It is possible that Milu is breathing rapidly due to pain, falling from that height may have left Milu with some permanent injury which occasionally causes some pain; however without examining him I cannot say with any certainty. You should continue to monitor him and look out for any other symptoms, but any head trauma may present with issue later on in life. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM


11 month old kitten with rapid breathing since we got him at 3 months old. Acting normal, voiding without issue, playing, eating and drinking. Normal behaviors. As a nurse myself I always questioned his fast breathing but because he is a kitten I let it slide thinking that maybe they, like babies/children have faster respiratory rates. He is half tabby half Maine coon and is about 12-13lbs. His respiratory rate at rest is about 75-85. He has only panted about 3 times that we’ve seen during intense play time with our other cat. No coughing or runny nose. I’m very worried now that he is approaching a year old. I’ve been through the ringer with expensive tests at the vet with another cat and I’m wondering what are the baseline tests for this that I can start with that could lead to answers? And what are the most common diagnosises with rapid breathing being the only symptom? Thoughts and many thanks in advance!

Some cats may breathe faster than others due to temperature, weight, allergies, pain among other factors; without examining Chip and doing x-rays etc… we cannot rule everything out. If you still have concerns, speak with your Veterinarian about having an x-ray done for peace of mind but if your Veterinarian has auscultated the chest and there are no concerning sounds you should just keep a close eye. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
If Squeakers is acting normally otherwise and doesn't seem to be having any respiratory distress, this may just be normal for her. If she hasn't had a checkup in a while, it would be a good idea to have her checked out, regardless, as a veterinarian can listen to her heart and lungs, and assess her general health and whether this breathing pattern is normal, or a potential problem. I hope that all goes well for her!
Hello, so after I had a party at my house a few days ago, my cat has been very weak, sleeping all the time, won't eat or drink as much as he used to, and breathing rapidly. I tried bringing him to a vet a couple of days ago and they said it was only stress due to the loud music and crowds from the party, and they told me to give him liquid food along with vitamins every hour for a few days. I've done that for a couple of days but it seems like my cat's breathing actually had gotten more shallow and heavy. I'm afraid that the vet misdiagnosed my cat (I don't trust the credibility of that vet, since they're not the one I'm used to go to), do you think there's anything more than just stress? Also if it helps, he's just gotten his first vaccination around last week. Thank you
The PIxiebob breed began as a result of natural mating. Carol Ann Brewer observed bob-tailed cats in the Cascade Mountains of Washington state. She adopted one of these cats in 1985, who then mated with a neighbor's cat. She obtained more of the "legend cats," bob-tailed local cats that somewhat resembled bobcats, and are thought to be results of natural matings between bobcats and domestic cats, although no proof exists. Pixiebobs are tall cats with back legs slightly longer than the front legs. They have thick double coats that may be short or long. Breed standards allow for up to seven toes in a PIxiebob, the only championship breed allowing for polydactly. Pixiebobs gained championship status with the TICA in 1998. Although Pixiebobs are often stone-faced like a wild cat, they are loyal and make good pets.
While oxygen is being transferred to the red blood cells, carbon dioxide is transferred from the red blood cells into the lungs. It is then carried out through the nose through a process referred to as expiration. This cyclic motion of breathing is controlled by the respiratory center in the brain and nerves in the chest. Diseases that affect the respiratory system, or the respiratory center in the brain, can bring about breathing difficulties. Troubled or labored breathing is medically referred to as dyspnea, and excessively rapid breathing is medically referred to as tachypnea (also, polypnea).
The reserved nature of the Foreign Blue means that strangers will have to acquaint themselves first before the cat can play with them. Guests will be more than likely regarded coolly and at a safe distance, with the cat not presenting himself until after a while. You may see these cats up high and perched on their safe spot, casually watching as the scene unfolds before deciding to jump in.
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If your cat is breathing heavily while resting, it can be a sign of several common problems from anxiety to airway disease. Understanding some of the reasons for labored breathing in cats can help you assess the severity of the situation. However, if your cat is having difficulty breathing, this is an emergency, and you should take your cat to your veterinarian right away.
Four of the five species of the big cats (the Panthera genus – lion, tiger, leopard, jaguar and snow leopard), the exception being the snow leopard can hybridize with each other to produce numerous hybrids. In fact, breeding of two different pantheras to produce hybrid big cats has been banned in many zoos and animal sanctuaries due to no conservation value of the hybrid, and the risk it poses on the mother that gives birth to it.

