Without examining Luna it is difficult to weigh in on her conditions, the rapid breathing is concerning and is possibly due to anaemia if her gums are pale; blood counts would be a logical test to run if the gums are pale so that we would know if there really is a decrease in red blood cells as well as whether or not there is an increase in white blood cells or other tell tale signs. I understand that you’ve spent a lot already, but without examining Luna I cannot say for certain what the cause is, I would recommend visiting another clinic or a charity clinic for a better look at Luna’s symptoms. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
Regarding the Savannah and those wishing to add one as a member of their family… Do your research! Because of the lineage of the Savannah, and the fact that they are not far removed from their wild side, there are laws of the location where you live to look into. Some places are requiring licenses to own these hybrids, others don’t allow them at all, while still others are legal to own an animal that is farther removers, for example an F1 or F2 is illegal but anything past an F3 is okay.
A normal healthy cat will take 20-30 regular breaths per minute. The air travels into your cat’s lungs and is used to oxygenate the blood, which is then circulated throughout your cat’s vital organs. When a cat is suffering from rapid breathing, this breath rate increases and often becomes irregular, or shallow. This can often be an indication that your cat is not able to bring enough oxygen into the lungs to supply their body’s need. Rapid breathing is a symptom that can be caused by a number of illnesses or injuries. Since regular breathing is vital, if your cat is suffering from rapid breathing (also known as tachypnea) it is a serious and life threatening condition and you should seek immediate veterinary care.
My female cat, Bella, is almost 18 years old. In the past she has been diagnosed with feline leukemia, but does not show any signs of illness from that, vet said it was dormant and she no doubt has had it since birth. She is strictly an indoor cat. In the last 18 months, she has lost about 3 pounds. Up until a few weeks ago, she was eating and drinking as normal.
Congestive heart failure is a life-threatening disorder which occurs when the heart doesn’t pump blood as efficiently as it should which causes fluid to back up in the lungs and abdomen, while other organs don’t receive enough blood to function properly. It can be caused by heart diseases such as cardiomyopathy, heartworm, myocarditis, endocarditis, congenital disorders, high blood pressure, tumours, hyperthyroidism and acromegaly.
Although an immediate improvement in the bloodline was made when Russian Blues were imported from Britain, it would take years to establish the exact type that would personify the Russian Blue. Breeders were breeding traits into their lines based on their own preferences, so that their Blues would be splendid in one area, but never overall. The breed was too varied, with some exhibiting pale, exquisitely plush coats, and others showing elegant bodies, beautifully shaped heads, and striking green eyes.
Queening is a painful process just like childbirth is for humans and some heavy breathing or panting may occur afterwards for a few days due to discomfort. But if you feel that she is straining or in distress you should visit your Veterinarian to check her over to ensure that there isn’t a retained kitten or another issue leading to these symptoms. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
While oxygen is being transferred to the red blood cells, carbon dioxide is transferred from the red blood cells into the lungs. It is then carried out through the nose through a process referred to as expiration. This cyclic motion of breathing is controlled by the respiratory center in the brain and nerves in the chest. Diseases that affect the respiratory system, or the respiratory center in the brain, can bring about breathing difficulties. Troubled or labored breathing is medically referred to as dyspnea, and excessively rapid breathing is medically referred to as tachypnea (also, polypnea).
Allergy medicine wouldn’t help here, it may be a case that the beef tendon is causing pain or an obstruction for Kingston which may explain his posture of sitting and his increased respiratory rate. I would keep an eye on him, but if there is no improvement within a few hours I would recommend taking him into your Veterinarian for an examination; I wouldn’t induce vomiting since if there is an obstruction this may cause more pain and distress for him. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
Savannah cats are created by crossing a house cat with an African Serval. The original hybrid is called an F1 and is considered too "wild" to be a house cat. When you breed an F1 Savannah with another Savannah or another cat breed, the resulting kittens are called F2. Breeding F2 females produces a generation called F3, which still has a considerable amount of Serval genes, but three generations of domesticity. F1 females are retained as breeding stock, although the male hybrids are often infertile. Sometimes F2 or F1 Savannahs are bred with Servals to create Savannahs with a higher number of Serval genes. Or they may be bred with Savannah males of even later generations (F5 or F6). Male Savannahs are usually sterile in the first few generations.

