Sounds like extra fluid. My feline leukemia positive cat was belly breathing about 50 times a minute. I rushed him to the vet who said he had a hemo thorax and removed 200ml frothy blood. He had a tumor that was leaking and compressing lungs. He layed stretched out or up on his elbows. If your cat is belly breathing and breathing upwards of >30 minute-run to the vet! Sadly I put my baby to sleep that day. I had another cat with CHF (congestive heart failure) was treatable with meds. SHe lived a year.


Hello so my cat is around 8 years old and is a outdoor cat. He came in today and is very low energy sitting in the middle of my room on the floor which is very unusual for him. He is breathing very rapidly, and aggressively. He sometimes makes a little noise out of his mouth. So I don’t know if this is something small and I shouldn’t worry, but this is my first day of seeing this symptoms so if it continues then I’ll go see a vet.
A normal healthy cat will take 20-30 regular breaths per minute. The air travels into your cat’s lungs and is used to oxygenate the blood, which is then circulated throughout your cat’s vital organs. When a cat is suffering from rapid breathing, this breath rate increases and often becomes irregular, or shallow. This can often be an indication that your cat is not able to bring enough oxygen into the lungs to supply their body’s need. Rapid breathing is a symptom that can be caused by a number of illnesses or injuries. Since regular breathing is vital, if your cat is suffering from rapid breathing (also known as tachypnea) it is a serious and life threatening condition and you should seek immediate veterinary care.
In 1900, Carl Hagenbeck crossed a female leopard with a Bengal tiger. The stillborn offspring had a mixture of spots, rosettes and stripes. Henry Scherren wrote, “A male tiger from Penang served two female Indian leopards, and twice with success. Details are not given and the story concludes somewhat lamely. ‘The leopardess dropped her cubs prematurely, the embryos were in the first stage of development and were scarcely as big as young mice.’ Of the second leopardess there is no mention.”
The Russian Blue appears bigger than it actually is because of its double coat, which is the most eye-catching feature of this breed. Dense, silky, and plush, the hair stands out at a 45-degree angle, allowing you to literally trace patterns into it, where they will remain until you smooth your hand over them. According to some legends, the Russian Blue was at one time the target of hunters, who likened their luxuriant fur to the fur of seals. The coat is bright blue, preferably lavender at the base (root), darkening along the shaft up to the tips of the guard hairs (protective hairs in the topcoat), which are tipped in silver. The coat shimmers with reflective light.
Regardless, you should visit your Veterinarian or an Emergency Veterinarian to examine Gizmo since she should be eating and drinking normally after this routine surgery and the ‘seizure like’ activity is also concerning; the moderate increase in respiration may be due to discomfort from surgery or due to something more serious. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
Hello, I adopted a cat 6 months ago and he is almost 1 now. Ever since I got him, he has breathed fast and noisy. He was treated for URI’s a couple times and lung worms once. There was slight improvement when he was being treated with Panacur and prednisolone, but it is back to it’s fast pace. He is otherwise normal, eating and drinking fine (maybe eating too much..), playing fine. He sleeps a lot during the day but then will be a wild hyper cat after I get home from work. He doesn’t open mouth breathe (except once after laser play), no coughing or vomit. His poo however is extremely stinky and greasy looking. He is not in pain. He is about 13 pounds and he eats Iams Indoor dry food and Blue Buffalo wet food. Any suggestions? My vet is at a loss.
Those animals were then bred indiscriminately, and many purposely inbred for traits such as white coats, tiny size, and docile (read retarded) temperament. None of the exotic cats in wild hands can be traced back to the wild, other than local cats, cougars and bobcats, who may have been snatched from the wild in the U.S. For that reason they can never be bred for introduction back to the wild.
Smooth, medium wedge, neither long and tapering nor short and massive. Muzzle is blunt, and part of the total wedge, without exaggerated pinch or whisker break. Top of skull long and flat in profile, gently descending to slightly above the eyes, and continuing at a slight downward angle in a straight line to the tip of the nose. Medium in length. Length of top-head should be greater than length of nose. The face is broad across the eyes due to wide eyeset and thick fur. Muzzle smooth, flowing wedge without prominent whisker pads or whisker pinches. Neck long and slender, but appearing short due to thick fur and high placement of shoulder blades.

