Do your research. Bengals, Savannahs and many other hybrids even removed from the original crosses can be bad bad bad cats to have. Why risk a hybrid wild animal when you can get domestics that look just as amazing? Example: Ocicat; Egyptian Mau; if you are looking for wild looking cats. Classic Bombay cats look like black panthers; pixie bobs (some say are hybrids but its bunk) and highlanders are wild looking cats but not wild in the slightest. Many were made from regular domestic crosses with purebreds and/or landrace natural breeds etc. Look around, use wikipedia. Check out the cat fancy sites. There are domestics for everyone. Most are cheaper too. Wild animals/hybrids are like leaving a loaded pistol on your computer desk. You just never know for sure what can happen. Domestics can be unpredictable in the right circumstances, why add in a wild/hybrid factor and possibly endanger people and other pets around you? Would you want to carry that guilt the rest of your life?
Temperament: The Russian Blue is a distinguished, reserved, sweet cat. They make wonderful, loving companions but they may be reluctant to be social with people other than their family. They will bond with you and become fiercely loyal. Often, Russian Blues want to be right where you are, at all times. They will follow you around, helping you with whatever tasks you need to do and will happily snuggle up when it is time to rest. They do enjoy games and particularly love to teach their human counterparts how to fetch. They are playful and get along well with children who are gentle and treat them with respect. They are great pets and wonderful companions for families and will quickly wiggle their way into everyone's hearts.
The domestic short-haired and domestic long-haired cat types are not breeds, but terms used (with various spellings) in the cat fancy to describe mongrel cats of a general type, by coat length, that do not belong to a particular breed. Some registries permit them to be pedigreed and they have been used as foundation stock in the establishment of some breeds. They should not be confused with standardized breeds with similar names, such as British Shorthair and Oriental Longhair.
There are various causes for rapid breathing with pain being a common cause; infections, foreign bodies, heart conditions, allergies among other conditions may also cause rapid breathing. It may be worth trying to get Possum into the bathroom whilst you take a shower to see if the warm humid air helps to open her airway; otherwise we are a little bit stuck for a cause. If the cause was due to a blocked nose, your Veterinarian would have detected that on the physical examination. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
A cat shouldn’t be breathing more than around 40 breaths per minute when at rest, if her breathing is above this rate then it may be indicative of something going on. An increase in breathing may be due to infections, heart disease, cancer, pleural effusion, allergies among other causes; given Smudge’s age, I would have your Veterinarian take a look at her to be on the safe side. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
Care: Russian Blue cats are fairly easy to care for. Their coats simply need to be brushed once a week so that they stay can show off their beautiful blue color. They may require more brushing when they are going through a season of shedding. Trim their nails and clean their ears as needed to keep them looking lovely. And, as with any cat, it is important to regularly brush their teeth to prevent periodontal disease. If you are looking for a hypoallergenic cat then the Russian Blue cat is a great candidate. They produce less of the Fel D1 protein which is the true cause for your allergic reaction. There is no cat that is 100% allergy free so increasing the frequency of grooming and bathing your furry friend will also help.
In 1871 a Russian Blue was shown at the first cat show at the Crystal Palace in London, under the name Archangel Cat. At this point, Russian Blues were shorthaired, solid blue felines with foreign body types. From photos and published sources of the time, the original coat was thick, dense, glossy, and colored a light silver-blue. Russian Blues competed in the same class with all other shorthaired blues, despite obvious differences in type. Since the round-headed, cobby British Blues were favored in the show halls, the slender Russian Blues rarely won.
While asthma would be helped by albuterol if this were related to heart disease then albuterol can be contraindicated, as it may raise an already fast heart rate making her heart function even more inefficient. I understand that you were trying to do anything to help but I don't recommend starting therapy without a better idea of what her primary problem is.
Thank you for your email. Since Tortie was just seen by your veterinarian and was deemed healthy, her periodic bouts of rapid breathing may be normal, and may follow bouts of exertion or anxiety. If the periods that she is breathing rapidly become more frequent, or more severe, it would be a good idea to have her seen by your veterinarian and examined to make sure that she is okay. It might be helpful to video the episode, since she doesn't seem to breathe that way when she is at an appointment. I hope that she is okay!