A few people experimented with breeding F. chaus to F. s. catus in the late 1960s and 1970s. Their intention was to provide a sensible alternative to keeping non-domestic cats as pets. However, the Chausie breed did not truly begin until the 1990s, when a dedicated group of breeders named the breed "Chausie" (after Felis chaus) and developed a planned breeding program and goals.[4] These breeders asked for and received registration status from TICA in 1995. The breed worked its way through the New Breed Class from May 2001 through April 2013, and became TICA's newest Championship breed on May 1, 2013.[1] Chausies are now being bred in both North America and Europe. The breed has begun the new breed recognition process in the World Cat Federation (WCF).
Kokwa may be breathing fast due to stress, pain, respiratory infection, heart conditions, anaemia (check gums), poisoning among other causes; without examining Kokwa and listening to the heart and lungs I cannot say specifically what may be wrong. You should keep a close eye on Kokwa and if the breathing doesn’t improve you should visit your Veterinarian in the morning or if you see he is in respiratory distress or his gums are white visit an Emergency Veterinarian immediately. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
Little is known about the origin of the Russian Blue breed, though stories are legendary. Many believe the Russian Blue is a natural breed originating from the Archangel Isles in northern Russia, where the long winters developed a cat with a dense, plush coat. Rumors also abound that the Russian Blue breed descended from the cats kept by the Russian Czars. Assuming the Russian Blue did migrate from northern Russia, it was likely via ship to England and northern Europe in the mid 1860s.
This breathing may be normal for Gracie, or may be a sign of distress and not being able to get oxygen the way that she needs to. Since I cannot assess her or her respiratory system, it would be best to have her examined by a veterinarian. They'll be able to look at her, listen to her heart and lungs, and assess her general health to see if she is having any breathing issues that need attention.
When the Russian Blue cat sees his favorite family member, though, it’s a whole different matter. This cat will follow the individual around the whole house and can sometimes hitch a ride on that person’s shoulder. The Foreign Blue greets the owner at the door and is sensitive to your mood, i.e., with playtime or just by settling down next to you. Owners rarely hear the cat’s voice unless it’s mealtime. Some of the things an Archangel Blue appreciates are a hearty game of fetch, a window with a great outdoor view and pats on the head.
The Chausie (/ˈtʃaʊsi/) is a domestic breed of cat that was developed by breeding a few individuals from the non-domestic species jungle cat (Felis chaus) to a far greater number of domestic cats (Felis silvestris catus). The Chausie was first recognized as a domestic breed by The International Cat Association (TICA) in 1995.[1] Within the domestic breeds, the Chausie is categorized as a non-domestic hybrid source breed.[2] Because Chausies are mostly descended from domestic cats, by about the fourth generation they are fully fertile and completely domestic in temperament.

This breathing may be normal for Gracie, or may be a sign of distress and not being able to get oxygen the way that she needs to. Since I cannot assess her or her respiratory system, it would be best to have her examined by a veterinarian. They'll be able to look at her, listen to her heart and lungs, and assess her general health to see if she is having any breathing issues that need attention.
Finally, when breeders began to combine several of these bloodlines, the Russian Blue strengthened in its class. From 1965-1970, the number of registered Russian Blue’s increased exponentially. The "father" of the modern standard Russian Blue was GC Felinest Flying High of Velva. Flying High performed admirably at shows as a kitten, and through his bloodline 21 kittens were produced, with six of them going on to become Grand Champions, two given Distinguished Merit, and one a National Winner -- GC, NW Velva's Blue Viking, which won 7th Best Cat in 1971, and 2nd Best Cat in 1972.

If your cat is struggling to breath and is not eating or moving, it could be a sign of trauma in cats. A steep fall, collision or dog attack can result in internal injuries, which can affect your cats lung capacity. An internal hemorrhage, intense pain, fractures or pneumothorax constitute as emergencies that can cause fast, superficial abdominal breathing in cats.
Our senior cat began breathing heavily with fast respirations two days ago. Her appetite has gone down as well. I can get her to drink broth, and eat small amounts of tuna. About two months ago she began vomiting here and there after eating, but her appetite and energy were still good so I just assumed she might have eaten too quickly. She is still drinking, and hasn't vomited since the heavy,fast breathing and loss of appetite started three days ago, but she hasn't eaten much to throw up I guess. My concern is if this is just end of life I don't want to stress her out bringing her to the vet and getting unnecessary tests done. I feel like our vet's office has begun running tests more for the price tag they carry than whatever diagnosis they are hoping to find. I regret putting my senior dog through all the trips to the vet and tests they did before finally having him put down. If this is end of life I'd rather her go where she is comfortable at home than in the unfamiliar vet's office.

