It’s human nature to become a creature of habit. However, there’s no room for health practioners to be complacent or lack empathic best practices. Your vet (and even your own doctor) should readily give you a plan that prepares you for multiple scenarios with situational based set of instructions of what to look for and what to do if things change. That said, the patients also have the responsibility of participating in the process. This can include keeping them on point by being their supervisor, so-to-speak, during the visit and making sure they do everything they’re supposed to do.
My cat just gave birth to 4 beautiful kittens but after her labor she started breathing rapidly. It has been 8 hours since, and she is still breathing rapidly and now she is also opening her mouth while sticking her tongue out. she already ate twice and drank lots of water but since her labor she hasn't done the restroom, I believe she is straining and now im very worried for her. what can be happening with her? what can I do?
There are good and bad with everything. The genetic code is being increased with more offspring from more individual tigers, you will have a stronger genetic code. The question is animal quality of life. But ask yourself this. If a tiger is brought into the world to an abusive trainer, would that tiger rather be unborn? Hopefully we can rescue them when they are abused, but a living being is precious and always wanted in this world.
There are many different options for analgesia in cats, however without knowing which medication was provided for pain relief I cannot give you an indication of how long it would be effective for as we have many different products on the market with different active ingredients, mechanisms of action and duration. A respiratory rate above 35 or 40 breaths per minute is expected as a result of discomfort or pain, but without examining Chester or knowing what was administered I cannot give you any specific information. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
Thoracic drainage tubes to remove fluids from the pleural cavity. Local anesthesia and IV sedation are administered to keep your cat comfortable during this procedure. Tubes will be flushed several times a day with 0.9% saline or lactated Ringers solution warmed to body temperature to wash the chest cavity (pleural lavage). Tubes will need to remain in place for between 4-6 days.

My cat isn't eating his treats which is VERY unusual for him. He's sitting like he's uncomfortable or ready to dash. He's also making a very weird, low noise almost like an attempt at a growl or purr but it isn't quite there. I also noticed he is breathing rather quickly. The article I read here said 20-30 breaths a minute and it looks like he's doing 40 in 30 seconds. His gums don't look pale or blue. Just the normal pink. His nose is still cold too. I haven't seen blood anywhere on him or in his litter box. It also seems like he hasn't vomited at all either.


Although an immediate improvement in the bloodline was made when Russian Blues were imported from Britain, it would take years to establish the exact type that would personify the Russian Blue. Breeders were breeding traits into their lines based on their own preferences, so that their Blues would be splendid in one area, but never overall. The breed was too varied, with some exhibiting pale, exquisitely plush coats, and others showing elegant bodies, beautifully shaped heads, and striking green eyes.

We have a 12 year old cat that is breathing hard and rapidly. about 6 weeks ago he got stepped on and the breathing rapid started about 2 days later. We took him to the vet. They did xrays and blood work. Said his back was bruised and gave him antibotics, steroid shot, and pain meds. He was fine for about 3 weeks then started breathing hard again. This time we took him back they said he had a cats nail stuck in his neck. Gave him a steroid shot and he was fine for 2 weeks. Took him back 3rd time and they gave him a steroid shot.This time it didnt help. Took him to a different vet. They looked at his blood work and took xrays. Said he either had cancer or fungus on his lungs. They were swolen. He is on his second week of antibotics and anti-fugal meds. Really breathing hard but not panting. Not sure if he's suffering or how to tell.