They appeared under the name Archangel cat and competed against other shorthair cats. Though they are a shorthaired cat breed, it is not believed that they are related in any way to other shorthaired solid blue breeds (Korat, Chartreux, and British Blue) as their coats are very different. In 1912, the GCCF (Governing Council of Cat Fancy) recognized the breed as a breed of its own and gave it its own class called Foreign Blue. The breed grew in popularity but World War II almost completely wiped out the breed. After the war, breeders set forth to revive the breed and began to outcross with other breeds. Russian Blues were mated with British Blues and blue point Siamese.


This is a well-behaved cat that is easy to train. Or, rather, it easily trains its people. It enjoys a good game of fetch and will keep the game going longer than you may have time for, and you will make time because the Russian Blue is known for actually appearing hurt when it has been ignored. Elegant, and reserved, this cat is also very playful, and loves to chase after toys or sunbeams.
If the resting respiratory rate is above 40 breaths per minute, you should ideally visit a Veterinarian for an examination as it can be difficult to narrow in on a specific cause; there are a few possible causes for this rapid breathing including infections, laryngeal disorders, pain among other causes. You should visit a Veterinarian as soon as possible for an examination to narrow in on a cause. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
Unlike horses, the breeding pair does not need to be kept away from other big cats, but they do need to be kept close in order to breed, therefore it is recommended to place them in a fenced area. Winged big cats, ghosts and hybrids are sterile and thus cannot breed. White lions and lionesses and white tigers cannot breed with other big cat species.

There are many different causes for rapid breathing in cats which may include pain, respiratory infection, heart failure among other causes. Without an examination and thorough auscultation of the chest, I cannot say what the cause is or the best course of treatment; anytime resting respiratory rate is over 40 breaths per minute, you should visit your Veterinarian as soon as possible. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
Big cats are very aggressive, and will sprint and chase down their prey, this can range from mobs as small as ants, to as large asdeer. This also includes the player. If a big cat is attacked by another mob, it will fight back. Like bears, big cats will attack other mobs when hungry. Once a big cat has made a kill, it will be satisfied and will not be aggressive until it is hungry again. Tamed big cats won't attack each other or other mobs, unless another mob attacks it first.
Russian Blues are known to be quiet, gentle, genteel cats, and are usually reserved or absent when strangers come to call. When they’re with their own beloved and trusted humans, however, they are playful and affectionate. Russian Blues are active but not overly so. They like nothing better than to spend time pouncing on a favorite toy or chasing sunbeams. They willingly entertain themselves, but prefer games in which their preferred people take an active role. When you’re home, they follow you around, unobtrusive but ever-present companions.
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Sadly Arwen got worse throughout the night. She started to seizure and her breathing got worse. Then she started to not be able to move or blink her right eye and her wyes completely dilated until you could no longer see the pretty green. Finally she started to get severe swelling under her tongue and had even a harder time breathing. I took her to a vet asap but it was too late and she had to be euthanized. My vet thinks she had a massive stroke and even if we could of gotten her there sooner the outcome would of been the same. I've never heard of a cat so young getting a stroke like that, is it that unusual and what could of caused that? She was abused in her previous home and I think that factored into her very nervous disposition, she was very sweet and loving but was scared of just about everything. I guess I'm just trying to find a reason why and how but I'm also still just so upset too.
My cat has always been healthy for 18 years human age until just last week of April my daughter told me that she is blind banging walls, and when I look closely her breathing was soooo rapid and that’s why I took her to the vet the following day (Thursday) and the vet took an x-ray found out that Shellas lungs was covered with fluids, he did not take a blood test that day coz of her conditions, he gave me pills but so far shellas conditions is not getting any better... what should I do????
World War II nearly put an end to the breed. Very few cats survived the years of privation, and British and Scandinavian breeders turned to other breeds, primarily the Siamese and the British Blue, to help revive their bloodlines. Because of the Siamese influence, the cats developed a more extreme look, and the texture of their coat changed. It took years to bring the breed back to its original appearance. That was achieved by combining British bloodlines, which emphasized plush, silvery coats, and Scandinavian bloodlines, which were known for producing cats with bright breen eyes and flat profiles. The result was the Russian Blue of moderate type seen today.
While asthma would be helped by albuterol if this were related to heart disease then albuterol can be contraindicated, as it may raise an already fast heart rate making her heart function even more inefficient. I understand that you were trying to do anything to help but I don't recommend starting therapy without a better idea of what her primary problem is.
The respiratory system has many parts, including the nose, throat (pharynx and larynx), windpipe, and lungs. Air comes in through the nose and is then carried down into the lungs, through a process referred to as inspiration. In the lungs, the oxygen is transferred to the red blood cells. The red blood cells then carry the oxygen to other organs in the body. This is all part of the physical process of a healthy body.

