We have a female persian cat and was diagnosed of cancer last December. Operation was scheduled right away but when the vet saw cancer cells spread all over he did not remove any of these cancer cells. So what we did, were are giving her turmeric everyday hoping it would help her in a way. It’s 5 months since then and i thought Cindy, name of our cat will continue to be well. But, something unusual i noticed, she is breathing rapidly and her appetite to eat lessen. Actually, she wants to eat but she can’t swallow the food. It breaks my heart to see her suffering difficulty in breathing. Is my cat dying? What medicine to give her to ease her breathing? Please advise. Vilma
My fiance said the he saw her eat this afternoon, so that is a relief. Her gums are pink (that's one of the first things I looked at on her and I should've told you that...but... this is my BABY CAT and she has me a little panicked!.. not like dealing with humans on the ambulance... she's innocent!) I do have access to oxygen... so we can make her an oxygen tent if it's necessary. Right now, she is getting up every couple of minutes and repositioning or pacing.. her respiration rate is around 50 right now... her belly almost looks like it's spasming and her heart rate is running between 80 and 90 everytime we take it... which is low... what do you suggest??????
My 4 year old cat,yuri,had diaherria and vomited after she vomited she started to breathe rapidly and acted uneasey we thought maybe she has heatstroke so we cooled her off and after that we thought she was OK but we did not realize later that she was still breathing rapidly and acting lethargic the whole day ,she also hasn't eaten anything at since morning and has drank very little water ,I've been very worried and been thinking to take her to the vet tomorrow morning ,just hoping you guys would give us some advice for the night
The litter box should always be clean at all times and placed in an optimal location. Scoop out the waste daily and change the litter box twice a week or more if you have the time. Place the litter box in a low foot traffic area and not anywhere near where you feed him. If you’re not too fond on litter boxes you can train your Foreign Blue to use a spare toilet, which is as good as any litter box in the market.
We have a female persian cat and was diagnosed of cancer last December. Operation was scheduled right away but when the vet saw cancer cells spread all over he did not remove any of these cancer cells. So what we did, were are giving her turmeric everyday hoping it would help her in a way. It’s 5 months since then and i thought Cindy, name of our cat will continue to be well. But, something unusual i noticed, she is breathing rapidly and her appetite to eat lessen. Actually, she wants to eat but she can’t swallow the food. It breaks my heart to see her suffering difficulty in breathing. Is my cat dying? What medicine to give her to ease her breathing? Please advise. Vilma

Russian blue cats are highly intelligent animals and require physical and mental stimulation, so it's important to give them access to toys at all times. They retain a strong hunting instinct, so a feathered fishing pole toy is the perfect plaything. Consider storing these types of toys in a cat-proof spot because: (a) your kitty will tear it to shreds, and (b) she may eat the feathers and/or the string, neither of which are good for her digestive system or overall health.
An increase in respiratory rate may be an indicator of pain especially if she is limping; without examining Isabella I cannot say whether this is due to pain or another cause (infection, heart disease etc…). I would restrict Isabella’s movements and monitor her for the time being but if it continues or the respiratory rate is above 40 breaths per minute you should visit your Veterinarian for an examination. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
The Russian Blue has a reputation as a gentle, quiet cat, somewhat shy, but don’t get the wrong idea. This cat may have a reserved nature, but he loves to play (being especially fond of retrieving) and enjoys jumping or climbing to high places where he can study people and situations at his leisure before making up his mind about whether he wants to get involved. Guests will not receive his immediate attention and may never see him unless he decides they are worthy of his notice, but toward family members, especially his favored person, he is ever loyal, following them through the house and even riding on a shoulder. The Russian Blue is a sensitive cat who doesn’t like to be ignored and will be hurt if he doesn’t receive the same amount of affection he gives. Lack of attention can cause him to become anxious or fearful.

Thanks for your advice. I wanted to give recovery feedback. So the symptoms are still going on. I took her to the vet for a control and the vet told me she doesnt hear anything wrong with her breathing, and the palate healed already. The vet thinks the symptoms are from the hot weather. And the blinking ete just happens sometimes, nothing to worry about. I continue watching her, hoping everything will go back to normal.


