HELLO . I HAVE SEALPOINT HIMALAYAN CAT AND HIS NAME IS CHOCO. I ALWAYS OBSERVE HIS BREATHING AND IT LOOK LIKE HIS SNOORING ALL THE TIME ESPECIALLY WHEN HE IS ASLEEP. I ALSO NOTICE THAT EVERYTIME HE GOES TO SLEEP, HE ALWAYS PUT HIS HEAD ON A PILLOW OR LOOKING UP IN THE CEILING. I ALSO FEEL THERE IS A SMALL CIRCLE AROUND HIS THROAT WHEN I TOUCH IT. I WAS SO DEEPLY BROKE EVERYTIME I THINK ABOUT MY LITTLE CHOCO's CONDITION . DO YOU HAVE ANY IDEAS ABOUT MY CONCERN? THIS WILL BE A BIG HELP FOR ME MY FRIEND. THANK YOU SO MUCH !!!!
Anticoagulants (blood thinners) and antiaggregants (antiplatelet) – These drugs reduce the occurrence of blood clots forming. Anticoagulants work by delaying the clotting of blood; common medications include Warfarin and Heparin. Antiaggregants stop platelets from clumping together to form a plug. Aspirin and clopidogrel are two drugs in this category.

In 1912 the Foreign Blue, one of the breed’s early names, warranted their own class and finally got separated from the blue cats variety. Progress of the cat’s popularity was halted, with the breed coming dangerously close to extinction during the onset of World War II. Breeders tried to revive the line by crossing the Russian Blue to Bluepoint Siamese and British Blues. Scandinavian breeders tried the same using Finland blue cats and Siamese blues.


Without an examination and possibly a blood test, it is difficult to say what the cause for Buddy’s symptoms are; however eclampsia is a possible cause and would require immediate attention from a Veterinarian if this is the case. I am not sure about veterinary care in Jordan but I know that there is a veterinary school in Al Ramtha, Irbid, Jordan if that is close to you if you require veterinary care. https://wagwalking.com/cat/condition/eclampsia- www.just.edu.jo/FacultiesandDepartments/FacultyOfVeterinaryMedicine/Pages/Default.aspx
Russian blue cats are highly intelligent animals and require physical and mental stimulation, so it's important to give them access to toys at all times. They retain a strong hunting instinct, so a feathered fishing pole toy is the perfect plaything. Consider storing these types of toys in a cat-proof spot because: (a) your kitty will tear it to shreds, and (b) she may eat the feathers and/or the string, neither of which are good for her digestive system or overall health.
It is possible that Bone has bronchitis, bacterial or fungal pneumonia, a parasite, or cancer. Any of those things are possible. Since he seems to have improved on the antibiotics and steroid injection, it might be a good idea to have a recheck for him. Your veterinarian may want to recheck x-rays to compare for any improvement, and may be able to give him further treatment.
The Russian blue is a sweet-tempered, loyal cat who will follow her owner everywhere, so don't be surprised if she greets you at the front door! While she has a tendency to attach to one pet parent in particular, she demonstrates affection with her whole family and demands it in return. It's said that Russian blues train their owners rather than the owners training them, a legend that's been proven true time and again.
I got a small Siamese cat(with rhinotracheitis), He started to breathe a bit fast (45/50 breath per minutes) and his heart is at 60 bpm. We just moved into a new place, he started breathing fast a week ago when we were buried in boxes. I thought it was stress, but it didn't stop. He still eat and moves everywhere, his attitude didn't change. We were at the vet maybe 3 months ago for pancreatitis and because he started losing balance (Ataxia/Unbalanced Gait) but we never wanted to check it, because of our money issue. We want to bring him to the vet, but what can we expect the result to be with these information?
