Sorry to hear your kitty is scratching like that! Does he show any signs of skin infections, fleas, mites, wounds from other cats? The cone could have stressed him further, yes, if he was scratching already because of tension/anxiety. Open sores can get infected, especially when left untreated and scratched further. We would recommend taking your kitty to the vet for a diagnosis. They will be able to provide you the advice and medication your kitty might need. Best wishes!
Hypoglycemia is a life-threatening condition in which the blood sugar levels drop dangerously low. The pancreatic beta cells produce the hormone insulin which helps to move glucose from food into the cells (for energy).  It is not a disease in itself, but it is a symptom of an underlying disorder. Causes include excessive insulin administration in the diabetic cat, decreased glucose production (missed meal, vomiting, certain medications, glycogen storage disease), and excessive glucose consumption due to sepsis (bacterial infection of the blood).
There are many different causes for rapid breathing in cats which may include pain, respiratory infection, heart failure among other causes. Without an examination and thorough auscultation of the chest, I cannot say what the cause is or the best course of treatment; anytime resting respiratory rate is over 40 breaths per minute, you should visit your Veterinarian as soon as possible. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
Resting respiratory rate in a cat is around 15-40 breaths per minute, if Alaska is breathing more than that then it may be indicative of some underlying medical issue; without examining Alaska it is difficult for me to say specifically the cause or any treatment. An increase in respiratory effort may be attributable to pain, fluid in the lungs, narrowed airways among other issues; if you have recently changed food you should try changing back again but I would recommend having your Veterinarian check Alaska over to be on the safe side. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
Without examining Squish I cannot say whether there is a cause for concern or not, but generally if she is otherwise healthy and active when awake and isn’t showing any signs of exercise intolerance I would keep an eye on her. It may be that her sleeping position or a partial obstruction of the airway whilst resting may be causing an increase in respiratory effort; you should record her sleeping and visit your Veterinarian for an examination to be on the safe side for a little examination. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
My kitten has been in and out of the vet's office and is on strong antibiotics and oxygen since Oct. 26 until now and he is getting better for a few days and he is right back at it. He has spent a lot of time at the vet and the bill is getting high. He is home and I am giving him the antibiotics and oxygen at home and it does not seem to be helping here. But at the vet he does good after a day or two. How much oxygen do I give him at home and how often?
If you’re her favorite human, be ready for nonstop love, because she is all about you, you and more you. Feeling out of sorts? She’ll stick by your side, working her healing abilities on you until you’re up and at ’em again! Prepping dinner? She’ll chill by your side, acting as taste tester. Binge-watching a new TV show? She’ll curl up by your side — just have a comb handy, as she loves being brushed while watching the tube!
Chest x-rays and standard blood tests may be indicative of valley fever but the condition is only confirmed with a specific test for valley fever; all other indicators may say valley fever but we still need the test to confirm. However if Nunzi has any response to the antifungal treatment then it adds another tick in the box for valley fever. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM https://vfce.arizona.edu/valley-fever-dogs/diagnosis https://vfce.arizona.edu/valley-fever-dogs/treatment

My 4 year old cat,yuri,had diaherria and vomited after she vomited she started to breathe rapidly and acted uneasey we thought maybe she has heatstroke so we cooled her off and after that we thought she was OK but we did not realize later that she was still breathing rapidly and acting lethargic the whole day ,she also hasn't eaten anything at since morning and has drank very little water ,I've been very worried and been thinking to take her to the vet tomorrow morning ,just hoping you guys would give us some advice for the night