A cat may have rapid breathing for a variety of different reasons which may include infections, pain, high temperature (to cool down), heart failure among other causes; if your Veterinarian was unable to identify a cause, you should keep a close eye on Skittle and see if there is anything which occurs before an episode as it may be a reaction to anxiety from something. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
By 1965, British breeders expressed unhappiness over the abrupt change in the Russian Blue's shape and personality, and immediately began an effort to bring back the original Russian Blue. By breeding the Scandinavian cats, known for their good head type and vivid green eye color, with the British Russian Blues, a cat with a silver-blue coat color and graceful body style, the breeders finally achieved what they were looking for.
It sounds like Arwen has some nerve damage to the plexus of nerves supplying the fore leg, this may be due to bruising or avulsion, you should visit your Veterinarian as soon as possible for an examination to determine the cause and the severity. There isn’t anything I can recommend for you to do at home for this condition. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
Little is known about the origin of the Russian Blue breed, though stories are legendary. Many believe the Russian Blue is a natural breed originating from the Archangel Isles in northern Russia, where the long winters developed a cat with a dense, plush coat. Rumors also abound that the Russian Blue breed descended from the cats kept by the Russian Czars. Assuming the Russian Blue did migrate from northern Russia, it was likely via ship to England and northern Europe in the mid 1860s.
Because they are easily startled, it’s best to keep equipment and devices that make loud noises, i.e., vacuum cleaners, blenders and such tucked away in a storage or a corner spot in the house. When this happens, scoop up your cat, place them in a quiet, safe spot and reassure him. Allocate a quiet space for your cat as sort of “sanctuary” so they can retreat as needed.

Although an immediate improvement in the bloodline was made when Russian Blues were imported from Britain, it would take years to establish the exact type that would personify the Russian Blue. Breeders were breeding traits into their lines based on their own preferences, so that their Blues would be splendid in one area, but never overall. The breed was too varied, with some exhibiting pale, exquisitely plush coats, and others showing elegant bodies, beautifully shaped heads, and striking green eyes.
Russian Blue cats can take care of and amuse themselves when their owners are away or preoccupied, but they do expect a lot of “me” time and play when you or your family members get home. Moreover, this breed doesn’t like to be ignored and demands equal affection from the one he or she gives. The cat can become overly anxious, stressed or fearful if you don’t pay attention for long periods of time.
Currently, most authentic Chausies produced are late generation cats with fully domestic temperaments. Their TICA registration certificates will usually indicate that they are "C" generation or "SBT," which nearly always means they are four generations or more beyond the jungle cat (F. chaus). In cases where they are "A" or "B" generation, it is usually because they have been recently outcrossed to another domestic breed to improve specific cosmetic traits, but the cats are nonetheless more than four generations beyond the handful of nondomestic ancestors.
My 2 year old female (not spayed) cat has had strange breathing since she was a kitten (a few month old) it started when I went on holiday and left her at home with my partner. When she’s active or sleeping her breathing is normal but it’s when she’s just resting and especially purring her breathing is quite fast and he stomach is visablly moving quickly. She is healthy and has never had any accidents or anything traumatic. She drinks well, goes to the toilet fine, she’s a fussy eater but does eat (so not really worrying) she’s very active, love she climbing and playing and running around. Her breathing is just really unusual when she’s resting. It’s like her whole body is moving with her breaths. In my opinion it’s like her little lungs are having to work hard to get the oxygen in however she doesn’t show any signs or symptoms of being unwell.
Pyothorax (pleural empyema) is the presence of pus in the pleural space in the chest cavity, the thin, fluid-filled space that lies between the lungs and the chest wall. Any pathogenic organism can cause pyothorax including fungal, viral, bacterial or protozoal; however, a bacterial infection is by far the most common pathogen. The collection of pus is due to dead white blood cells and dead bacteria. Common bacteria involved in pyothorax include Pasteurella spp (the most common), Nocardia spp,  Streptococcus spp, Clostridium spp, Proteus spp, Bacteroides spp and Mycoplasma spp.
There are various reasons for an increased respiration rate and without examining Muffin it is difficult to narrow in on a specific cause; infections, pain stimulus, heart conditions, anaemia, poisoning among many other conditions may lead to an increased respiratory rate. If Muffin has a resting respiratory rate of 50 breaths per minute (shouldn’t be above 30 or 35) you should visit your Veterinarian for an examination to determine the underlying cause. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
Oh, she’s blue all right — with a silver cast that electrifies this feline! A diluted version of the gene responsible for black hair is what produces the silvery coat seen on the Russian Blue. But that’s not the only thing that keeps her in a class of her own: Her bright green eyes, silky-to-the-touch double-layered coat and lithe body make her one of a kind.
The Russian Blue is not believed to be related to the other three shorthaired solid blue breeds: Thailand’s Korat, France’s Chartreux, and Britain’s British Blue (now called the British Shorthair). The four breeds have distinct differences in coat type, conformation, and personality, although the Korat, Chartreux, and Russian Blue share a similar silver-blue sheen. Since all four of these breeds have been around for so long that their ancestries are shrouded in legend and conjecture, a common ancestor is possible.