A tigon is a hybrid cross between a male tiger (Panthera tigris) and a female lion (Panthera leo). Thus, it has parents with the same genus but of different species. The tigon is not currently as common as the converse hybrid, the liger.The tigon’s genome includes genetic components of both parents. Tigons can exhibit visible characteristics from both parents: they can have both spots from the mother (lions carry genes for spots—lion cubs are spotted and some adults retain faint markings) and stripes from the father. Any mane that a male tigon may have will appear shorter and less noticeable than a lion’s mane and is closer in type to the ruff of a male tiger. It is a common misconception that tigons are smaller than lions or tigers. They do not exceed the size of their parent species because they inherit growth-inhibitory genes from the lioness mother, but they do not exhibit any kind of dwarfism or miniaturization; they often weigh around 180 kilograms (400 lb).
Still, due to their characteristic nervousness, Russian Blue’s generally did not perform particularly well at shows, leading to a decline in their popularity into the 1980s. When breeders focused their attention on improving the personality of the breed through selective breeding, and by training their kittens to stay calm in a show environment, the Russian Blue once again became an attention getter and award winner. Since the 1990s the Russian Blue has been winning regional and national awards consistently, and today it enjoys a well-deserved and steady popularity.
Allergies taking a toll on you? If you’re longing to have a cat, despite your allergies, there are few “hypoallergenic” breeds known to produce fewer allergens than other cats. Key among these is the Russian Blue Cat. Being one of the few hypoallergenic cat breeds out there, the Russian Blue is considered extremely special. This translates into the Russian Blue Breed being one of the rarest cat breeds. You can view our available Hypoallergenic Kittens for sale and contact us once you intend to adopt. Getting a hypoallergenic Russian Blue Kitten for sale is a great option for cat owners who have allergies.
Because they are easily startled, it’s best to keep equipment and devices that make loud noises, i.e., vacuum cleaners, blenders and such tucked away in a storage or a corner spot in the house. When this happens, scoop up your cat, place them in a quiet, safe spot and reassure him. Allocate a quiet space for your cat as sort of “sanctuary” so they can retreat as needed.
Black grizzled tabbies are unique to the Chausie breed among domestic cats. The grizzled pattern comes from the jungle cat; it is never found in domestic cats unless they have F. chaus ancestors.[8] The kittens are often born completely black, although occasionally they may have a bit of light colored fur on the chin or neck at birth. As the kittens get older, they begin to look more and more like tabbies. However, they are tabbies with black on black markings. That is, the background color is a sort of dark brownish black, and the markings, such as the mid-line stripe on the spine, are pure black. In addition, alternating bands of off-white appear on individual hairs in the background color. The bands are along the middle of each hair. The root of each hair is mousie gray, while the tip of each hair is black. The off-white banding or "ticking" usually appears first on the neck, chin, and belly, as well as the insides of the ears. Later, the grizzling will often extend up the sides from belly to almost the spine. In the most heavily grizzled cats, the grizzling extends over the back of the neck, on the face, and even on the legs and tail. Usually the grizzling is complete by age 3 years. The effect in the best cats is spectacular. Grizzling does have a wide range of expression, however, and some cats never have more than a few banded hairs in the ears or in one spot on the belly, occasionally not even that.
What's wrong with my poor gravy? My cat Gravy has become extremely affectionate today and has followed me outside 3x, where he never ever goes! He's following me like a shadow and meowing at me more than normal. He doesn't seem to be in any pain, but his breathing and change of demeanor have me concerned. He's breathing fairly rapidly thru his nose, and he is moving his tail a lot also acting maybe as if he is worried?
Chausies are bred to be medium to large in size, as compared to traditional domestic breeds.[5] Most Chausies are a little smaller than a male Maine Coon, for example, but larger than a Siamese. Adult Chausie males typically weigh 15 to 25 pounds.[6][7] Adult females are usually 15 to 20 pounds.[6] However, because Chausies are built for running and jumping, they are long-bodied and leggy with medium boning.[1] The torso is deep-chested with flat sides. The ears are broad, tall, and set high on the head, about two fingers apart. The cheekbones are striking—prominent, long, and angular—and the eyes are flattened on top and form a half oval below.