My cat, Halia, is breathing heavily. However, she has mammary tumours which had reoccurred after prior removal of earlier tumours. On her second visit for the new tumours, it was found that the growth has spread to her lungs. The vets told me that any course of treatment at this stage will not be advisable or productive given that her tumours returned after only 2 months, and they are spreading very aggressively.
Russian Blues have a tolerant nature toward children who treat them kindly and respectfully. They will even put up with the clumsy pats given by toddlers, as if they recognize that no harm is meant, and if necessary they will walk away or climb out of reach to escape being bonked on the head. That said, the patient and gentle Russian Blue should always be protected from rough treatment, so always supervise very young children when they want to pet the cat.
Hi, My cat fell from our 3rd floor window 1 month ago. Hopefully i found him immediately and brought her to the vet. She had her mouth bleeding. The vet did an injection and xrayed her. She only had a palate wound, but the vet said that it was mostly on the hard palate and that she doesn’t need any stitches if she eats normally. Luckily when we got back home she immediately ate, drank water and went to the toilet. I want to think everything went back to normal but sometimes i find her breathing very fast, today she even panted when we were playing around and also i notice her sometimes blinking only one eye. When i asked our vet she says if the cat has a problem with her lungs she would breath rapidly all the time and not just sometimes. She said everything should be fine. But i am still worried, should i be?
The Russian Blue made his first appearance on the world stage of the cat fancy at an exhibit of cats held at London’s Crystal Palace in 1875. Labeled an Archangel Cat, because he was said to be from the Russian island of Archangel, he competed against other blue cats of varying types. A newspaper report of the show described the Russian Blue as “very handsome” and “particularly furry,” adding “They resemble mostly the common wild grey rabbit.” Other early names by which the breed was known were Maltese and Foreign Blue.
Thank you for your question, and I am sorry about Billi. Unfortunately, without seeing the x-ray, knowing where or how large the tumor is, I can't comment on possible solutions. Lung masses are difficult to treat and tend not to respond well to therapy, but it really does depend on the type of mass, and he is quite young to have lung cancer. Sometimes we are able to to a tracheal wash to try and identify the type of cells, but I'm not sure if that is an option for Billi. Any possible treatments would be a good conversation with your veterinarian, who has seen Billi, and his x-rays, and knows more about his situation. I hope that he does well.

My kitten Rupert is only 7 weeks old and he started breathing rapidly the night before. At times he groans and breathes with his mouth open. He feels and sounds most uncomfortable when he is being held, but still has discomfort if laying down for a long time. I'm not sure if he has a cold, or if its something wrong with his lungs? He had just been in the emergency just 2 days ago for low blood sugar, but he wasn't doing this at that time. What do I do?


They appeared under the name Archangel cat and competed against other shorthair cats. Though they are a shorthaired cat breed, it is not believed that they are related in any way to other shorthaired solid blue breeds (Korat, Chartreux, and British Blue) as their coats are very different. In 1912, the GCCF (Governing Council of Cat Fancy) recognized the breed as a breed of its own and gave it its own class called Foreign Blue. The breed grew in popularity but World War II almost completely wiped out the breed. After the war, breeders set forth to revive the breed and began to outcross with other breeds. Russian Blues were mated with British Blues and blue point Siamese.
He is not lethargic and doesn't have laboured breathing and doesn't pant when he does. He breathes well through his nose. When he washes himself, it's the normal kind. There are no abnormal bites or scratches when he does. My calculated guess is that it's normal for a kitten his age to be as active as he is? He gets the proper nutrition and he does drink kitten milk. Could that be a factor? I keep my eye on his breathing state when he sleeps on me.
There are other reasons, in the real world, why it doesn’t work, which includes the fact that human – big cat conflict is one of the main reasons cats are wiped out of areas. Captive breeding not only selectively chooses animals that are least fit for the wild but also conditions the cats to not fear humans. That increases the conflict and the result is that not only would the offending cat be killed, but likely any wild cat seen in the area would be hunted down and killed in a case of mistaken identity. That escalates the extinction of cats in the wild.
There are many possible causes for rapid breathing in cats which may include allergies or irritation; however it may also be due to more serious conditions including infections, heart failure, anaemia among other causes. Without examining Lexa I cannot say what the specific cause is, you should visit your Veterinarian if Lexa’s resting respiratory rate is above 40 breaths per minute to determine the cause and treat accordingly. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
Big cats spawn on grass blocks at light levels of 9 or more in groups of up to 4. Some cats only spawn in certain biomes: leopards spawn in jungles, forests and forest variants; lions, panthers and tigers spawn in plains and forests; and snow leopards spawn in cold biomes. Lions and tigers also spawn more frequently than panthers. There is a 1/20 chance for a white lion, white lioness or white tiger to spawn.
A kitten turned up in my family's yard. Because of her tanish-grey coloring and the black tufts on her ears, we at first wondered if she was a bobcat kitten. A quick look at bobcat traits (she has a long black tail, no ruff of fur around her face) proved that not to be true, and we figured she was just a slightly odd-looking stray domestic cat. We took her in.