My cat seems to have rapid breathing, I can see her stomach area rising and falling as she sleeps. I tried to take her breathing rate and got 60-65 per minute. She is grooming herself more than usual. She has always been skittish, her eating is normal, and she has had normal bladder and bowel functions. I have a hard time getting her into a carrier so I do not take her to the vet often. I am in an area that is getting prepared for a powerful nor'easter, so I can't get her to a vet for a few days. Should I be worried? What can I do?

Thank you for you email. unfortunately, without examining Kai, i can't comment on what might be going on with him. He needs to see his veterinarian to try and determine what is going on with him and how to treat him. If he seems to be in distress and unable to catch his breath, taking him to the emergency clinic tonight is most appropriate. I hope that he is okay.


If the resting respiratory rate is above 40 breaths per minute, you should ideally visit a Veterinarian for an examination as it can be difficult to narrow in on a specific cause; there are a few possible causes for this rapid breathing including infections, laryngeal disorders, pain among other causes. You should visit a Veterinarian as soon as possible for an examination to narrow in on a cause. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

HELLO . I HAVE SEALPOINT HIMALAYAN CAT AND HIS NAME IS CHOCO. I ALWAYS OBSERVE HIS BREATHING AND IT LOOK LIKE HIS SNOORING ALL THE TIME ESPECIALLY WHEN HE IS ASLEEP. I ALSO NOTICE THAT EVERYTIME HE GOES TO SLEEP, HE ALWAYS PUT HIS HEAD ON A PILLOW OR LOOKING UP IN THE CEILING. I ALSO FEEL THERE IS A SMALL CIRCLE AROUND HIS THROAT WHEN I TOUCH IT. I WAS SO DEEPLY BROKE EVERYTIME I THINK ABOUT MY LITTLE CHOCO's CONDITION . DO YOU HAVE ANY IDEAS ABOUT MY CONCERN? THIS WILL BE A BIG HELP FOR ME MY FRIEND. THANK YOU SO MUCH !!!!
Allergy medicine wouldn’t help here, it may be a case that the beef tendon is causing pain or an obstruction for Kingston which may explain his posture of sitting and his increased respiratory rate. I would keep an eye on him, but if there is no improvement within a few hours I would recommend taking him into your Veterinarian for an examination; I wouldn’t induce vomiting since if there is an obstruction this may cause more pain and distress for him. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
Allergies taking a toll on you? If you’re longing to have a cat, despite your allergies, there are few “hypoallergenic” breeds known to produce fewer allergens than other cats. Key among these is the Russian Blue Cat. Being one of the few hypoallergenic cat breeds out there, the Russian Blue is considered extremely special. This translates into the Russian Blue Breed being one of the rarest cat breeds. You can view our available Hypoallergenic Kittens for sale and contact us once you intend to adopt. Getting a hypoallergenic Russian Blue Kitten for sale is a great option for cat owners who have allergies.
As with all non-domestic hybrid source breeds, some Chausies may inherit intestinal tracts similar to that of the non-domestic ancestors. The intestinal tract may be a little shorter than that of the traditional domestic cat. A shorter intestinal tract is thought to be less capable of processing ingredients derived from plants. That would include any kind of cereal, as well as vegetables, herbs, and spices. Those ingredients may serve as triggers for chronic intestinal inflammation and eventually lead to chronic inflammatory bowel disease that is perpetuated by multiple allergies to proteins in commercial cat food.[9] Regardless of the cause, Chausies do seem somewhat prone to developing food allergies. To prevent this, breeders advise Chausie owners to feed only very high quality commercial cat foods, containing as little of plant-derived ingredients as possible or advise feeding homemade raw or cooked meat diets with appropriate supplementation. If homemade diets are fed, it should be with the guidance of someone experienced in preparing them, because meat by itself does not contain all the nutrients that Chausies require.
The first Savannah hybrid was born in 1986 and named Savannah by breeder Judee Frank. That cat's traits inspired Patrick Kelly to team with Joyce Sroufe to develop the breed. A Savannah is the largest of all domestic cats, can leap great distances, and is illegal to own in some states. They are intelligent, curious, and often remind their owners of a dog. The International Cat Association (TICA) recognizes Savannahs as a championship breed. 