I was under the impression that a Bobcat (meaning the wild kind) would be thinking dinner if he ran across a domestic cat. Bobcats are also so much bigger than a normal housecat. I can't imagine them breeding. Do they really breed in the "wild?" I got to see a bobcat closeup at a cat rescue (the owner used to do wildlife rescue and this guy couldn't go back to the wild) and I just can't imagine him wanting to breed with a domestic cat, as opposed to eating it.
Russian Blues like their daily routine to be just so, and dislike household changes more than the average cat— and the average cat dislikes household changes a lot. They particularly dislike changes to their dinner schedule, and will make you aware of their displeasure. They are also fastidious about their litter boxes and will complain or may even go elsewhere if they’re not spic and span.

There are many different causes for an increase in respiration rate which may include pain, respiratory tract infection, parasites, tumours, anaemia, heart disease, pulmonary edema, poisoning, allergies among other causes; without examining Petey and diving into the case I cannot think of a specific cause. If the faeces are greasy I would look at changing the food to another brand and stick with a kibble over a wet food and look for any improvement. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM


The Russian Blue is robust, marked by strong sinews, a velvety fur and fine outlines. This breed is closely related to 3 other cat breeds, namely the British Blue (or the British Shorthair), the French Chartreux and Thailand Korat because they share the same hue and have short hair, but the similarity ends there. Each of the aforementioned blue breeds have their own fun personality and coat characteristics.
Sounds like extra fluid. My feline leukemia positive cat was belly breathing about 50 times a minute. I rushed him to the vet who said he had a hemo thorax and removed 200ml frothy blood. He had a tumor that was leaking and compressing lungs. He layed stretched out or up on his elbows. If your cat is belly breathing and breathing upwards of >30 minute-run to the vet! Sadly I put my baby to sleep that day. I had another cat with CHF (congestive heart failure) was treatable with meds. SHe lived a year.
Cats can also develop fluid build up in the chest that is localized outside the lungs. This happens in an area named the pleural space. When fluid accumulates in the pleural space, the lungs cannot inflate as much as they should. Your cat will develop shortness of breath and labored breathing as more fluid fills this space. According to VCA Animal Hospitals, some causes of pleural effusion include:
My cat (8-9 months) just got spayed 2 days ago. I have another cat so to be sure the wound was safe we got her a vest instead of a cone. she came home that afternoon and she was very quiet and would not walk around, we thought it was normal due to the vest and anesthesia. yesterday we noticed she isn't eating, drinking or going to the litterbox on her own. she only wants to lay down and sleep. If we bring her to the water, food, and litter box she'll do her things and just lay down again. we kept thinking she was just tired or did not like to walk with the vest so we went to sleep this morning o notice she is not in her bed but inside the transporter box, and breathing quite fast. My boyfriend took her to the vet, to do an X-ray and they said she had some pulmonary infection but they can't do the necessary tests to pinpoint exactly what is the issue because it requires anesthesia and she just had one a few days ago. they gave her some medicine bt it did not work and they are moving her to the vet hospital so she can have someone with her during the night. should I be worried, will she be ok?
Four of the five species of the big cats (the Panthera genus – lion, tiger, leopard, jaguar and snow leopard), the exception being the snow leopard can hybridize with each other to produce numerous hybrids. In fact, breeding of two different pantheras to produce hybrid big cats has been banned in many zoos and animal sanctuaries due to no conservation value of the hybrid, and the risk it poses on the mother that gives birth to it.
If your cat is having difficulty breathing, this can be a life threatening emergency. It is important to have your cat seen by a veterinarian as soon as possible. You will need to give a thorough history of your cat's health, onset of symptoms, and possible incidents that might have preceded this condition. During the examination, the veterinarian will carefully observe how your cat breathes, and will listen to its chest for evidence of a heart murmur or fluid in the lungs. Your cat's gum color will be carefully evaluated as well, since the color of the gums can indicate whether oxygen is being delivered to the organs (hypoxemia) effectively, or if it there is a low red blood cell count (anemia). Your veterinarian may try to get your cat to cough by pressing on its windpipe. If your cat is having extreme difficulty breathing, the veterinarian will give your cat oxygen to help it breathe before doing any more tests.