If Penny’s resting respiratory rate is above 40 breaths per minute, you should visit your Veterinarian for an examination; even if her bloodwork was good six weeks ago, something may have changed in that time. Without examining her and listing to her breathing and heart, I cannot start to narrow in on a specific cause; however the groaning is also concerning. Your Veterinarian will check her over and will treat is required. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
My cat is about 9 years old, and about two days ago his breathing started to become very rapid at about 60-80 breaths per minute. He is eating properly and acting normally and doesn't appear to be in pain. Is there any reason this could be as this hasn't happened to any of our previous cats. He is also very healthy and has only gone to the vets for mess once for a urine infection he always has the de wormer and the anti flea drops as well as his vaccines
Those animals were then bred indiscriminately, and many purposely inbred for traits such as white coats, tiny size, and docile (read retarded) temperament. None of the exotic cats in wild hands can be traced back to the wild, other than local cats, cougars and bobcats, who may have been snatched from the wild in the U.S. For that reason they can never be bred for introduction back to the wild.
Lots of places claim to be breeding cats to save them from extinction when in fact they are not involved in any real conservation effort and rather are justifying their breeding to have babies who will bring in paying visitors and worse yet to sell.  Many people contact us each week saying they want to start a captive breeding program to save the cats from extinction, but the only viable programs currently being operated in such a manner as to accommodate this goal are being run by accredited zoos who will not work with the private sector.  Unless you can trace your cat’s pedigree all the way back to the wild and you have been accepted into the Species Survival Plan for that specific breed, you will not be aiding conservation, but rather will be contributing to the over abundance of unwanted animals.

Adding to the captivating physical qualities of this breed is the eye color. The eyes are yellow while the Russian Blue is a kitten, and by four months there is a bright green ring around the pupil. As the cat matures, the eye color graduates into a bright, vivid green, aesthetically intensifying the already remarkable blue-silver coloring of the cat. The eyes are wide set and round, and only slightly slanted at the upper corners, giving the Russian Blue a sweet expression that matches well with its gentle temperament.
Sharleen ear temperature change hot to cold 4 times overnight. Sound stuffy when purr. Breath heavily and urinate lots and often last few weeks. Took her to the vet for blood work and check up today. She seem worse and in pain. Lower lip is now swollen, right front leg a little limping. Not active all afternoon. Night fall and she seem restless. What can I do to ease her pain while waiting for blood work result?
11 month old kitten with rapid breathing since we got him at 3 months old. Acting normal, voiding without issue, playing, eating and drinking. Normal behaviors. As a nurse myself I always questioned his fast breathing but because he is a kitten I let it slide thinking that maybe they, like babies/children have faster respiratory rates. He is half tabby half Maine coon and is about 12-13lbs. His respiratory rate at rest is about 75-85. He has only panted about 3 times that we’ve seen during intense play time with our other cat. No coughing or runny nose. I’m very worried now that he is approaching a year old. I’ve been through the ringer with expensive tests at the vet with another cat and I’m wondering what are the baseline tests for this that I can start with that could lead to answers? And what are the most common diagnosises with rapid breathing being the only symptom? Thoughts and many thanks in advance!
Allergy medicine wouldn’t help here, it may be a case that the beef tendon is causing pain or an obstruction for Kingston which may explain his posture of sitting and his increased respiratory rate. I would keep an eye on him, but if there is no improvement within a few hours I would recommend taking him into your Veterinarian for an examination; I wouldn’t induce vomiting since if there is an obstruction this may cause more pain and distress for him. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
There are other reasons, in the real world, why it doesn’t work, which includes the fact that human – big cat conflict is one of the main reasons cats are wiped out of areas. Captive breeding not only selectively chooses animals that are least fit for the wild but also conditions the cats to not fear humans. That increases the conflict and the result is that not only would the offending cat be killed, but likely any wild cat seen in the area would be hunted down and killed in a case of mistaken identity. That escalates the extinction of cats in the wild.

