A stray cat showed up at my house a couple days ago. She is very thin and I've started her on small throughout the day. She is eating, drinking, voiding, and stooling okay. Eyes, ears, and nose are all clear. The only major thing I've noticed is rapid breathing when purring or stress (loud noises make her skittish). I have pets of my own and really cannot afford a costly vet visit, and our local shelter and a rescue are overwhelmed with companion animals at this time. I've started her on antibiotics and am keeping her isolated from my own pets. My daughter has asthma and this looks very similar. Any advice? I've found out that her previous owner passed away and a neighbour tried to bring her to her house, the cat bolted and they couldn't find her, 3 weeks later she showed up at my place. She is a spayed 5 year old female who was up to date on shots.


About a month ago my 8 month old cat started panting after playing. I have also noticed for some time that her breathing is quite rapid even when sleeping. I called the vet and he suggested I take her for a check up. Everything seemed fine when the vet visited her but to be sure he told me to take her for a chest x-ray and blood test. I got the results yesterday and still no cause has been found to explain her breathing. All the tests were normal. The vet says he cannot rule out a heart problem and he suggests taking her to a cardiologist for a heart ultrasound. Apart from the panting (which is not every time she exercises but just occasionally) and rapid breathing (which I see every day) she seems a very health and active cat. I am not sure how concerned I should be about this. Perhaps it is just due to the heat. But I would not want to overlook a more serious underlying cause. I would not want to put her through any more distress by taking her a long way to a cardiologist. I would be grateful for any advice.
Class clown — there’s always one! Purina notes that these confident and friendly creatures stand out because of their clowning around. These short-tailed cats, who were bred in the U.S. starting in the 1960s, according to TICA, make a great family pet since they’re sociable with humans of all ages and even other friends of the four-legged variety. They’re all about fun — but aren’t in need of your undivided attention — and don’t tend to attach themselves to one person.  
During this same time, Scandinavian breeders crossed similar looking blue coated cats from Finland with Siamese cats. The cats had emerald green eyes. Russian Blues made their way to North America in the early 1900s but it took some time for breeding programs to begin in North America. The first Russian Blue was not registered with the CFA until 1949. In 1964, GC Maja Acre Igor II, a Russian Blue, won CFA Grand Champion. In 1965, British breeders began to express concern over the evolving appearance of the Russian Blue cat breed. Russian Blues were bred with the similar looking Scandinavian cats that had beautiful emerald eyes and the Russian Blue look and personality that was desired was finally achieved.
Without examining Luna it is difficult to weigh in on her conditions, the rapid breathing is concerning and is possibly due to anaemia if her gums are pale; blood counts would be a logical test to run if the gums are pale so that we would know if there really is a decrease in red blood cells as well as whether or not there is an increase in white blood cells or other tell tale signs. I understand that you’ve spent a lot already, but without examining Luna I cannot say for certain what the cause is, I would recommend visiting another clinic or a charity clinic for a better look at Luna’s symptoms. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

I have a 7 yr old Scottish Fold. I took her to the vet on Friday because I noticed her breathing rapidly. The vet said there were no signs of a respiratory infection (lungs sounded clear, eyes & ears appeared fine) but gave her a shot of antibiotics and some pain med. (in case she was panting due to being in pain)and sent us home. Its now 2 days later and shes still having a hard time breathing. Could she possibly jst have a stuffy nose from allergies and thats causing her to struggle. I mentioned it to the vet, but he said no because her nose doesnt have any discharge.
The slight upturn to the corners of the mouth make Russian Blues appear to be forever smiling. Members of this breed are generally polite, quiet, and well-behaved, for cats. It’s quite easy to teach them to stay off counters and out of off-limit areas; usually a simple “No” will do. However, Russian Blues seem to think politeness should go both ways and take offense at being made to look silly. A dignified cat, Russian Blues can be trusted to know when you’re making fun of them—and they won’t soon forget this breach in manners, either.