A loss of appetite and lethargy are both vague symptoms but the rapid breathing is concerning, you should visit your Veterinarian for an examination as rapid breathing may be associated with pain, anaemia, heart disease among many other conditions. Without examining Ozzy I cannot determine the specific underlying cause of the symptoms and would recommend that a visit to your Veterinarian be made before the weekend. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
Lulu may be displaying perfectly normal behavior for an increase in temperature, or she may be having a problem. Without examining her, I have a hard time commenting on whether she is okay, but if she is acting normally otherwise, you may be fine to monitor her. If she continues to have rapid shallow breathing or seems to have problems catching her breath, it would be best to have her examined by a veterinarian.
Without examining Kujo it is difficult to say specifically what the cause for panting is; sometimes there may be side effects from vaccines and other treatments but are self limiting and resolve themselves pretty quickly without veterinary intervention. However, if Kujo is struggling to breathe or there is no improvement you should return to your Veterinarian to be on the safe side. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

The Ocicat was named for its resemblance to an ocelot, but it has no actual ocelot, or any wild cat, in its family tree—at least since the breed was developed in 1964. Only its appearance earned it a spot on this list. Virginia Daly, a longtime Michigan cat breeder, was trying to get a Siamese cat with Abyssinian points. She bred together cats with Abyssinian, Siamese, and American shorthair lineages. A kitten named Tonga resulted, which had ivory-colored fur with golden spots. Tonga was not used for breeding, but the same parents later produced kittens with the same markings. Ocicats come in a variety of colors, but are known for their spots. The breed standards say an Ocicat should be heavier than it appears and be well-muscled. Ocicats are sociable and their behavior may remind you of a dog—such as the way many like to play fetch. The Ocicat is recognized by TICA as a championship breed. 
We have a female persian cat and was diagnosed of cancer last December. Operation was scheduled right away but when the vet saw cancer cells spread all over he did not remove any of these cancer cells. So what we did, were are giving her turmeric everyday hoping it would help her in a way. It’s 5 months since then and i thought Cindy, name of our cat will continue to be well. But, something unusual i noticed, she is breathing rapidly and her appetite to eat lessen. Actually, she wants to eat but she can’t swallow the food. It breaks my heart to see her suffering difficulty in breathing. Is my cat dying? What medicine to give her to ease her breathing? Please advise. Vilma
Pleural effusion is an abnormal buildup of fluid up in the pleural cavity, the thin fluid-filled space that lies between the lungs and the chest wall. It is a symptom, with an underlying disorder causing this fluid to build up. The buildup of excess fluid leads to difficulty breathing, due to the inability of the lungs to fully expand. Causes include congestive heart failure, liver failure, fluid overload, blood clotting disorders (usually due to ingestion of rat poison), lung lobe torsion, pulmonary edema, and diaphragmatic hernia.
My cat seems to have rapid breathing, I can see her stomach area rising and falling as she sleeps. I tried to take her breathing rate and got 60-65 per minute. She is grooming herself more than usual. She has always been skittish, her eating is normal, and she has had normal bladder and bowel functions. I have a hard time getting her into a carrier so I do not take her to the vet often. I am in an area that is getting prepared for a powerful nor'easter, so I can't get her to a vet for a few days. Should I be worried? What can I do?
Thank you for your email. Without seeing Sharleen, I can't recommend any medication or therapies for her, and many OTC pain medications are toxic to cats. Your veterinarian will be able to recommend something for her discomfort since they have seen her and know her history. It would be a great idea to call them and let them know that you think she is in pain, and follow any recommendations that they may have. I hope that everything goes well for her.
Breathing rates may change for a variety of reasons and in some sleeping positions the airway may be slightly occluded which may result in altered breathing but without examining Kiki I cannot say for certain whether it is something to be concerned about or not. As for drinking, some cats may drink less that are on a wet food diet but you should ensure that she is keeping hydrated; you should visit your Veterinarian for a general check about the breathing and they can also check the hydration too. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
Adding to the captivating physical qualities of this breed is the eye color. The eyes are yellow while the Russian Blue is a kitten, and by four months there is a bright green ring around the pupil. As the cat matures, the eye color graduates into a bright, vivid green, aesthetically intensifying the already remarkable blue-silver coloring of the cat. The eyes are wide set and round, and only slightly slanted at the upper corners, giving the Russian Blue a sweet expression that matches well with its gentle temperament.
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