Don’t let the powerful, sleek features of the Foreign Blue fool you. This breed is generally shy, quiet and very gentle by nature. It’s more reserved than playful but that doesn’t mean the breed enjoys a good romp every now and then. The Russian Blue is intelligent and leans towards games that have a “throw and catch” mechanism. You’ll soon find yourself playing an endless game of fetch if you’re not careful! They are also attracted by sunbeams, laser pointers and love to go chase their favorite toys.
The physical appearance of the Archangel is so appealing that you, family members and guests will be drawn to the feline right away. The silver-tinged blue coat, accompanied by intelligent, slightly sloped green eyes add elegance and ambiance to any room. Once you get to know your cat and the Foreign Blue accepts, then it becomes evident that they make the perfect pets. Their intelligent and playful nature will go a long way towards a fulfilling relationship in any household.
The Russian Blue is robust, marked by strong sinews, a velvety fur and fine outlines. This breed is closely related to 3 other cat breeds, namely the British Blue (or the British Shorthair), the French Chartreux and Thailand Korat because they share the same hue and have short hair, but the similarity ends there. Each of the aforementioned blue breeds have their own fun personality and coat characteristics.
There are good and bad with everything. The genetic code is being increased with more offspring from more individual tigers, you will have a stronger genetic code. The question is animal quality of life. But ask yourself this. If a tiger is brought into the world to an abusive trainer, would that tiger rather be unborn? Hopefully we can rescue them when they are abused, but a living being is precious and always wanted in this world.

Big cats are very aggressive, and will sprint and chase down their prey, this can range from mobs as small as ants, to as large asdeer. This also includes the player. If a big cat is attacked by another mob, it will fight back. Like bears, big cats will attack other mobs when hungry. Once a big cat has made a kill, it will be satisfied and will not be aggressive until it is hungry again. Tamed big cats won't attack each other or other mobs, unless another mob attacks it first.
Temperament: The Russian Blue is a distinguished, reserved, sweet cat. They make wonderful, loving companions but they may be reluctant to be social with people other than their family. They will bond with you and become fiercely loyal. Often, Russian Blues want to be right where you are, at all times. They will follow you around, helping you with whatever tasks you need to do and will happily snuggle up when it is time to rest. They do enjoy games and particularly love to teach their human counterparts how to fetch. They are playful and get along well with children who are gentle and treat them with respect. They are great pets and wonderful companions for families and will quickly wiggle their way into everyone's hearts.
A British cat fancier named Mrs. Carew-Cox began importing the cats in 1890 and bred and showed them through the turn of the century. She described them as having short, silvery fur, large ears, wide-set eyes and lean faces, with sweet, intelligent personalities—in short, much the same as the Russian Blue of today. In 1912, the cats were well enough established that they could be shown in a class of their own instead of being lumped together with other blue cats.
Finally, when breeders began to combine several of these bloodlines, the Russian Blue strengthened in its class. From 1965-1970, the number of registered Russian Blue’s increased exponentially. The "father" of the modern standard Russian Blue was GC Felinest Flying High of Velva. Flying High performed admirably at shows as a kitten, and through his bloodline 21 kittens were produced, with six of them going on to become Grand Champions, two given Distinguished Merit, and one a National Winner -- GC, NW Velva's Blue Viking, which won 7th Best Cat in 1971, and 2nd Best Cat in 1972.

Although the official, permissible outcrosses for the Chausie breed are the Abyssinian and the domestic shorthair (no recognizable breed), in practice any kind of purely domestic outcross can be used. TICA rules only dictate that cats must be a certain number of generations removed from the jungle cat ancestors and have three generations of registered Chausie ancestors to be eligible for competition at shows.[1] Consequently, a variety of breeds, albeit usually lively outgoing breeds (see below), were used to develop the Chausie breed and continue to be used occasionally as outcrosses. This has given the breed a diverse and healthy genetic foundation.


Lethargy and increased respiratory rate are not specific symptoms as they are shared with many conditions; however I’m concerned that they are a common sign that an animal is in pain, but without examining Marilyn I cannot say whether she is in pain or there is another cause for the symptoms. You should visit your Veterinarian for an examination to be on the safe side especially if this has been going on for a day or more. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
Below are some zoos and pseudo sanctuaries in Florida.  These places breed and sell while lying to the public and saying they are doing it for conservation.  The file is large, so you may have to wait a bit for it to load fully and then hit play again. These are the ones that are open to the public. Many are much worse, but do not allow the public in to film. 
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