Though I here you. There are those who have a special relationship with exotic animals, and they don't breed. I have feral cats, I trap, neuter and release. It takes a lot of patience as well as knowledge to have and care for an exotic animal, but it can be done. This is my friend and Nicky https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=472498366114433&set=a.453487321348871.109921.453002251397378&type=1&relevant_count=1.
It’s a great thing you went to the vet immediately. And even better news if the doc said everything seemed normal! We are no veterinarians – Paul and I – so please take your vet’s advice first. I would just add that it’s a good sign there’s not really other symptoms to the fast breathing other than loss of appetite (which might come back, or might already have since this morning??) It could be a small respiratory infection or a general feeling of unwellness, but your cat is older so it’s a good thing you checked with a vet first. Now it’s roughly 7:30 pm for you, I’d say if your cat is not having any other physical signs of distress or panting, blue gums, or anything bizarre, it will be safe to wait until the morning to see if the breathing has calmed. But please go with your gut and your knowledge of your cat!! If your cat’s behavior is still abnormal and he is refusing food then give another shot at the vet’s office. Possible bloodwork could be done and tests to see if there’s heartworm or other diseases that could be a cause for the prolonged, rapid breathing.
If your cat is suffering from shock or pain as a result of trauma, if no broken bones are detected your vet will often take a conservative approach and allow your cat to be released to go home with a prescription for pain medication. You will need to provide a safe, warm and quiet place for your cat to heal and recover. Allergies will be treated with antihistamines and ongoing medication dosage in the case of seasonal or non acute reactions. 
While the Russian Blue loves your company, he is capable of entertaining himself during the day while you are at work. Unlike some active, intelligent breeds, he is not destructive but moves through the house with the lithe grace of a Russian ballerina. When you are at home, his subtle sense of humor and manual dexterity will never fail to entertain. Just make sure you laugh with him, not at him. He has a strong sense of self-worth and doesn’t like being made fun of.

My cat has began to be really affectionate. than started meow more and more often, noticed blood and i called vets, they said i can wait till next day for appointment as it doesn't seem to be serious. Right now she is started rapidly breathe and walks back and forth from my room to next room and getting comfy in the sheets. i know it could be signs of pregnancy, and her nipples are slightly swollen. but i only just noticed today and all been developing within the past 5 hours.
Chest x-rays and standard blood tests may be indicative of valley fever but the condition is only confirmed with a specific test for valley fever; all other indicators may say valley fever but we still need the test to confirm. However if Nunzi has any response to the antifungal treatment then it adds another tick in the box for valley fever. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM https://vfce.arizona.edu/valley-fever-dogs/diagnosis https://vfce.arizona.edu/valley-fever-dogs/treatment

The Chausie was developed from hybrids of the Jungle Cat (Felis chaus), the largest species of the genus Felis, found in Asia. They can grow up to three feet long and weigh 35 pounds, but are generally around 18 pounds. Like the hybrids that developed into the Savannah and Bengal breeds, the males of the first few generations are usually infertile, and the F4 and F5 are considered truly domestic and suitable for cat shows. TICA classifies the Chausie as a championship breed.

Stress may be a contributing factor for why Leo is breathing rapidly and sleeping, also a new environment may have other allergens or contaminants like cigarette smoke or different cleaning products which may cause some respiratory irritation. You should keep an eye on Leo for the meantime and if the problem continues you should visit your Veterinarian when you get back. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM


I took my senior cat Butters to the vets just a few weeks ago and the vet did just a physical exam. Said he was very healthy for a senior and looked great. Just two weeks before the appointment I had noticed he put on weight out of no where.. so since the visit I have noticed that he’s breathing very heavily and quickly and it shows in his abdominal. No panting though. I also noticed that he is purring more than usual. He was always did purr as he’s a loving and content boy, but I’ve noticed it even when I am not giving him affection and he is sitting next to me. Should I be worried at all?

You’ll be immediately drawn to the Russian Blue’s shining green eyes and the silver-like, smooth coat. While majority of the coat is colored bright blue, the foot may sometimes have a lavender base that darkens as it travels upwards to the guard hair tips, which is the cat’s protective topcoat. The ends of each strand of fur sparkles with silver, often resembling the tips of spears when the light catches it.
