Thank you for your email. I do think that there might be more going on than stress, and kittens are prone to infectious diseases. If you don't trust that veterinarian that you saw, it would be a good idea to find a second opinion, even if you have to travel a bit to do so, as he could have a problem that needs to be treated. You can also call your veterinarian, let them know that he isn't getting better, and see if they have any other recommendations for him.
There are many different causes for the symptoms which you are describing which most likely are attributable to an infection; continue with the antibiotics and feed some plain canned pumpkin to help move the bowels a little, if Teddy isn’t drinking you should try syringing water to the mouth little by little as it is important he remains hydrated. See how he goes, but if there is no improvement you should return to your Veterinarian for another examination. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
Hypoglycemia is a life-threatening condition in which the blood sugar levels drop dangerously low. The pancreatic beta cells produce the hormone insulin which helps to move glucose from food into the cells (for energy).  It is not a disease in itself, but it is a symptom of an underlying disorder. Causes include excessive insulin administration in the diabetic cat, decreased glucose production (missed meal, vomiting, certain medications, glycogen storage disease), and excessive glucose consumption due to sepsis (bacterial infection of the blood).
A supposed wildcat hybrid Bobcat (white) x domestic cat, with a further mating with a Highland Lynx to produce the curled ears. However, this is a selectively bred, totally domestic cat (no wild cat blood) that is meant to look like a bobcat. The Alpine lynx has longer hind legs and a large but not round head. The toes are tufted. They are intelligent cats.
Hello, I took my 9 month old Maine Coon to the vet 2 days ago to get a couple of mats shaved. I tried and was unsuccessful. It was a very stressful event for him, it took 3 people :( He started coughing and breathing very heavy last night. He is eating well but the quick breathing and coughing is continuing. Could this be related to stress? I am scared to stress him out more by taking him in.
Temperament: The Russian Blue is a distinguished, reserved, sweet cat. They make wonderful, loving companions but they may be reluctant to be social with people other than their family. They will bond with you and become fiercely loyal. Often, Russian Blues want to be right where you are, at all times. They will follow you around, helping you with whatever tasks you need to do and will happily snuggle up when it is time to rest. They do enjoy games and particularly love to teach their human counterparts how to fetch. They are playful and get along well with children who are gentle and treat them with respect. They are great pets and wonderful companions for families and will quickly wiggle their way into everyone's hearts.
My cat seems to have rapid breathing, I can see her stomach area rising and falling as she sleeps. I tried to take her breathing rate and got 60-65 per minute. She is grooming herself more than usual. She has always been skittish, her eating is normal, and she has had normal bladder and bowel functions. I have a hard time getting her into a carrier so I do not take her to the vet often. I am in an area that is getting prepared for a powerful nor'easter, so I can't get her to a vet for a few days. Should I be worried? What can I do?
There are other reasons, in the real world, why it doesn’t work, which includes the fact that human – big cat conflict is one of the main reasons cats are wiped out of areas. Captive breeding not only selectively chooses animals that are least fit for the wild but also conditions the cats to not fear humans. That increases the conflict and the result is that not only would the offending cat be killed, but likely any wild cat seen in the area would be hunted down and killed in a case of mistaken identity. That escalates the extinction of cats in the wild.
Four of the five species of the big cats (the Panthera genus – lion, tiger, leopard, jaguar and snow leopard), the exception being the snow leopard can hybridize with each other to produce numerous hybrids. In fact, breeding of two different pantheras to produce hybrid big cats has been banned in many zoos and animal sanctuaries due to no conservation value of the hybrid, and the risk it poses on the mother that gives birth to it. 

Although the official, permissible outcrosses for the Chausie breed are the Abyssinian and the domestic shorthair (no recognizable breed), in practice any kind of purely domestic outcross can be used. TICA rules only dictate that cats must be a certain number of generations removed from the jungle cat ancestors and have three generations of registered Chausie ancestors to be eligible for competition at shows.[1] Consequently, a variety of breeds, albeit usually lively outgoing breeds (see below), were used to develop the Chausie breed and continue to be used occasionally as outcrosses. This has given the breed a diverse and healthy genetic foundation.
Adding to the captivating physical qualities of this breed is the eye color. The eyes are yellow while the Russian Blue is a kitten, and by four months there is a bright green ring around the pupil. As the cat matures, the eye color graduates into a bright, vivid green, aesthetically intensifying the already remarkable blue-silver coloring of the cat. The eyes are wide set and round, and only slightly slanted at the upper corners, giving the Russian Blue a sweet expression that matches well with its gentle temperament.
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