My cat has always been healthy for 18 years human age until just last week of April my daughter told me that she is blind banging walls, and when I look closely her breathing was soooo rapid and that’s why I took her to the vet the following day (Thursday) and the vet took an x-ray found out that Shellas lungs was covered with fluids, he did not take a blood test that day coz of her conditions, he gave me pills but so far shellas conditions is not getting any better... what should I do????
My cat (6 years old, castrated , female) for a week is showing signs of periodic but long lasting tachypnea. During the last week her breathing rate has reached 60/min ( normal 18-20/min) . Whenever she is tachypneic she is also very lethargic . Her popliteal lymph nodes are swollen and her white blood cel count ( 4,63 ) and neutrophil count (2.48) is slightly low. Abdominal ultrasound , cardiac and thoracic x rays did not show any abdonormalities ( mesenteric lymph nodes heart and lungs were normal ). Biochemical blood work results where normal . She is FeLV and FIV negative. She is also suffering from diarrhea and frequent urination ( 6 times daily)
Any changes in breathing should be concerning, you should keep a close eye on Lucy to see if it passes; if it seems like she is having difficulty getting enough oxygen or her gums are pale you should visit a Veterinarian immediately. Infections, laryngeal disorders, airway obstructions, tumours, poisoning, anaemia among other causes may cause respiratory difficulties. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
Actually what you are seeing are the different color phases of a Bobcat. During the winter months, they are brown or brown grey. That is why Boris looks grey in the center picture, that was taken during the winter. All 3 are now orange or a brown/orange mix. Nakoma has the most orange on him as does Amber. Boris, since he is still a kitten, just a little over a year old, he still has a combination of orange and brown. Next summer he will be more orange.
Originally hailing from Mesopotamia, now present-day Iran, these kitties won over a guy (OK, more accurately an Italian nobleman, perhaps the first documented “cat man”) who brought them to Europe in the 1600s, says Purina, adding that they later became a favorite of Queen Victoria. Perhaps their regal past is why they’re noted as independent and usually selective about the humans with whom they hang. They’re described as quiet types who thrive in relaxed environments.

Without examining Potchi, I cannot cannot confirm whether or not she has a fever; rapid breathing and shivering may be due to a variety of different conditions including infections, trauma, pain among others. You should keep an eye on her, but due to her young age I would recommend visiting your Veterinarian for an examination to be on the safe side. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

Pleural effusion is an abnormal buildup of fluid up in the pleural cavity, the thin fluid-filled space that lies between the lungs and the chest wall. It is a symptom, with an underlying disorder causing this fluid to build up. The buildup of excess fluid leads to difficulty breathing, due to the inability of the lungs to fully expand. Causes include congestive heart failure, liver failure, fluid overload, blood clotting disorders (usually due to ingestion of rat poison), lung lobe torsion, pulmonary edema, and diaphragmatic hernia. 

The Russian Blue is a robust breed, with firm muscles and an overall dose of good looks. It is physically in the same class as the Korat and Oriental Shorthair -- long, slender, elegant. It is of a medium size, and muscular, but compared to a swimmer in the compactness of its musculature. When it is in full motion and stretched out, one can see that it has a long, graceful neck, but the neck is hidden by thick fur and high set shoulder blades when the cat is sitting, making it look as though it has a short, thick neck.
Two days is still early days for treatment but you should start seeing some improvement in the next day or so, I would say to give it the weekend and if there is no improvement in Jinx’s condition you should return to your Veterinarian on Monday for another examination. Improvement in an animal's condition, especially with antibiotics, can be delayed in most cases so unless your Veterinarian said specifically ‘you’ll see improvement over the next 24 hours’ or something similar you should give it three or four days at least. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
My cat has started so breath really shallow more rapid breaths rather than his normal breathing rate and depth. The only thing I can think of that has occurred in the last couple of hours is that my fiancé fed him along with our other two male cats some beef tendon which she has done before. The other two cats are just fine. Kingston however seems to be having a hard time taking a full breath and breathing at a normal rate. I checked his mouth and did not see anything. He isn’t active like normal and will only sit in one spot and not move. I picked him up and held him in front of his back legs and behind his front legs and he let out a slight meow as to not like that. I am not sure what to do for him. We have some allergy medicine but I do not know if that would help in any way. I couldn’t even get him to take a treat which he never turns down. Please help.