My wonderful kitty Dave is generally very healthy. He cuddles and plays all the time and is always by my side when I’m home. I’ve noticed this a few times but most recently a few days ago- he’ll be breathing very fast (60bpm) and shivering. He doesn’t try to hide and definitely wants to be held or cuddled but doesn’t want to move around. Last time it happened there was a bad thunderstorm and I wasn’t home for the worst part of it. Could he have just been scared? After a little while as the storm does down, he used his litter box and peed a lot, then pooped - also a lot. Buried it. Drank his water, ate some food and was back to purring and playing. I can’t remember if it had stormed the other times he’s acted like that with the rapid breathing and dilated glassy eyes, but i did notice that he’ll cuddle then use the box and feel better. He’s even cried before in his litter box, like it hurt to go poop. But I figured out that only happened when he ate fishy cat food so now he gets beef, chicken or turkey. 

Some cats become so congested that they are unable to breathe through their noses. When this happens, your cat may hold his mouth partway open to breathe. This is the only time that home care for heavy breathing in a cat is appropriate. You can use a cotton ball and warm water to clean any discharge off of your cat's nose. Place your cat in a humid environment such as a bathroom while running the hot water, or in front of a humidifier. If your cat is not eating, seems lethargic, or has excessive congestion, you will need to see a veterinarian for an accurate diagnosis and possible medication.
Hello there! My girlfriend and I have an exclusively outdoor cat who has recently shown some worrisome behavior. Typically, Simba is very independent. Only allows some human interaction when we feed him, and even then it's more like we have to sneak a pet here and there. About three days ago I came home and noticed his breathing was fairly rapid. I thought maybe he just came to our porch after some activity, so I mentioned it to my girlfriend in passing. Yesterday she called me at work worried. Simba was letting her pet him and even came into our garage (which is basically set up like a living room. There's a heater, ac unit, tv, carpets, etc.) It's very home-y. Anyway, he's been in the garage the past two nights since its been in the thirties at night time. He lays very still, breathes very rapid and heavy. I can hear, what I think is congestion as he breathes. He hasn't eaten or drank much. The only thing I have gotten to eat are a few cat treats. I read online we could give him a small dosage of benedryl. But I don't want to give him anything that would essentially hurt him. He also has random asthma like episodes. Wheezing and coughing with his mouth closed. He meows when we talk to him, or look at him. Part of me feels like he's asking for help! Unsure if whatever he has is life threatening or just a little kitty cold.
My cat is about 9 years old, and about two days ago his breathing started to become very rapid at about 60-80 breaths per minute. He is eating properly and acting normally and doesn't appear to be in pain. Is there any reason this could be as this hasn't happened to any of our previous cats. He is also very healthy and has only gone to the vets for mess once for a urine infection he always has the de wormer and the anti flea drops as well as his vaccines
Okay so we’ve had our cat since being a kitten and she’s always been very scatty as we think she was abused, due to getting her and her having marks on her neck, but her breathing has always been rapid. (80 resps per minute) but in herself, she’s like any normal cat. She’s very friendly, not in any form of pain, is this something that needs to be addressed?
Ligers enjoy swimming, which is a characteristic of tigers, and are very sociable like lions. Ligers (and tigons) exist only in captivity because the habitats of the parental species do not overlap in the wild. Historically, when the Asiatic Lion was prolific, the territories of lions and tigers did overlap and there are legends of ligers existing in the wild.
In 1871 a Russian Blue was shown at the first cat show at the Crystal Palace in London, under the name Archangel Cat. At this point, Russian Blues were shorthaired, solid blue felines with foreign body types. From photos and published sources of the time, the original coat was thick, dense, glossy, and colored a light silver-blue. Russian Blues competed in the same class with all other shorthaired blues, despite obvious differences in type. Since the round-headed, cobby British Blues were favored in the show halls, the slender Russian Blues rarely won.