As the CFA further explains, the Russian blue cat made its first public appearance in 1875 in a very regal way: exhibited at London's Crystal Palace as the "Archangel Cat." The Crystal Palace was constructed under the leadership of Prince Albert, husband of Queen Victoria, as the location of The Great Exhibition in 1851 and thereafter was used to exhibit items of interest (living and otherwise) to the people of Victorian London, and the attractions held international appeal as well. By middle of the nineteenth century, "cat shows" had become regular and popular events.
Conservation is a very complex issue and captive settings cannot duplicate it, so the important work of saving entire eco systems is not taught and not done in a captive setting. What’s worse is that lip service is paid to these worthy objectives and when you pay to see captive wildlife you walk away thinking you did something good when in fact you contributed to the problem. You paid to see a cat in a cage. You made sure that industry continues to breed and exploit more cats. You did not pay to save the wild and all of the wonderous and magnifient creatures who call it home. You put another nail in the coffin for the planet.
Los Angeles cat breeder Judy Sugden has been working since the late eighties to breed a house cat that resembles a tiger. The result is the Toyger, a registered breed that has a lineage beginning with domestic shorthairs and Bengals selected for their markings. Toygers are now available from breeders all over the world. The breed is still in development, and TICA now has the toyger classified as a championship breed. 
Blood transfusion for acutely anemic cats or cats who have suffered significant blood loss or kittens who have neonatal isoerythrolysis. Blood typing must be carried out before a blood transfusion. Cats have three blood types, Type A, Type B and Type AB.  Type A cats can only receive type A blood, Type B cats can only receive type B blood, and Type AB cats can receive blood from type AB blood or type A blood.
Hybrids have always been popular. They make people feel connected with the wilderness outside. We can’t all own lions and tigers (nor should we), but so many people want little felines that resemble their larger, exotic cousins. Some breeders have begun breeding smaller wild species with domestic cats to create beautiful hybrids that are safe for the average cat owner to live with. Although hybrids are still controversial, there is no denying how unique and beautiful they are. Take a look at the most popular hybrids below.
Below are some zoos and pseudo sanctuaries in Florida.  These places breed and sell while lying to the public and saying they are doing it for conservation.  The file is large, so you may have to wait a bit for it to load fully and then hit play again. These are the ones that are open to the public. Many are much worse, but do not allow the public in to film.
Diagnosis of rapid breathing in your cat will require your veterinarian to determine the underlying cause. This will involve diagnostic tests that may not seem related to breathing, such as blood work, urinalysis and other extensive systemic exams. Given the lengthy list of potential conditions, it will be important for you to provide your veterinarian with a thorough physical and medical history of your cat. If your cat is allowed outdoors, has recently suffered from a traumatic injury, or could potentially have fallen from a high surface, this will be important information to help identify potential trauma or pain. You should also provide your vet with a history of progression of symptoms such as approximate time of onset and any worsening or improvement. This will help your veterinarian narrow down potential causes.
Hello, I adopted a cat 6 months ago and he is almost 1 now. Ever since I got him, he has breathed fast and noisy. He was treated for URI’s a couple times and lung worms once. There was slight improvement when he was being treated with Panacur and prednisolone, but it is back to it’s fast pace. He is otherwise normal, eating and drinking fine (maybe eating too much..), playing fine. He sleeps a lot during the day but then will be a wild hyper cat after I get home from work. He doesn’t open mouth breathe (except once after laser play), no coughing or vomit. His poo however is extremely stinky and greasy looking. He is not in pain. He is about 13 pounds and he eats Iams Indoor dry food and Blue Buffalo wet food. Any suggestions? My vet is at a loss.
In 1912 the Foreign Blue, one of the breed’s early names, warranted their own class and finally got separated from the blue cats variety. Progress of the cat’s popularity was halted, with the breed coming dangerously close to extinction during the onset of World War II. Breeders tried to revive the line by crossing the Russian Blue to Bluepoint Siamese and British Blues. Scandinavian breeders tried the same using Finland blue cats and Siamese blues.
×