My cat was originally a stray and when I found her she was in perfect healthy. We regularly took her to her check ups. She is tiny but she appears to be an American shorthair. But, as of recently she started breathing weirdly. She would lay on her stomach and this rattle sound would emit from her body. Her breathes would change from shallow and rapid to deep and slow. Before this happened, she had a slight cough with the same rattle noise. Like a human with an infection in their lungs. When we took her to the vet they would tell us she was fine. She was active and still regularly eating. We've taken her to multiple veterinary clinics and they've all told us they aren't sure what she has. They've done multiple Xrays and still cant seem to narrow the problem. We've put her on several antibiotics prescribed by the vet but nothing seems to make a dent. They offered the idea of asthma. We gave her treatment but still nothing. They told us it seemed that she had air pockets and some fluid. We ended up paying a ridiculous amount for treatment of a washout and still nothing. She eats regularly but her breathing is still the same. There was this one time she sneezed and big amount of mucus discharge came from her nose. No matter who we go to they all tell us we need to prescribe more expensive treatment just so they can say they don't know in the end. Can you help us?
My cat was seen by my vet 2 days ago for lethargy, loss of appetite and rapid breathing. The vet diagnosed a viral or bacterial infection and slight dehydration. She had a temp of 103.4. She was given I.V. fluid, a long acting antibiotic shot and a fever reducer. She's not much better. Should I give the medication more time to work or does she need to be seen again.
The Bengal cat is a considerably older breed than the others in this list, but as a breed derived from a wild cat hybrid, it is worth a look. The Bengal breed, which developed from a cross between a domestic cat and an Asian leopard Cat, is also the starting point for other breeds in this list. There have been stories of naturally occurring crossbreeds in Asia from way back, with the oldest confirmed case in 1934. The breed as we know it began with geneticist Jean Sugden-Mills, who crossed ALCs with domestic cats in 1963. Twenty years of breeding resulted in the breed that was accepted as truly domestic by TICA. Bengal cats are large cats with distinctive markings. Generations F4 and beyond are considered to be good house pets.
Hi Claudia, thanks for your insights 🙂 Indeed, there’s no drug remedy for treating heartworm in cats, but it can be treated with thorough veterinary care. Cats are more resistant to heartworm than dogs, and signs often appear too late. Unfortunately heartworm is fatal even for cats who seem healthy on the outside:( Thanks for stopping by and reading FK.
Anticoagulants (blood thinners) and antiaggregants (antiplatelet) – These drugs reduce the occurrence of blood clots forming. Anticoagulants work by delaying the clotting of blood; common medications include Warfarin and Heparin. Antiaggregants stop platelets from clumping together to form a plug. Aspirin and clopidogrel are two drugs in this category.
You’ll be immediately drawn to the Russian Blue’s shining green eyes and the silver-like, smooth coat. While majority of the coat is colored bright blue, the foot may sometimes have a lavender base that darkens as it travels upwards to the guard hair tips, which is the cat’s protective topcoat. The ends of each strand of fur sparkles with silver, often resembling the tips of spears when the light catches it.
Our orange tabby kitten 11 weeks is having "episodes" of rapid breathing and horrible watery eyes. It starts nightly at about 5pm. It's a constant drip like a faucet is on and he is drenched. Starts from the right eye and then the left starts going. It drips down his face into his nose and then into the sides of his mouth where it pools until it drips out. During this he is lethargic and has severe rapid breathing. No fever, no diarrhea, no weight loss. lungs sound clear. eating and drinking water. Very playful like a kitten. It just this episode once a night in the evening.
Without examining Narla I cannot say for certain what the underlying cause for the breathing difficulties are, however it is possible that this is a side effect of the flea and tick medication especially if given an incorrect dose or given a product intended for use in dogs. You should visit your Veterinarian since Narla is having respiratory issues as soon as possible. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
As with so many cat breeds, little is known of the Russian Blue’s origins. He probably does come from Russia—his thick coat is surely that of a cat from colder climes—and he is considered a natural breed, meaning Matushka Nature created him, not the handiwork of humans. The Russian Blue’s development as a breed, however, took place primarily in Britain and Scandinavia, starting in the late nineteenth century, when showing and breeding cats became a popular activity.
Without examining Potchi, I cannot cannot confirm whether or not she has a fever; rapid breathing and shivering may be due to a variety of different conditions including infections, trauma, pain among others. You should keep an eye on her, but due to her young age I would recommend visiting your Veterinarian for an examination to be on the safe side. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
The next step would be to have a fine needle aspirate done on the popliteal lymph nodes to determine the types of cells present; lymph nodes can aggregate white blood cells in response to many conditions so an examination of the aspirate would be useful. With other parameters coming back normal, it is difficult to say what the specific cause is; but speak with your Veterinarian about performing a fine needle aspirate to help narrow in on a diagnosis. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
Because they are easily startled, it’s best to keep equipment and devices that make loud noises, i.e., vacuum cleaners, blenders and such tucked away in a storage or a corner spot in the house. When this happens, scoop up your cat, place them in a quiet, safe spot and reassure him. Allocate a quiet space for your cat as sort of “sanctuary” so they can retreat as needed.
He is not lethargic and doesn't have laboured breathing and doesn't pant when he does. He breathes well through his nose. When he washes himself, it's the normal kind. There are no abnormal bites or scratches when he does. My calculated guess is that it's normal for a kitten his age to be as active as he is? He gets the proper nutrition and he does drink kitten milk. Could that be a factor? I keep my eye on his breathing state when he sleeps on me.
My cat was seen by my vet 2 days ago for lethargy, loss of appetite and rapid breathing. The vet diagnosed a viral or bacterial infection and slight dehydration. She had a temp of 103.4. She was given I.V. fluid, a long acting antibiotic shot and a fever reducer. She's not much better. Should I give the medication more time to work or does she need to be seen again.
Don’t let the powerful, sleek features of the Foreign Blue fool you. This breed is generally shy, quiet and very gentle by nature. It’s more reserved than playful but that doesn’t mean the breed enjoys a good romp every now and then. The Russian Blue is intelligent and leans towards games that have a “throw and catch” mechanism. You’ll soon find yourself playing an endless game of fetch if you’re not careful! They are also attracted by sunbeams, laser pointers and love to go chase their favorite toys.
Hi. My cat has been lethargic for 4 days and spends lots of time under the bed. An inconclusive chest xray looked spotty and web-like in her lungs. My vet suggested valley fever tests but also said it could be cancer. She walks uneasy, but still attempts to eat and makes it to the litter box. She appears very restless and uncomfortable. I am giving her subQ fluids, an anti-fungal and pain meds to get her through the rough patch.
My cat, Halia, is breathing heavily. However, she has mammary tumours which had reoccurred after prior removal of earlier tumours. On her second visit for the new tumours, it was found that the growth has spread to her lungs. The vets told me that any course of treatment at this stage will not be advisable or productive given that her tumours returned after only 2 months, and they are spreading very aggressively.