Polydactyl cats, also called "polydacts" or "Hemingway cats" are sometimes confused as a "breed," however they fall under the domestic cat category. Truthfully, most registries do not accept polydact cats in their standards. Polydactyl means "many toes," and is considered a genetic defect. Ernest Hemingway had a number of polydactyl cats at his estate, and he allowed them to breed indiscriminately, so, many years after his death, the descendants of his original cats still live there. Polydacts may come in any variety of colors and color patterns.
An increased respiratory rate at rest over 40 breaths per minute is concerning, you should think about visiting your Veterinarian for an examination since this may be an indicator for pain, heart disease, infections among other conditions. Without examining Jupiter for any other symptoms I cannot narrow in on a specific cause. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
Lethargy and increased respiratory rate are not specific symptoms as they are shared with many conditions; however I’m concerned that they are a common sign that an animal is in pain, but without examining Marilyn I cannot say whether she is in pain or there is another cause for the symptoms. You should visit your Veterinarian for an examination to be on the safe side especially if this has been going on for a day or more. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
Four of the five species of the big cats (the Panthera genus – lion, tiger, leopard, jaguar and snow leopard), the exception being the snow leopard can hybridize with each other to produce numerous hybrids. In fact, breeding of two different pantheras to produce hybrid big cats has been banned in many zoos and animal sanctuaries due to no conservation value of the hybrid, and the risk it poses on the mother that gives birth to it.

Two days is still early days for treatment but you should start seeing some improvement in the next day or so, I would say to give it the weekend and if there is no improvement in Jinx’s condition you should return to your Veterinarian on Monday for another examination. Improvement in an animal's condition, especially with antibiotics, can be delayed in most cases so unless your Veterinarian said specifically ‘you’ll see improvement over the next 24 hours’ or something similar you should give it three or four days at least. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
If Penny’s resting respiratory rate is above 40 breaths per minute, you should visit your Veterinarian for an examination; even if her bloodwork was good six weeks ago, something may have changed in that time. Without examining her and listing to her breathing and heart, I cannot start to narrow in on a specific cause; however the groaning is also concerning. Your Veterinarian will check her over and will treat is required. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
Without examining Midnight it is difficult to give a diagnosis since lethargy and loss of appetite are vague symptoms common with many different conditions; infections, parasites (regardless of indoor or not), foreign objects, poisoning, spoiled food, injury (fell from somewhere) among many other causes may lead to these symptoms. You should ensure that Midnight is kept hydrated, but if there is no improvement you should visit your Veterinarian for an examination. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
Thank you for your question, and I am sorry about Billi. Unfortunately, without seeing the x-ray, knowing where or how large the tumor is, I can't comment on possible solutions. Lung masses are difficult to treat and tend not to respond well to therapy, but it really does depend on the type of mass, and he is quite young to have lung cancer. Sometimes we are able to to a tracheal wash to try and identify the type of cells, but I'm not sure if that is an option for Billi. Any possible treatments would be a good conversation with your veterinarian, who has seen Billi, and his x-rays, and knows more about his situation. I hope that he does well.
A normal cat should always breathe with small movements of its chest. If your cat's sides are moving a large amount, this can indicate labored breathing. Unlike dogs, cats should generally never pant. You can also try to watch for any increased abdominal movements with your pet's breathing. If you cat is breathing normally, you shouldn't see any excessive movement in the abdomen, or any hitch to the breathing.
If your cat is having difficulty breathing, this can be a life threatening emergency. It is important to have your cat seen by a veterinarian as soon as possible. You will need to give a thorough history of your cat's health, onset of symptoms, and possible incidents that might have preceded this condition. During the examination, the veterinarian will carefully observe how your cat breathes, and will listen to its chest for evidence of a heart murmur or fluid in the lungs. Your cat's gum color will be carefully evaluated as well, since the color of the gums can indicate whether oxygen is being delivered to the organs (hypoxemia) effectively, or if it there is a low red blood cell count (anemia). Your veterinarian may try to get your cat to cough by pressing on its windpipe. If your cat is having extreme difficulty breathing, the veterinarian will give your cat oxygen to help it breathe before doing any more tests.