If your cat does appear to have a heart problem, your veterinarian may also order an ECG (electrocardiogram) to measure the rhythm and electrical activity of the heart, both of which determine the heart's ability to operate normally. If your cat's problem is in its nose or airways, a small camera called an endoscope may be used to get a closer look at these areas. These procedures are known as rhinoscopy and bronchoscopy, respectively. While your veterinarian is examining your cat with the endoscope, samples of fluid and cells may be taken for biopsic analysis.
In 1900, Carl Hagenbeck crossed a female leopard with a Bengal tiger. The stillborn offspring had a mixture of spots, rosettes and stripes. Henry Scherren wrote, “A male tiger from Penang served two female Indian leopards, and twice with success. Details are not given and the story concludes somewhat lamely. ‘The leopardess dropped her cubs prematurely, the embryos were in the first stage of development and were scarcely as big as young mice.’ Of the second leopardess there is no mention.”
I cannot think of a connection between the running after another cat and the symptoms that she is presenting with except possibly hypoglycemia (normally causes an increase in appetite) due to the blood glucose level being too low. I would suggest to rub a little corn syrup or honey on the gums to see if there is any improvement in Cupcake’s symptoms; ensure you keep Cupcake hydrated and visit your Veterinarian on Monday morning, if the symptoms increase in severity visit an Emergency Veterinarian. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
I took my senior cat Butters to the vets just a few weeks ago and the vet did just a physical exam. Said he was very healthy for a senior and looked great. Just two weeks before the appointment I had noticed he put on weight out of no where.. so since the visit I have noticed that he’s breathing very heavily and quickly and it shows in his abdominal. No panting though. I also noticed that he is purring more than usual. He was always did purr as he’s a loving and content boy, but I’ve noticed it even when I am not giving him affection and he is sitting next to me. Should I be worried at all?

Hello, so after I had a party at my house a few days ago, my cat has been very weak, sleeping all the time, won't eat or drink as much as he used to, and breathing rapidly. I tried bringing him to a vet a couple of days ago and they said it was only stress due to the loud music and crowds from the party, and they told me to give him liquid food along with vitamins every hour for a few days. I've done that for a couple of days but it seems like my cat's breathing actually had gotten more shallow and heavy. I'm afraid that the vet misdiagnosed my cat (I don't trust the credibility of that vet, since they're not the one I'm used to go to), do you think there's anything more than just stress? Also if it helps, he's just gotten his first vaccination around last week. Thank you


Russian Blues have a tolerant nature toward children who treat them kindly and respectfully. They will even put up with the clumsy pats given by toddlers, as if they recognize that no harm is meant, and if necessary they will walk away or climb out of reach to escape being bonked on the head. That said, the patient and gentle Russian Blue should always be protected from rough treatment, so always supervise very young children when they want to pet the cat.
My 7month old cat is brething so fast.. early today, we had a family/relative get together in our house. The children are playing with kokwa, kokwa is afraid and keeps on running away from the children, he hides so no one can caught him. Tonight, i notice his rapid open mouth breathing.. how's my cat? This is so unusual. Can you help me find what is happening to Kokwa?

The Russian Blue stands out for his coat color. To the uninformed, he might look gray, but in cat show terms he is an even, bright blue with silver-tipped hairs that make him seem to glisten. Some Russian Blue kittens are born with “ghost stripes,” a reminder of the tabby gene that all cats carry, even if it isn’t expressed in their coat, but these generally fade, leaving the cat with the solid blue coat of maturity.
There are various different causes for rapid breathing and rapid heart rate which may be caused by stress, poisoning, infections, anaemia, heart disease among many other conditions; if there are behavioural changes like hiding there may be fear or another similar component. Without examining Wagamama I cannot say whether or not there is a cause for concern or not, but you should have your Veterinarian check her over to be on the safe side. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