Historians and cat lovers in Scandinavia and England worked tirelessly to map out a bloodline foundation for the cat breed. Records show that the first Archangel Blue appeared in 1875 to compete against similar blue breeds at the London Crystal Palace. One newspaper said that the Archangel was “particularly furry”, “very handsome” and “has similarities to that of the wild grey rabbit”. Before long, word was spreading around about the Russian Blue.


Hybrids have always been popular. They make people feel connected with the wilderness outside. We can’t all own lions and tigers (nor should we), but so many people want little felines that resemble their larger, exotic cousins. Some breeders have begun breeding smaller wild species with domestic cats to create beautiful hybrids that are safe for the average cat owner to live with. Although hybrids are still controversial, there is no denying how unique and beautiful they are. Take a look at the most popular hybrids below.
He is not lethargic and doesn't have laboured breathing and doesn't pant when he does. He breathes well through his nose. When he washes himself, it's the normal kind. There are no abnormal bites or scratches when he does. My calculated guess is that it's normal for a kitten his age to be as active as he is? He gets the proper nutrition and he does drink kitten milk. Could that be a factor? I keep my eye on his breathing state when he sleeps on me.
Standard tests include a complete blood count, biochemical profile, and urine analysis. These will help your veterinarian to determine if your cat has an infection or a low red blood cell count. They will also show whether your cat's internal organs are functioning normally. Your veterinarian will also draw a sample of blood to test the amount of oxygen and carbon dioxide in your cat's blood. This will help to determine how severe your cat's breathing difficulty is and whether the problem is in the lungs or somewhere else in the chest. Your veterinarian may also draw blood for a heartworm test. Other diagnostic tools that may be used are X-ray and ultrasound images of the chest, both to examine for an enlarged heart that can lead to heart failure, and to see if the lungs appear normal. The internal structure of the abdomen may also be examined using this method. If there appears to be an accumulation of fluid in the chest, lungs or belly, some of that fluid will be drawn off for analysis.
An increase in respiratory rate may be an indicator of pain especially if she is limping; without examining Isabella I cannot say whether this is due to pain or another cause (infection, heart disease etc…). I would restrict Isabella’s movements and monitor her for the time being but if it continues or the respiratory rate is above 40 breaths per minute you should visit your Veterinarian for an examination. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

