Conservation is a very complex issue and captive settings cannot duplicate it, so the important work of saving entire eco systems is not taught and not done in a captive setting. What’s worse is that lip service is paid to these worthy objectives and when you pay to see captive wildlife you walk away thinking you did something good when in fact you contributed to the problem. You paid to see a cat in a cage. You made sure that industry continues to breed and exploit more cats. You did not pay to save the wild and all of the wonderous and magnifient creatures who call it home. You put another nail in the coffin for the planet.
There are various reasons for an increased respiration rate and without examining Muffin it is difficult to narrow in on a specific cause; infections, pain stimulus, heart conditions, anaemia, poisoning among many other conditions may lead to an increased respiratory rate. If Muffin has a resting respiratory rate of 50 breaths per minute (shouldn’t be above 30 or 35) you should visit your Veterinarian for an examination to determine the underlying cause. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

I was under the impression that a Bobcat (meaning the wild kind) would be thinking dinner if he ran across a domestic cat. Bobcats are also so much bigger than a normal housecat. I can't imagine them breeding. Do they really breed in the "wild?" I got to see a bobcat closeup at a cat rescue (the owner used to do wildlife rescue and this guy couldn't go back to the wild) and I just can't imagine him wanting to breed with a domestic cat, as opposed to eating it.
Queening is a painful process just like childbirth is for humans and some heavy breathing or panting may occur afterwards for a few days due to discomfort. But if you feel that she is straining or in distress you should visit your Veterinarian to check her over to ensure that there isn’t a retained kitten or another issue leading to these symptoms. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

If the resting respiratory rate is above 40 breaths per minute, you should ideally visit a Veterinarian for an examination as it can be difficult to narrow in on a specific cause; there are a few possible causes for this rapid breathing including infections, laryngeal disorders, pain among other causes. You should visit a Veterinarian as soon as possible for an examination to narrow in on a cause. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
There are good and bad with everything. The genetic code is being increased with more offspring from more individual tigers, you will have a stronger genetic code. The question is animal quality of life. But ask yourself this. If a tiger is brought into the world to an abusive trainer, would that tiger rather be unborn? Hopefully we can rescue them when they are abused, but a living being is precious and always wanted in this world.
A normal healthy cat will take 20-30 regular breaths per minute. The air travels into your cat’s lungs and is used to oxygenate the blood, which is then circulated throughout your cat’s vital organs. When a cat is suffering from rapid breathing, this breath rate increases and often becomes irregular, or shallow. This can often be an indication that your cat is not able to bring enough oxygen into the lungs to supply their body’s need. Rapid breathing is a symptom that can be caused by a number of illnesses or injuries. Since regular breathing is vital, if your cat is suffering from rapid breathing (also known as tachypnea) it is a serious and life threatening condition and you should seek immediate veterinary care.
A cat may have rapid breathing for a variety of different reasons which may include infections, pain, high temperature (to cool down), heart failure among other causes; if your Veterinarian was unable to identify a cause, you should keep a close eye on Skittle and see if there is anything which occurs before an episode as it may be a reaction to anxiety from something. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
Originally hailing from Mesopotamia, now present-day Iran, these kitties won over a guy (OK, more accurately an Italian nobleman, perhaps the first documented “cat man”) who brought them to Europe in the 1600s, says Purina, adding that they later became a favorite of Queen Victoria. Perhaps their regal past is why they’re noted as independent and usually selective about the humans with whom they hang. They’re described as quiet types who thrive in relaxed environments.
Diagnosis of rapid breathing in your cat will require your veterinarian to determine the underlying cause. This will involve diagnostic tests that may not seem related to breathing, such as blood work, urinalysis and other extensive systemic exams. Given the lengthy list of potential conditions, it will be important for you to provide your veterinarian with a thorough physical and medical history of your cat. If your cat is allowed outdoors, has recently suffered from a traumatic injury, or could potentially have fallen from a high surface, this will be important information to help identify potential trauma or pain. You should also provide your vet with a history of progression of symptoms such as approximate time of onset and any worsening or improvement. This will help your veterinarian narrow down potential causes.
If Squeakers is acting normally otherwise and doesn't seem to be having any respiratory distress, this may just be normal for her. If she hasn't had a checkup in a while, it would be a good idea to have her checked out, regardless, as a veterinarian can listen to her heart and lungs, and assess her general health and whether this breathing pattern is normal, or a potential problem. I hope that all goes well for her!
Breathing rates may change for a variety of reasons and in some sleeping positions the airway may be slightly occluded which may result in altered breathing but without examining Kiki I cannot say for certain whether it is something to be concerned about or not. As for drinking, some cats may drink less that are on a wet food diet but you should ensure that she is keeping hydrated; you should visit your Veterinarian for a general check about the breathing and they can also check the hydration too. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
My cat just gave birth to 4 beautiful kittens but after her labor she started breathing rapidly. It has been 8 hours since, and she is still breathing rapidly and now she is also opening her mouth while sticking her tongue out. she already ate twice and drank lots of water but since her labor she hasn't done the restroom, I believe she is straining and now im very worried for her. what can be happening with her? what can I do?