My cat was seen by my vet 2 days ago for lethargy, loss of appetite and rapid breathing. The vet diagnosed a viral or bacterial infection and slight dehydration. She had a temp of 103.4. She was given I.V. fluid, a long acting antibiotic shot and a fever reducer. She's not much better. Should I give the medication more time to work or does she need to be seen again.
I had to take my cat to the vet about a month ago, as she was coughing. The vet had said she was healthy, but he thought the coughing was due to a hair ball. We put her on a medication, but unfortunately the medication has not been working. I'm starting to notice that my cat is having a decreased appetite, and she's not as crazy, happy as normal. I'm concerned that this could be that she's allergic to something, or something is going on with the weather? I'm taking her to the vet on Saturday morning to get a better examination, but I wanted to see if you had any other suggestions, or if you could prepare me. Thank you!
Without an examination and possibly a blood test, it is difficult to say what the cause for Buddy’s symptoms are; however eclampsia is a possible cause and would require immediate attention from a Veterinarian if this is the case. I am not sure about veterinary care in Jordan but I know that there is a veterinary school in Al Ramtha, Irbid, Jordan if that is close to you if you require veterinary care. https://wagwalking.com/cat/condition/eclampsia- www.just.edu.jo/FacultiesandDepartments/FacultyOfVeterinaryMedicine/Pages/Default.aspx
A supposed wildcat hybrid Bobcat (white) x domestic cat, with a further mating with a Highland Lynx to produce the curled ears. However, this is a selectively bred, totally domestic cat (no wild cat blood) that is meant to look like a bobcat. The Alpine lynx has longer hind legs and a large but not round head. The toes are tufted. They are intelligent cats.

Because breeders outcrossed the foundation jungle cats to mostly intelligent, outgoing breeds such as the Abyssinian and Oriental Shorthair, Chausies are intelligent, active, athletic cats. They are often very "busy" as kittens. As adults, they are quieter, but they still retain a playfulness and lifelong curiosity. Chausies do not like to be alone; they need to have other cats as companions or have human company most of the time. Chausies get along well with dogs, too, and will do fine if raised with a canine buddy. Additionally, Chausies form deep bonds with people. They are loyal, and may have difficulty adjusting if re-homed as adults.

The first hybrids of the jungle cat (Felis chaus) and the domestic cat (Felis silvestris catus) may have been born in Egypt several thousand years ago.[2] The jungle cat is native to a vast region spanning Southeast Asia, India, and the Middle East (Sunquist, 2002). For the most part, it is an Asian species of wild cat that lives by rivers and lakes. But the species is found in one small area of North Africa: the Nile Delta. It is well known that the ancient Egyptians kept domestic cats as pets. Many domestic cat mummies have been found interred in Egyptian temples. What is not so well known is that one other species of cat was occasionally preserved after death via mummification; that was the jungle cat (Malek, 1993). F. chaus is not a timid species; they are known for moving into abandoned buildings and living as happily by irrigation canals as by wild rivers, provided that adequate prey and shrubbery for cover are available. Because domestic cats are likely to have frequently encountered jungle cats along the Nile and occasionally even within their owners' homes, it seems that hybrids of the two species were probably often born there.[3][better source needed]

I got a small Siamese cat(with rhinotracheitis), He started to breathe a bit fast (45/50 breath per minutes) and his heart is at 60 bpm. We just moved into a new place, he started breathing fast a week ago when we were buried in boxes. I thought it was stress, but it didn't stop. He still eat and moves everywhere, his attitude didn't change. We were at the vet maybe 3 months ago for pancreatitis and because he started losing balance (Ataxia/Unbalanced Gait) but we never wanted to check it, because of our money issue. We want to bring him to the vet, but what can we expect the result to be with these information?

Domestic cat: This is the term used in veterinary offices on charts to identify cats not known to be of any particular breed. It is usually broken down as some breed registries include a class in some of their shows for Domestic Cats so that you can show off your beautiful kitties and perhaps bring home a ribbon. These cats are sometimes referred to by their hair length: DSH, or domestic shorthair; DMH, or domestic medium hair; and DLH, or domestic long hair.

Sorry to hear your kitty is scratching like that! Does he show any signs of skin infections, fleas, mites, wounds from other cats? The cone could have stressed him further, yes, if he was scratching already because of tension/anxiety. Open sores can get infected, especially when left untreated and scratched further. We would recommend taking your kitty to the vet for a diagnosis. They will be able to provide you the advice and medication your kitty might need. Best wishes!
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