The slight upturn to the corners of the mouth make Russian Blues appear to be forever smiling. Members of this breed are generally polite, quiet, and well-behaved, for cats. It’s quite easy to teach them to stay off counters and out of off-limit areas; usually a simple “No” will do. However, Russian Blues seem to think politeness should go both ways and take offense at being made to look silly. A dignified cat, Russian Blues can be trusted to know when you’re making fun of them—and they won’t soon forget this breach in manners, either.


It’s a good idea to keep a Russian Blue as an indoor-only cat to protect him from diseases spread by other cats, attacks by dogs or coyotes, and the other dangers that face cats who go outdoors, such as being hit by a car. Russian Blues who go outdoors also run the risk of being stolen by someone who would like to have such a beautiful cat without paying for it.
Tri-color Cats: Because of the associated genetic factors that create their color patterns, tri-color cats almost always are female, although occasional males crop up (about one in 3,000, according to this excellent article by Barbara French) Those rare males are almost always sterile, also for reasons of genetics, so don't expect to gain a fortune by selling your male calico cat.
Characteristics: You will first be struck by the beautiful silvery-blue coat of the Russian Blue. Their coat gives them an elegant appearance that is distinctly their own. The Russian Blue is a medium size cat that is muscular, with long legs and a long body. They are fine boned but often appear larger because of their thick double coat. They have large ears that are set far apart and are somewhat pointed. They have a medium, wedge-shaped head and, in addition to their uniquely beautiful coat, they have striking green eyes. They are wide-set and their vivid green color stands out because of the surrounding blue coat. They are truly a lovely and very beautiful cat.

Russian Blues are known to be quiet, gentle, genteel cats, and are usually reserved or absent when strangers come to call. When they’re with their own beloved and trusted humans, however, they are playful and affectionate. Russian Blues are active but not overly so. They like nothing better than to spend time pouncing on a favorite toy or chasing sunbeams. They willingly entertain themselves, but prefer games in which their preferred people take an active role. When you’re home, they follow you around, unobtrusive but ever-present companions.


Hello, I just got a kitten of 10 weeks, she has been wormed and vaccinated, however when she lays down on her side/back to sleep, she breathes really quickly and irregularly (sometimes really quickly then slowing to a normal rate then quickly speeding up again, her breathing never stops though). Is this anything of concern or is it fairly normal in a growing kitten? She also refuses to drink water, however she is currently on a wet food diet. Should she still be drinking water by itself?
Map out a regular routine for when you can do all of these things on a constant basis. Remember that the Russian Blue loves a good routine and will much more likely accept the treatment. Don’t forget to include playtime and petting to keep them happy. Your cat shouldn’t give you any problems during the grooming routine because they love to be combed, brushed and petted. In fact, the more time you spend with a Foreign Blue, the better!

Hello, so after I had a party at my house a few days ago, my cat has been very weak, sleeping all the time, won't eat or drink as much as he used to, and breathing rapidly. I tried bringing him to a vet a couple of days ago and they said it was only stress due to the loud music and crowds from the party, and they told me to give him liquid food along with vitamins every hour for a few days. I've done that for a couple of days but it seems like my cat's breathing actually had gotten more shallow and heavy. I'm afraid that the vet misdiagnosed my cat (I don't trust the credibility of that vet, since they're not the one I'm used to go to), do you think there's anything more than just stress? Also if it helps, he's just gotten his first vaccination around last week. Thank you
Our orange tabby kitten 11 weeks is having "episodes" of rapid breathing and horrible watery eyes. It starts nightly at about 5pm. It's a constant drip like a faucet is on and he is drenched. Starts from the right eye and then the left starts going. It drips down his face into his nose and then into the sides of his mouth where it pools until it drips out. During this he is lethargic and has severe rapid breathing. No fever, no diarrhea, no weight loss. lungs sound clear. eating and drinking water. Very playful like a kitten. It just this episode once a night in the evening.