You’ll be immediately drawn to the Russian Blue’s shining green eyes and the silver-like, smooth coat. While majority of the coat is colored bright blue, the foot may sometimes have a lavender base that darkens as it travels upwards to the guard hair tips, which is the cat’s protective topcoat. The ends of each strand of fur sparkles with silver, often resembling the tips of spears when the light catches it.

This is a well-behaved cat that is easy to train. Or, rather, it easily trains its people. It enjoys a good game of fetch and will keep the game going longer than you may have time for, and you will make time because the Russian Blue is known for actually appearing hurt when it has been ignored. Elegant, and reserved, this cat is also very playful, and loves to chase after toys or sunbeams.
In 1912 the Foreign Blue, one of the breed’s early names, warranted their own class and finally got separated from the blue cats variety. Progress of the cat’s popularity was halted, with the breed coming dangerously close to extinction during the onset of World War II. Breeders tried to revive the line by crossing the Russian Blue to Bluepoint Siamese and British Blues. Scandinavian breeders tried the same using Finland blue cats and Siamese blues.
My cat is recovering from having a tumor taken off of his neck. He is not thriving and today i found that he has blood in his urine. He is also breathing in short bursts. The doc said unless he seems very uncomfortable, it can wait till tomorrow, MOnday. I want the cat to see his usual vet, instead of taking him to emergency. What would you do? I don’t want him to suffer, so i gave him some pain meds.
Unlike horses, the breeding pair does not need to be kept away from other big cats, but they do need to be kept close in order to breed, therefore it is recommended to place them in a fenced area. Winged big cats, ghosts and hybrids are sterile and cannot be bred, and snow leopards, white lions and white lionesses cannot breed with other big cat species.

Panthers are small big cats with orange or yellowish eyes, and are covered in a black coat. They are not actually a different species, but are in fact black variants of leopards (much like real life panthers). An essence of darkness can be used on a panther to create a winged panther. Winged panthers share the same wing textures as black manticores and bat horses.
Anticoagulants (blood thinners) and antiaggregants (antiplatelet) – These drugs reduce the occurrence of blood clots forming. Anticoagulants work by delaying the clotting of blood; common medications include Warfarin and Heparin. Antiaggregants stop platelets from clumping together to form a plug. Aspirin and clopidogrel are two drugs in this category.
Treatment for congestive heart failure is aimed at managing the medical cause of the condition as well as relieving symptoms associated with fluid build up in the lungs, pleural space, and abdomen. In a few situations, once the cause has been treated (such as hyperthyroidism), the heart may recover, however, most cases of CHF are irreversible, but it may be managed to slow down the progress. Stabilising your cat if he has fluid build up in the lungs or pleural cavity, relieving symptoms and this may include:

Feeding tamed big cats raw fish, raw porkchops, raw beef or raw rabbit together in an enclosed space will activate love mode. They can either be fed the meat, or it can be dropped next to them. After being fed and paired together, love hearts will show around the breeding pair, and after around 5–10 minutes, a cub will be produced and the naming screen will appear.
Origin: The exact country of origin is unknown but the Russian Blue first appeared in cat shows in London. Though, it is widely believed that the breed is most likely from Russia because their thick double coat suggests they had been well adapted to living in very cold climates. The common story is that British sailors fell in love with this breed of cat on their travels and brought them home from the White Sea port town of Archangel. In 1871, the blue coated cat first made its appearance in a cat show at the Crystal Palace in London. 

There are a few possible causes of rapid breathing or increased respiration rate in cats which may be due to allergies, infection, foreign objects, sign of pain, other pulmonary problems among other issues. It is important that any serious causes or ruled out or treated, it would be best to have your Veterinarian give Darcy a check up to be on the safe side on your next visit as 80 breaths per minute is around double the physiological range. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM www.vet.cornell.edu/fhc/Health_Information/dyspnea.cfm
When my kitten is sleeping he breathes very quickly. He doesn’t do it once in while, he does it every single time and throughout the whole time he’s sleeping. I read online that to calculate their breathing, I should count how many times they breathe within a 15 second period and multiply it by 4. It also said they’re normal breathing rate should be around 25-30 and my kitten’s is 92. He’s seems pretty healthy, he eats he’s food, he’s drinking his water, he’s very active so I’m very confused about this.
Sorry to hear your kitty is scratching like that! Does he show any signs of skin infections, fleas, mites, wounds from other cats? The cone could have stressed him further, yes, if he was scratching already because of tension/anxiety. Open sores can get infected, especially when left untreated and scratched further. We would recommend taking your kitty to the vet for a diagnosis. They will be able to provide you the advice and medication your kitty might need. Best wishes!
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