My cat (6 years old, castrated , female) for a week is showing signs of periodic but long lasting tachypnea. During the last week her breathing rate has reached 60/min ( normal 18-20/min) . Whenever she is tachypneic she is also very lethargic . Her popliteal lymph nodes are swollen and her white blood cel count ( 4,63 ) and neutrophil count (2.48) is slightly low. Abdominal ultrasound , cardiac and thoracic x rays did not show any abdonormalities ( mesenteric lymph nodes heart and lungs were normal ). Biochemical blood work results where normal . She is FeLV and FIV negative. She is also suffering from diarrhea and frequent urination ( 6 times daily)

Russian Blues are very intelligent. My female knows commands and obeys. If I say no she responds with a quiet meow but obeys. My male is the most affectionate cat I have ever had while my female decides when she is to be loved. She sits on my shoulder while I put on makeup and knows how to signal me to bend over so she can jump onto high places like the top of an armoire or top shelf of the closet. Love this breed and are very loyal and clean cats.
Big cats can be made to sit by either right-clicking on the ground or on the big cat with a whip. When stationary, they will not move. You can toggle between them sitting and moving around by right-clicking the ground or the cat with a whip again. A player cannot mount a saddled big cat whilst holding a whip (or any other item that requires the use of right-click).
Hello, my 20 year old brother stepped on our [probably] 7-8 week kitten, she's breathing rapidly now, I don't know what to feed her but it's been at least a while since she was squished, she's acting normal but still is breathing oddly, I don't know what to feed her as well cause I'm scared it might damage her teeth or something, and I can't afford a vet.
Though I here you. There are those who have a special relationship with exotic animals, and they don't breed. I have feral cats, I trap, neuter and release. It takes a lot of patience as well as knowledge to have and care for an exotic animal, but it can be done. This is my friend and Nicky https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=472498366114433&set=a.453487321348871.109921.453002251397378&type=1&relevant_count=1.
Aside from the remarkable coat, these cats have large, enticing eyes that are wide-set and are coloured emerald green. Russian Blues are often labeled as “Doberman Pinschers of Cats” because of their fine coat and the elegantly outlined yet powerful feline physique. The body has a double coating of thick fur that’s rich and plush. Breeders and experts often compare the silky coat to a beaver’s or a seal’s.
11 month old kitten with rapid breathing since we got him at 3 months old. Acting normal, voiding without issue, playing, eating and drinking. Normal behaviors. As a nurse myself I always questioned his fast breathing but because he is a kitten I let it slide thinking that maybe they, like babies/children have faster respiratory rates. He is half tabby half Maine coon and is about 12-13lbs. His respiratory rate at rest is about 75-85. He has only panted about 3 times that we’ve seen during intense play time with our other cat. No coughing or runny nose. I’m very worried now that he is approaching a year old. I’ve been through the ringer with expensive tests at the vet with another cat and I’m wondering what are the baseline tests for this that I can start with that could lead to answers? And what are the most common diagnosises with rapid breathing being the only symptom? Thoughts and many thanks in advance!

I'm afraid that I can't offer much more assistance for Bella than what you have already done, without being able to see or examine her. If she has not had a trans-tracheal wash, that may be one test that can help determine the type of cells that are present in her lungs, and if the x-rays have not been evaluated by a specialist, that is another possibility, as your veterinarian should be able to send those x-rays to be evaluated further.
Long term prognosis for recovery of your cat will vary from cause to cause. Infections and pneumonia are serious illnesses that need a high degree of specialized veterinary care. In all cases, your cat’s chances for a full recovery will increase if immediate veterinarian care is sought as soon as initial symptoms are detected. Additionally, given the seriousness of lung and breathing issues, you should follow up after symptoms in your cat have resolved in order to prevent potential recurrence.