This is simply not true. The bad comments I have seen have only been from owner who should have not owned a cat to begin with. People who don’t have problems don’t go posting on the internet about how they don’t have issues. Just like a golden retriever or any other more athletic intelligent breed some people simple don’t match with the breed. People who buy an athletic type animal yet wont met its requirement for attention and mental stimulation.
I hope that you can help me At school my granddaughter is currently (she is 8) working on wild cats. I have volunteered to make her a book of photographs and information on cats through the alphabet. There are two that I have not been able to find (hours on Google) V & X I was wondering if someone can help on a name (or Latin) for an obscure feline or subspecies. I think I will have to give up on the X but I’ve bent the rules a bit and will use Xausted and shown a lion sleeping in… Read more »
My cat was run over nearly a month ago. She had her tail amputated. She then come home and developed a lump in her belly. She went back to the vets and had surgery the lump was removed and sent to the lab for testing. It come back with relation to trauma of the car accident. Then last Friday i took her cone off to eat her dinner i went upstairs to have a shower and left her unattended when i come down her cut and drain marks were bleeding. I took her back to the vets who cleaned her up and sent us home! Sunday i noticed she was very quiet and not herself. I took her to the vets last night and she was shaking and her breathing was up at 48 breathes per minute! the vet gave her a 2 week antibiotic injection and has sent us home! today Wednesday i measured her breathing again and it is still at 48 a minute. I have called the vet and said that if she is still the same tomorrow then bring her back. How long does it take for the antibiotic to start working and will this then slow her breathing down? Thank you in advance
Resting respiratory rate in a cat is around 15-40 breaths per minute, if Alaska is breathing more than that then it may be indicative of some underlying medical issue; without examining Alaska it is difficult for me to say specifically the cause or any treatment. An increase in respiratory effort may be attributable to pain, fluid in the lungs, narrowed airways among other issues; if you have recently changed food you should try changing back again but I would recommend having your Veterinarian check Alaska over to be on the safe side. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
Lulu may be displaying perfectly normal behavior for an increase in temperature, or she may be having a problem. Without examining her, I have a hard time commenting on whether she is okay, but if she is acting normally otherwise, you may be fine to monitor her. If she continues to have rapid shallow breathing or seems to have problems catching her breath, it would be best to have her examined by a veterinarian.
Do your research. Bengals, Savannahs and many other hybrids even removed from the original crosses can be bad bad bad cats to have. Why risk a hybrid wild animal when you can get domestics that look just as amazing? Example: Ocicat; Egyptian Mau; if you are looking for wild looking cats. Classic Bombay cats look like black panthers; pixie bobs (some say are hybrids but its bunk) and highlanders are wild looking cats but not wild in the slightest. Many were made from regular domestic crosses with purebreds and/or landrace natural breeds etc. Look around, use wikipedia. Check out the cat fancy sites. There are domestics for everyone. Most are cheaper too. Wild animals/hybrids are like leaving a loaded pistol on your computer desk. You just never know for sure what can happen. Domestics can be unpredictable in the right circumstances, why add in a wild/hybrid factor and possibly endanger people and other pets around you? Would you want to carry that guilt the rest of your life?
^ Somerville, Louisa (2007). The Ultimate Guide to Cat Breeds. Edison, New Jersey: Chartwell Books. p. 44. ISBN 9780785822646. There is a lot of confusion surrounding the use of this name in the cat world, although it is always used to describe cats of distinctly Oriental type. It has been adopted simply because of the tradition which has grown up for using the names of countries and islands from south-eastern Asian for other Oriental breeds, such as the Siamese and Balinese.

Those animals were then bred indiscriminately, and many purposely inbred for traits such as white coats, tiny size, and docile (read retarded) temperament. None of the exotic cats in wild hands can be traced back to the wild, other than local cats, cougars and bobcats, who may have been snatched from the wild in the U.S. For that reason they can never be bred for introduction back to the wild.