Black ticked tabby Chausies have black ticking, black stripes on the inside of the upper legs and to a lesser extent on the outside, black rings on the tail, a black tail tip, and black tabby markings around the eyes. They are also known as brown ticked tabbies because, although the markings are black, the background color is brownish. The background color can vary in hue across a large range. While Chausie breeders try to avoid producing the very reddish brown background color seen in the Abyssinian breed, they do produce everything else in the range. Background color may be reddish gold, it may be a light golden brown, warm beige, cold beige, and even a very cool light gray with just a hint of brown in it. The latter is a very wild looking background color. Random polygenes influence the background color. Every time a black ticked tabby kitten is born, breeders start guessing what the background color will be. But no one really knows until the cat matures.
There are various different causes for rapid breathing which may include infections, pain, heart disorders, dehydration among other causes; a cat’s respiration should be below 30 breaths per minute when at rest but if it is significantly above this rate at rest I would suggest visiting your Veterinarian for an examination to determine a cause. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
The first hybrids of the jungle cat (Felis chaus) and the domestic cat (Felis silvestris catus) may have been born in Egypt several thousand years ago.[2] The jungle cat is native to a vast region spanning Southeast Asia, India, and the Middle East (Sunquist, 2002). For the most part, it is an Asian species of wild cat that lives by rivers and lakes. But the species is found in one small area of North Africa: the Nile Delta. It is well known that the ancient Egyptians kept domestic cats as pets. Many domestic cat mummies have been found interred in Egyptian temples. What is not so well known is that one other species of cat was occasionally preserved after death via mummification; that was the jungle cat (Malek, 1993). F. chaus is not a timid species; they are known for moving into abandoned buildings and living as happily by irrigation canals as by wild rivers, provided that adequate prey and shrubbery for cover are available. Because domestic cats are likely to have frequently encountered jungle cats along the Nile and occasionally even within their owners' homes, it seems that hybrids of the two species were probably often born there.[3][better source needed]
Without examining Midnight it is difficult to give a diagnosis since lethargy and loss of appetite are vague symptoms common with many different conditions; infections, parasites (regardless of indoor or not), foreign objects, poisoning, spoiled food, injury (fell from somewhere) among many other causes may lead to these symptoms. You should ensure that Midnight is kept hydrated, but if there is no improvement you should visit your Veterinarian for an examination. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Chester was taken in last night for an abscess removal surgery on his neck. I got him back this morning and he is having trouble using his litter box. are there any suggestions to help him use it? also, the vet prescribed 2 antibiotics but no pain reliever for chester. he has a drain in his face and i could only imagine how painful it will be for the next few days until he gets it removed. i was told that chester was given a pain medication shot. how long is this supposed to last? it doesn't seem humane to let him go back home without the necessary pain relief medication. In addition, his breathing is quite fast. is that normal for a post abscess removal surgery?
Thoracic drainage tubes to remove fluids from the pleural cavity. Local anesthesia and IV sedation are administered to keep your cat comfortable during this procedure. Tubes will be flushed several times a day with 0.9% saline or lactated Ringers solution warmed to body temperature to wash the chest cavity (pleural lavage). Tubes will need to remain in place for between 4-6 days.
If Chester’s respiratory rate is over 100 breaths per minute you should visit your Veterinarian immediate for an examination since this is well over physiological range; infections, anaemia, allergies, congenital anomalies, foreign objects, fluid, parasites among other causes may be the underlying cause. I cannot give you any at home advice in a case this severe except to visit a Veterinarian for a thorough examination. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
Little is known about the origin of the Russian Blue breed, though stories are legendary. Many believe the Russian Blue is a natural breed originating from the Archangel Isles in northern Russia, where the long winters developed a cat with a dense, plush coat. Rumors also abound that the Russian Blue breed descended from the cats kept by the Russian Czars. Assuming the Russian Blue did migrate from northern Russia, it was likely via ship to England and northern Europe in the mid 1860s.