Causes for an increase in respiratory rate may include pain, infections, heart disease, respiratory tract obstruction, increased temperature among others; a cat’s resting respiratory rate shouldn’t be higher than around 40 breaths per minute, if it is higher than this then I would advise you visit your Veterinarian for an examination to determine the underlying cause. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
I was given an Enisyl-F Pump and have been administering that every 12 hours as instructed. The cause for my question, is two days later she has began breathing in the same manner that caused me to call the Vetenarian in the first place. It began for a good ten to twenty minutes and now she’s since stopped. I’m wondering is this normal or is it serious and if so should I take her back to the emergency Vet?
Blood work will identify the presence of any infections and will involve a quick needle stick procedure, done in your veterinarian’s office. Depending on the results from a preliminary physical exam, review of symptoms, and blood work, your veterinarian may wish to order imaging of your cat’s chest area. Images such as x-rays or an ultrasound will help identify any fluid buildup, foreign objects, or potential tumors, masses or foreign objects that may be causing the heavy breathing. Depending on your cat, your vet may order a mild sedative be given to your cat to potential limit movement. Your cat remaining calm and still will have a large impact on the clarity of the images.
About a month ago my 8 month old cat started panting after playing. I have also noticed for some time that her breathing is quite rapid even when sleeping. I called the vet and he suggested I take her for a check up. Everything seemed fine when the vet visited her but to be sure he told me to take her for a chest x-ray and blood test. I got the results yesterday and still no cause has been found to explain her breathing. All the tests were normal. The vet says he cannot rule out a heart problem and he suggests taking her to a cardiologist for a heart ultrasound. Apart from the panting (which is not every time she exercises but just occasionally) and rapid breathing (which I see every day) she seems a very health and active cat. I am not sure how concerned I should be about this. Perhaps it is just due to the heat. But I would not want to overlook a more serious underlying cause. I would not want to put her through any more distress by taking her a long way to a cardiologist. I would be grateful for any advice.
Cats can also develop fluid build up in the chest that is localized outside the lungs. This happens in an area named the pleural space. When fluid accumulates in the pleural space, the lungs cannot inflate as much as they should. Your cat will develop shortness of breath and labored breathing as more fluid fills this space. According to VCA Animal Hospitals, some causes of pleural effusion include:
It’s a great thing you went to the vet immediately. And even better news if the doc said everything seemed normal! We are no veterinarians – Paul and I – so please take your vet’s advice first. I would just add that it’s a good sign there’s not really other symptoms to the fast breathing other than loss of appetite (which might come back, or might already have since this morning??) It could be a small respiratory infection or a general feeling of unwellness, but your cat is older so it’s a good thing you checked with a vet first. Now it’s roughly 7:30 pm for you, I’d say if your cat is not having any other physical signs of distress or panting, blue gums, or anything bizarre, it will be safe to wait until the morning to see if the breathing has calmed. But please go with your gut and your knowledge of your cat!! If your cat’s behavior is still abnormal and he is refusing food then give another shot at the vet’s office. Possible bloodwork could be done and tests to see if there’s heartworm or other diseases that could be a cause for the prolonged, rapid breathing.

Give your Foreign Blue an adequate diet in the form of premium, dry cat food. You can spoil your cat from time to time and give him canned food that’s rich in protein. As they get older, dietary requirements may change, so it’s best to consult with a veterinarian for recommendations. When it’s time to change food, remember to add the new food gradually and mix it in the old one in the span of a few weeks or so. Make the transition too fast and your cat may get an upset tummy.
Regardless, you should visit your Veterinarian or an Emergency Veterinarian to examine Gizmo since she should be eating and drinking normally after this routine surgery and the ‘seizure like’ activity is also concerning; the moderate increase in respiration may be due to discomfort from surgery or due to something more serious. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
×