The Ocicat was named for its resemblance to an ocelot, but it has no actual ocelot, or any wild cat, in its family tree—at least since the breed was developed in 1964. Only its appearance earned it a spot on this list. Virginia Daly, a longtime Michigan cat breeder, was trying to get a Siamese cat with Abyssinian points. She bred together cats with Abyssinian, Siamese, and American shorthair lineages. A kitten named Tonga resulted, which had ivory-colored fur with golden spots. Tonga was not used for breeding, but the same parents later produced kittens with the same markings. Ocicats come in a variety of colors, but are known for their spots. The breed standards say an Ocicat should be heavier than it appears and be well-muscled. Ocicats are sociable and their behavior may remind you of a dog—such as the way many like to play fetch. The Ocicat is recognized by TICA as a championship breed. 


It's no surprise that such a stately cat has such royal roots, with its sleek, sophisticated demeanor. Although it was exhibited alongside other blue cats, by 1912, the Russian blue was given its own classification, points out Vetstreet, after its introduction to the United States in the early 1900s. However, says the CFA, the breed really took ahold of pet lovers' hearts after World War II, and it has been gaining popularity steadily since the 1960s.
Thank you for your email. I do think that there might be more going on than stress, and kittens are prone to infectious diseases. If you don't trust that veterinarian that you saw, it would be a good idea to find a second opinion, even if you have to travel a bit to do so, as he could have a problem that needs to be treated. You can also call your veterinarian, let them know that he isn't getting better, and see if they have any other recommendations for him.
Oh, she’s blue all right — with a silver cast that electrifies this feline! A diluted version of the gene responsible for black hair is what produces the silvery coat seen on the Russian Blue. But that’s not the only thing that keeps her in a class of her own: Her bright green eyes, silky-to-the-touch double-layered coat and lithe body make her one of a kind.

What's wrong with my poor gravy? My cat Gravy has become extremely affectionate today and has followed me outside 3x, where he never ever goes! He's following me like a shadow and meowing at me more than normal. He doesn't seem to be in any pain, but his breathing and change of demeanor have me concerned. He's breathing fairly rapidly thru his nose, and he is moving his tail a lot also acting maybe as if he is worried?
My 8 months old male cat is an outdoor cat and these days he started going outside the house fence for the first time( following my older cat) Today started raining and he came all dirty and wet and freezing. I immediately coverd him in a blanket and he’s been sleeping all day and not eating. He looks very tired and everytime I try to wake him he barely raises his head and also sometimes starts breathing very fast. Has he possibly cought a cold or maybe got injured ?? Help please 😩
Example a amazing Maine Coon can cost $1,200 (Parents HCM tested, fixed, shots, everything!) compared to a sickly Maine Coon (Parents not tested, no shots, not fixed and not pretty) post on a classified site that is $500. Some people blame the kitten mills, but the person to blame is some one funding those places. You can do the research, you can pick some one upholding proper ethics.
Two days is still early days for treatment but you should start seeing some improvement in the next day or so, I would say to give it the weekend and if there is no improvement in Jinx’s condition you should return to your Veterinarian on Monday for another examination. Improvement in an animal's condition, especially with antibiotics, can be delayed in most cases so unless your Veterinarian said specifically ‘you’ll see improvement over the next 24 hours’ or something similar you should give it three or four days at least. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
Cat fanciers may think that Russian Blues only have blue coating, but this isn’t always the case. In other cat associations such as New Zealand and Australia, the term “Russians” can be applied to black and white varieties, alongside the traditional blues. Even the U.S. Cat Fanciers Association and TICA allows black-colored Russians or Russian Whites into play in provisional cases.
HELLO . I HAVE SEALPOINT HIMALAYAN CAT AND HIS NAME IS CHOCO. I ALWAYS OBSERVE HIS BREATHING AND IT LOOK LIKE HIS SNOORING ALL THE TIME ESPECIALLY WHEN HE IS ASLEEP. I ALSO NOTICE THAT EVERYTIME HE GOES TO SLEEP, HE ALWAYS PUT HIS HEAD ON A PILLOW OR LOOKING UP IN THE CEILING. I ALSO FEEL THERE IS A SMALL CIRCLE AROUND HIS THROAT WHEN I TOUCH IT. I WAS SO DEEPLY BROKE EVERYTIME I THINK ABOUT MY LITTLE CHOCO's CONDITION . DO YOU HAVE ANY IDEAS ABOUT MY CONCERN? THIS WILL BE A BIG HELP FOR ME MY FRIEND. THANK YOU SO MUCH !!!!
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