My cat was run over nearly a month ago. She had her tail amputated. She then come home and developed a lump in her belly. She went back to the vets and had surgery the lump was removed and sent to the lab for testing. It come back with relation to trauma of the car accident. Then last Friday i took her cone off to eat her dinner i went upstairs to have a shower and left her unattended when i come down her cut and drain marks were bleeding. I took her back to the vets who cleaned her up and sent us home! Sunday i noticed she was very quiet and not herself. I took her to the vets last night and she was shaking and her breathing was up at 48 breathes per minute! the vet gave her a 2 week antibiotic injection and has sent us home! today Wednesday i measured her breathing again and it is still at 48 a minute. I have called the vet and said that if she is still the same tomorrow then bring her back. How long does it take for the antibiotic to start working and will this then slow her breathing down? Thank you in advance
Any breathing difficulty should be seen by a Veterinarian regardless of cost since I cannot narrow in on a specific cause without examining Emilee thoroughly; there are many possible causes from airway inflammation, foreign objects to respiratory tract infections (among other causes). You should place Emilee in the bathroom with you whilst you shower in case there is mucus which may be loosened; but a visit to a Veterinarian, charity clinic or other organisation would be best. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
Hybrids have always been popular. They make people feel connected with the wilderness outside. We can’t all own lions and tigers (nor should we), but so many people want little felines that resemble their larger, exotic cousins. Some breeders have begun breeding smaller wild species with domestic cats to create beautiful hybrids that are safe for the average cat owner to live with. Although hybrids are still controversial, there is no denying how unique and beautiful they are. Take a look at the most popular hybrids below.
At the top of the list we find the Savannah F-1. This cat is HUGE. Its a bit of a cheater, its a domestic cat, but with a wild background. A Siamese cat was crossbred with an African (wild) Serval cat. This breed has only recently been accepted as an official breed, and its probably the large domestic kitty around. The Savannah can get as big as a good sized dog and you better not mess with this puss. Unlike many other cats, Savannah’s usually love water, can be walked on a leash and come close to dogs in behavior. Most Savannah owners report that they are very gently and loyal companions, but don’t forget that this domestic cat can still be  “wild” at heart. Not bad for a house cat!
But people jump the gun saying oh no its the exotic in them. Ive even heard of non-educated self claimed breeders that its just the exotic. NO it was the breeder not raising the cat right to begin with then blame the breed. MANY people do the right thing but they charge more than backyard mills, unfortunately people just see price which I understand to an extent.
Without examining Potchi, I cannot cannot confirm whether or not she has a fever; rapid breathing and shivering may be due to a variety of different conditions including infections, trauma, pain among others. You should keep an eye on her, but due to her young age I would recommend visiting your Veterinarian for an examination to be on the safe side. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
When the Russian Blue cat sees his favorite family member, though, it’s a whole different matter. This cat will follow the individual around the whole house and can sometimes hitch a ride on that person’s shoulder. The Foreign Blue greets the owner at the door and is sensitive to your mood, i.e., with playtime or just by settling down next to you. Owners rarely hear the cat’s voice unless it’s mealtime. Some of the things an Archangel Blue appreciates are a hearty game of fetch, a window with a great outdoor view and pats on the head.
Hi! My cat squeakers has always been breathing faster than normal. Our other cats only do it after playing and running around. She seems to have been breathing like this for her whole life. She doesn’t display any other concerning symptoms at all. She’s eating and drinking normally. She gets in exercise when she plays and she’s still her old self. I’m wondering if it would be best to take her to a vet? Or maybe is it just normal for her?
Four of the five species of the big cats (the Panthera genus – lion, tiger, leopard, jaguar and snow leopard), the exception being the snow leopard can hybridize with each other to produce numerous hybrids. In fact, breeding of two different pantheras to produce hybrid big cats has been banned in many zoos and animal sanctuaries due to no conservation value of the hybrid, and the risk it poses on the mother that gives birth to it.
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