This is about my cat. He was fine when he was a kitten other than being feral and not used to people. But about two months ago, he started doing this thing where he is breathing fine and all one minute and the next it sounds like his breath is coming out in quick bursts almost like coughing. And it always goes for about 8 or so bursts of breath. Is this something I should take him to the vet about ?


Unlike horses, the breeding pair does not need to be kept away from other big cats, but they do need to be kept close in order to breed, therefore it is recommended to place them in a fenced area. Winged big cats, ghosts and hybrids are sterile and thus cannot breed. White lions and lionesses and white tigers cannot breed with other big cat species.

Russian Blues like their daily routine to be just so, and dislike household changes more than the average cat— and the average cat dislikes household changes a lot. They particularly dislike changes to their dinner schedule, and will make you aware of their displeasure. They are also fastidious about their litter boxes and will complain or may even go elsewhere if they’re not spic and span.
The Russian Blue stands out for his coat color. To the uninformed, he might look gray, but in cat show terms he is an even, bright blue with silver-tipped hairs that make him seem to glisten. Some Russian Blue kittens are born with “ghost stripes,” a reminder of the tabby gene that all cats carry, even if it isn’t expressed in their coat, but these generally fade, leaving the cat with the solid blue coat of maturity.
The Maine Coon, one of the oldest in North America, was first discovered in Maine, where it is the official state feline. According to the International Cat Association (TICA), they are known and liked for their intelligence, friendliness and good-natured goofiness. (Fetch? Heck yeah!) They prefer to hang with their people versus being coddled by them.
He is not lethargic and doesn't have laboured breathing and doesn't pant when he does. He breathes well through his nose. When he washes himself, it's the normal kind. There are no abnormal bites or scratches when he does. My calculated guess is that it's normal for a kitten his age to be as active as he is? He gets the proper nutrition and he does drink kitten milk. Could that be a factor? I keep my eye on his breathing state when he sleeps on me.
Aside from having a healthy diet and a healthy bathroom break, he's just a very extremely playful kitten, because he doesn't have any other symptoms after he's playing (falling over and not wanting to move after, no panting, no staggering when he walks, etc.) I don't know if I should be worried because he doesn't cry or mew or chew on any place on his body to indicate he's in any pain. And since he is still young, he hasn't been vaccinated or fixed yet, but that will happen when he's a few months older. He still has his milk teeth, which are perfect. No abnormalities or imperfections.
Thank you for your email. I'm glad that you have a scheduled appointment with Paige, as if the medications did not work, it deserves a second look. One thing that your veterinarian can do is to take an x-ray of her lungs and make sure that there is nothing to worry about there. If she isn't on heartworm prevention, a heartworm test might be a good idea as well. Without knowing the details of her situation, or being able to examine her, I can't comment more on what might be happening with her. I hope that she recovers well!
The Russian Blue stands out for his coat color. To the uninformed, he might look gray, but in cat show terms he is an even, bright blue with silver-tipped hairs that make him seem to glisten. Some Russian Blue kittens are born with “ghost stripes,” a reminder of the tabby gene that all cats carry, even if it isn’t expressed in their coat, but these generally fade, leaving the cat with the solid blue coat of maturity.
My kitten has been in and out of the vet's office and is on strong antibiotics and oxygen since Oct. 26 until now and he is getting better for a few days and he is right back at it. He has spent a lot of time at the vet and the bill is getting high. He is home and I am giving him the antibiotics and oxygen at home and it does not seem to be helping here. But at the vet he does good after a day or two. How much oxygen do I give him at home and how often?

A cat shouldn’t be breathing more than around 40 breaths per minute when at rest, if her breathing is above this rate then it may be indicative of something going on. An increase in breathing may be due to infections, heart disease, cancer, pleural effusion, allergies among other causes; given Smudge’s age, I would have your Veterinarian take a look at her to be on the safe side. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
×