Getting a Russian Blue cat is no light matter if you’re serious about having one in the house. The best breeders are the ones that are the most established in their region; they won’t easily give you a Foreign Blue until they know that you’re a good candidate for it. For starters, it will be best to meet the kitten’s mom and dad and check for pedigree and overall health and well-being. Allow the breeder to ask you several questions to make sure you and the cat breed will be compatible living together.
Hypoglycemia is a life-threatening condition in which the blood sugar levels drop dangerously low. The pancreatic beta cells produce the hormone insulin which helps to move glucose from food into the cells (for energy).  It is not a disease in itself, but it is a symptom of an underlying disorder. Causes include excessive insulin administration in the diabetic cat, decreased glucose production (missed meal, vomiting, certain medications, glycogen storage disease), and excessive glucose consumption due to sepsis (bacterial infection of the blood).
The Russian Blue is robust, marked by strong sinews, a velvety fur and fine outlines. This breed is closely related to 3 other cat breeds, namely the British Blue (or the British Shorthair), the French Chartreux and Thailand Korat because they share the same hue and have short hair, but the similarity ends there. Each of the aforementioned blue breeds have their own fun personality and coat characteristics.
Unlike horses, the breeding pair does not need to be kept away from other big cats, but they do need to be kept close in order to breed, therefore it is recommended to place them in a fenced area. Winged big cats, ghosts and hybrids are sterile and thus cannot breed. White lions and lionesses and white tigers cannot breed with other big cat species.

There are many causes for a cat to have heavy breathing and without examining Jagger and auscultating his chest etc… I cannot say if there is a cause for concern or not; however heavy breathing may be caused by stress, pain, infections, obstructions, heart conditions among other causes. You should keep an eye on Jagger and visit your Veterinarian if you have any concerns or symptoms get worse. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
My cat was run over nearly a month ago. She had her tail amputated. She then come home and developed a lump in her belly. She went back to the vets and had surgery the lump was removed and sent to the lab for testing. It come back with relation to trauma of the car accident. Then last Friday i took her cone off to eat her dinner i went upstairs to have a shower and left her unattended when i come down her cut and drain marks were bleeding. I took her back to the vets who cleaned her up and sent us home! Sunday i noticed she was very quiet and not herself. I took her to the vets last night and she was shaking and her breathing was up at 48 breathes per minute! the vet gave her a 2 week antibiotic injection and has sent us home! today Wednesday i measured her breathing again and it is still at 48 a minute. I have called the vet and said that if she is still the same tomorrow then bring her back. How long does it take for the antibiotic to start working and will this then slow her breathing down? Thank you in advance
My cat developed rapid labored respirations a week ago, the vet diagnosed lung cancer and he also had bladder infection. On xray he had consolidated whitish area with scattered crystal like areas. He was given antibiotics for infection and a steroid injection the vet said to temporary help with the breathing but he said my pet did not have long to live. He is breathing less labored and his rate fluctuates between 60-80/min. question is could this be something else instead of cancer-fungal, parasite? I do feed stray cats and even though he is mainly indoor cat I do take him out when I'm outside and he has gone under shrubs and maybe has sniffed something?
These cats have some serious staying power. Hailing from Siberia, this breed was first referenced all the way back in 1000 A.D., according to TICA. Powerful, intelligent and entertaining best describe the Siberian, which frequently takes problem-solving (like opening doors) into their own paws. Their semi-long coat is thick in the winter to withstand the elements and becomes shorter and lighter in the warmer months.

We have a 9 week old Bengal kitten that it was discovered yesterday at our vet appointment that he has a grade 4 cardiac murmur. He has been eating and moderately playing like normal. Tonight his breathing is pretty rapid - ranging from 60-80 bpm. He’s sleeping peacefully now. Anything I should do? I did call a cardiologist, but we can’t get an appointment until July and even if we could, we can’t afford the visit. Looking for help!

My 1-year old cat, Chip, seems to be in a relatively constant state of tachypnea. He’s had a history of rapid/intermittently shallow breathing since I adopted him at 3 months old. He otherwise acts normal, with no periods of lethargy/concerning weight fluctuation/appetite or thirst fluctuation/GI upset. His mucous membrane color is always good and pink, and his physical exams have always showed NSF, so no palpable thoracic masses or anything like that. Should I be concerned about an internal mass, heartworms, or anything like that? Thanks so much for your time.
Regardless, you should visit your Veterinarian or an Emergency Veterinarian to examine Gizmo since she should be eating and drinking normally after this routine surgery and the ‘seizure like’ activity is also concerning; the moderate increase in respiration may be due to discomfort from surgery or due to something more serious. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
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