Age can have an effect on any animal and may cause a minor issue for a younger animal to be more severe in an older one; rapid breathing may be caused by a few different causes which may include pain, obstruction, heart failure among other issues. Given Zoey’s age, you should certainly visit your Veterinarian for an examination and a blood test to check her numbers. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
The Russian Blue appears bigger than it actually is because of its double coat, which is the most eye-catching feature of this breed. Dense, silky, and plush, the hair stands out at a 45-degree angle, allowing you to literally trace patterns into it, where they will remain until you smooth your hand over them. According to some legends, the Russian Blue was at one time the target of hunters, who likened their luxuriant fur to the fur of seals. The coat is bright blue, preferably lavender at the base (root), darkening along the shaft up to the tips of the guard hairs (protective hairs in the topcoat), which are tipped in silver. The coat shimmers with reflective light.
Without examining Squish I cannot say whether there is a cause for concern or not, but generally if she is otherwise healthy and active when awake and isn’t showing any signs of exercise intolerance I would keep an eye on her. It may be that her sleeping position or a partial obstruction of the airway whilst resting may be causing an increase in respiratory effort; you should record her sleeping and visit your Veterinarian for an examination to be on the safe side for a little examination. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
Thank you for your email. I'm glad that you have a scheduled appointment with Paige, as if the medications did not work, it deserves a second look. One thing that your veterinarian can do is to take an x-ray of her lungs and make sure that there is nothing to worry about there. If she isn't on heartworm prevention, a heartworm test might be a good idea as well. Without knowing the details of her situation, or being able to examine her, I can't comment more on what might be happening with her. I hope that she recovers well!

Oh, she’s blue all right — with a silver cast that electrifies this feline! A diluted version of the gene responsible for black hair is what produces the silvery coat seen on the Russian Blue. But that’s not the only thing that keeps her in a class of her own: Her bright green eyes, silky-to-the-touch double-layered coat and lithe body make her one of a kind.
Four of the five species of the big cats (the Panthera genus – lion, tiger, leopard, jaguar and snow leopard), the exception being the snow leopard can hybridize with each other to produce numerous hybrids. In fact, breeding of two different pantheras to produce hybrid big cats has been banned in many zoos and animal sanctuaries due to no conservation value of the hybrid, and the risk it poses on the mother that gives birth to it.
Feeding tamed big cats raw fish, raw porkchops, raw beef or raw rabbit together in an enclosed space will activate love mode. They can either be fed it or it can be dropped next to them. After being fed and paired together, love hearts will show around the breeding pair, and after around 5–10 minutes, a cub (either the same type as one of the parents or a hybrid) will be produced and the naming screen will appear.

We receive requests every week from people who are looking for some place to take their “pet” cat.  Each year we have to turn away more than 100 such “pets“.  These unwitting owners have discovered that all exotic cats, both male and female, neutered or not, spray and bite when they reach sexual maturity.  (They don’t just spray a little either.  We are talking about buckets of the foulest smelling urine, all over your house, your things and you. If you don’t believe me, watch this clip of a neutered lion HERE)  Moving them out to the yard means your neighbors will soon be complaining that your place smells like a zoo.   By the time they find us they have discovered that the zoos do not want their animals, that no one is willing to buy them and that they can’t even give them away.  Refuges are usually full to capacity and cannot take in another hungry mouth to feed.  All too often, these “pets” are turned out to fend for themselves, where they surely die of starvation or are euthanized.
This is simply not true. The bad comments I have seen have only been from owner who should have not owned a cat to begin with. People who don’t have problems don’t go posting on the internet about how they don’t have issues. Just like a golden retriever or any other more athletic intelligent breed some people simple don’t match with the breed. People who buy an athletic type animal yet wont met its requirement for attention and mental stimulation.
If your cat is breathing heavily while resting, it can be a sign of several common problems from anxiety to airway disease. Understanding some of the reasons for labored breathing in cats can help you assess the severity of the situation. However, if your cat is having difficulty breathing, this is an emergency, and you should take your cat to your veterinarian right away.
This cat’s name, derived from the Latin word for Jungle Cat, actually clues you in to the energy level of these felines. They’re described as affectionate and playful, but according to Canidae.com, this active, assertive and athletic breed — a hybrid of a Jungle Cat and a domestic cat — is not for everyone. They tend to develop strong bonds with their humans and need lots of mental and physical stimulation that not all owners can provide (The Wildcat Sanctuary of Sandstone, Minnesota, which doesn’t recommend hybrids as pets, is caring for two Chausies that didn’t fare well in a home environment.)
Thank you for your email. Since Tortie was just seen by your veterinarian and was deemed healthy, her periodic bouts of rapid breathing may be normal, and may follow bouts of exertion or anxiety. If the periods that she is breathing rapidly become more frequent, or more severe, it would be a good idea to have her seen by your veterinarian and examined to make sure that she is okay. It might be helpful to video the episode, since she doesn't seem to breathe that way when she is at an appointment. I hope that she is okay!
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