing Maine Coon can cost $1,200 (Parents HCM tested, fixed, shots, everything!) compared to a sickly Maine Coon (Parents not tested, no shots, not fixed and not pretty) post on a classified site that is $500. Some people blame the kitten mills, but the person to blame is some one funding those places. You can do the research, you can pick some one upholding proper ethics.
I'm afraid that I can't offer much more assistance for Bella than what you have already done, without being able to see or examine her. If she has not had a trans-tracheal wash, that may be one test that can help determine the type of cells that are present in her lungs, and if the x-rays have not been evaluated by a specialist, that is another possibility, as your veterinarian should be able to send those x-rays to be evaluated further.

The heavy breathing is likely due to the pain which Blaze is experiencing, without examining him I cannot give you any specific indication of what has occurred but would recommend that you visit your Veterinarian for an examination to determine whether it is due to a traumatic injury from playing or from another cause. Visit your Veterinarian before they close for the weekend. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
The Russian Blue is robust, marked by strong sinews, a velvety fur and fine outlines. This breed is closely related to 3 other cat breeds, namely the British Blue (or the British Shorthair), the French Chartreux and Thailand Korat because they share the same hue and have short hair, but the similarity ends there. Each of the aforementioned blue breeds have their own fun personality and coat characteristics.
The AZA (American Zoological Association) zoos got together and took captive bred ocelots and released them in TX. The problem was that none of the cats in zoos had come from TX originally because the ocelots in TX had been extinct for a long time. Instead, they had all come from cats who were taken from the wilds of Central America long ago. In Central America ocelots eat snakes because most of them are non venomous. When the zoo bred ocelots were turned loose in TX they reverted to their ancient instincts in search of food and sought out snakes, but the TX snakes were mostly rattlesnakes and the ocelot program died out in a matter of weeks.

Without examining Potchi, I cannot cannot confirm whether or not she has a fever; rapid breathing and shivering may be due to a variety of different conditions including infections, trauma, pain among others. You should keep an eye on her, but due to her young age I would recommend visiting your Veterinarian for an examination to be on the safe side. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
Some cats may breathe faster than others due to temperature, weight, allergies, pain among other factors; without examining Chip and doing x-rays etc… we cannot rule everything out. If you still have concerns, speak with your Veterinarian about having an x-ray done for peace of mind but if your Veterinarian has auscultated the chest and there are no concerning sounds you should just keep a close eye. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
The slight upturn to the corners of the mouth make Russian Blues appear to be forever smiling. Members of this breed are generally polite, quiet, and well-behaved, for cats. It’s quite easy to teach them to stay off counters and out of off-limit areas; usually a simple “No” will do. However, Russian Blues seem to think politeness should go both ways and take offense at being made to look silly. A dignified cat, Russian Blues can be trusted to know when you’re making fun of them—and they won’t soon forget this breach in manners, either.

My 13 months old cat is breathing heavily and panting like a dog after only a minute or two of playing and jumping.. is it normal? I’m worried😟he is also no longer eating well for the last 2 months. He seemed to have lost his appetite. He will only eat if I add some treats in his foods but still will only eat a little bit. My cat never drink water since he came to us last year in August he will only drink milk, but now he rarely drink his milk.. I’m afraid he will be dehydrated so I gave him milk using the syringe.. his diet is wet food and he does eat a little of dry food only at night when he is hungry as I always leave dry foods for him to nibble at night.. is my cat sick?


He is not lethargic and doesn't have laboured breathing and doesn't pant when he does. He breathes well through his nose. When he washes himself, it's the normal kind. There are no abnormal bites or scratches when he does. My calculated guess is that it's normal for a kitten his age to be as active as he is? He gets the proper nutrition and he does drink kitten milk. Could that be a factor? I keep my eye on his breathing state when he sleeps on me.
When the Russian Blue cat sees his favorite family member, though, it’s a whole different matter. This cat will follow the individual around the whole house and can sometimes hitch a ride on that person’s shoulder. The Foreign Blue greets the owner at the door and is sensitive to your mood, i.e., with playtime or just by settling down next to you. Owners rarely hear the cat’s voice unless it’s mealtime. Some of the things an Archangel Blue appreciates are a hearty game of fetch, a window with a great outdoor view and pats on the head.
According to a report in a 1978 edition of the British tabloid paper “Sun”, a “pantig” (panther-tiger hybrid) was born at Southam Zoo, a private zoo located on Warwickshire farm (Southam is between Royal Leamington Spa and Daventry). The purported pantig was the result of a mating between a male black leopard and a tigress and was fostered by a Dachshund. The cub’s background colour was the typical yellow-brown shade of normal leopards. Unlike earlier attempts at captive-breeding leopard-tiger hybrids, this purported hybrid evidently survived into adulthood. Eventually, the Southam Zoo pantig was sold to an American zoo. Although this account is currently not scientifically authenticated, it indicates that the leopard’s recessive melanism gene is also recessive to the tiger’s normal tawny color.
Causes for an increase in respiratory rate may include pain, infections, heart disease, respiratory tract obstruction, increased temperature among others; a cat’s resting respiratory rate shouldn’t be higher than around 40 breaths per minute, if it is higher than this then I would advise you visit your Veterinarian for an examination to determine the underlying cause. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
This breathing may be normal for Gracie, or may be a sign of distress and not being able to get oxygen the way that she needs to. Since I cannot assess her or her respiratory system, it would be best to have her examined by a veterinarian. They'll be able to look at her, listen to her heart and lungs, and assess her general health to see if she is having any breathing issues that need attention.
Russian Blues have a tolerant nature toward children who treat them kindly and respectfully. They will even put up with the clumsy pats given by toddlers, as if they recognize that no harm is meant, and if necessary they will walk away or climb out of reach to escape being bonked on the head. That said, the patient and gentle Russian Blue should always be protected from rough treatment, so always supervise very young children when they want to pet the cat.
×