My cat seems to be a really healthy cat. I recently brought him to the vet and he had a physical exam done. They didn't find any problems. However, I do notice that he has always been a fast breather. I have two cats, and one has always breathed faster than the other and meowed a lot more than the other. However, other than those two things he seems fine - eats well, very active, skin and fur look great, etc. Do I need to be worried enough to take him to get a blood test?
A normal healthy cat will take 20-30 regular breaths per minute. The air travels into your cat’s lungs and is used to oxygenate the blood, which is then circulated throughout your cat’s vital organs. When a cat is suffering from rapid breathing, this breath rate increases and often becomes irregular, or shallow. This can often be an indication that your cat is not able to bring enough oxygen into the lungs to supply their body’s need. Rapid breathing is a symptom that can be caused by a number of illnesses or injuries. Since regular breathing is vital, if your cat is suffering from rapid breathing (also known as tachypnea) it is a serious and life threatening condition and you should seek immediate veterinary care.
Without examining Narla I cannot say for certain what the underlying cause for the breathing difficulties are, however it is possible that this is a side effect of the flea and tick medication especially if given an incorrect dose or given a product intended for use in dogs. You should visit your Veterinarian since Narla is having respiratory issues as soon as possible. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

When the Russian Blue cat sees his favorite family member, though, it’s a whole different matter. This cat will follow the individual around the whole house and can sometimes hitch a ride on that person’s shoulder. The Foreign Blue greets the owner at the door and is sensitive to your mood, i.e., with playtime or just by settling down next to you. Owners rarely hear the cat’s voice unless it’s mealtime. Some of the things an Archangel Blue appreciates are a hearty game of fetch, a window with a great outdoor view and pats on the head.

This semi-long-haired feline is native to Norway, according to the Cat Fancier’s Association, and everything it does, it does when it’s good and ready.  (You got that?) They’re described as sensitive, social and friendly but on their own terms. Despite their outdoorsy name, they’re quite happy inside but do require a scratching post and cat tree — preferably with an outdoor view — to keep them stimulated.


This cat breed has a very interesting history. Sometimes referred to as Archangel Blues, the cats are believed to have originated in the Archangel Isles, located in Northern Russia, and may have been pets of Russian czars long time past. They’re considered a natural breed and not sprung from interbreeding programmes. The thick, warm coat is due to the cat needing something to keep warm against the frozen tundras and the cold, harsh winters of the country.
The Russian Blue is not believed to be related to the other three shorthaired solid blue breeds: Thailand’s Korat, France’s Chartreux, and Britain’s British Blue (now called the British Shorthair). The four breeds have distinct differences in coat type, conformation, and personality, although the Korat, Chartreux, and Russian Blue share a similar silver-blue sheen. Since all four of these breeds have been around for so long that their ancestries are shrouded in legend and conjecture, a common ancestor is possible.
Anemia is a condition characterised by a reduced number of red blood (also known as erythrocytes) cells in the blood. Is not a disease in itself but a symptom of an underlying condition. It can be due to the premature destruction of the red blood cells, decreased production (due to cancers, kidney disease, certain infections or drugs), blood loss, tumours, blood clotting disorders and parasites such as fleas and hookworm.
Currently, most authentic Chausies produced are late generation cats with fully domestic temperaments. Their TICA registration certificates will usually indicate that they are "C" generation or "SBT," which nearly always means they are four generations or more beyond the jungle cat (F. chaus). In cases where they are "A" or "B" generation, it is usually because they have been recently outcrossed to another domestic breed to improve specific cosmetic traits, but the cats are nonetheless more than four generations beyond the handful of nondomestic ancestors.

A cat may have rapid breathing for a variety of different reasons which may include infections, pain, high temperature (to cool down), heart failure among other causes; if your Veterinarian was unable to identify a cause, you should keep a close eye on Skittle and see if there is anything which occurs before an episode as it may be a reaction to anxiety from something. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
^ "Colorpoint Longhair" has multiple meanings and "Javanese" has been used for at least one other breed; the WCF uses the "Javanese" name for the Oriental Longhair (not colorpointed). The WCF has also merged the colorpointed Javanese/Colorpoint Longhair, the Himalayan and the Colourpoint Shorthair of other registries into a single breed, the Colourpoint. In the CFA, the TICA and some other registries, the Javanese/Colorpoint Longhair has merged back into the Balinese as a division

Class clown — there’s always one! Purina notes that these confident and friendly creatures stand out because of their clowning around. These short-tailed cats, who were bred in the U.S. starting in the 1960s, according to TICA, make a great family pet since they’re sociable with humans of all ages and even other friends of the four-legged variety. They’re all about fun — but aren’t in need of your undivided attention — and don’t tend to attach themselves to one person.  
Thank you for you email. unfortunately, without examining Kai, i can't comment on what might be going on with him. He needs to see his veterinarian to try and determine what is going on with him and how to treat him. If he seems to be in distress and unable to catch his breath, taking him to the emergency clinic tonight is most appropriate. I hope that he is okay.
Hybrids have always been popular. They make people feel connected with the wilderness outside. We can’t all own lions and tigers (nor should we), but so many people want little felines that resemble their larger, exotic cousins. Some breeders have begun breeding smaller wild species with domestic cats to create beautiful hybrids that are safe for the average cat owner to live with. Although hybrids are still controversial, there is no denying how unique and beautiful they are. Take a look at the most popular hybrids below.
Origin: The exact country of origin is unknown but the Russian Blue first appeared in cat shows in London. Though, it is widely believed that the breed is most likely from Russia because their thick double coat suggests they had been well adapted to living in very cold climates. The common story is that British sailors fell in love with this breed of cat on their travels and brought them home from the White Sea port town of Archangel. In 1871, the blue coated cat first made its appearance in a cat show at the Crystal Palace in London.

Feeding tamed big cats raw fish, raw porkchops, raw beef or raw rabbit together in an enclosed space will activate love mode. They can either be fed it or it can be dropped next to them. After being fed and paired together, love hearts will show around the breeding pair, and after around 5–10 minutes, a cub (either the same type as one of the parents or a hybrid) will be produced and the naming screen will appear.

It is difficult to say what is causing the rapid breathing or the seizures a few weeks ago, a slightly elevated white blood cell count may indicate infection or inflammation but isn’t really diagnostic of anything specific (a differential count may help). Monitor Molly over the next few days especially when the antibiotics are finished to see if there are any other symptoms developing which may help narrow in on a cause. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
Oh, she’s blue all right — with a silver cast that electrifies this feline! A diluted version of the gene responsible for black hair is what produces the silvery coat seen on the Russian Blue. But that’s not the only thing that keeps her in a class of her own: Her bright green eyes, silky-to-the-touch double-layered coat and lithe body make her one of a kind.
Watching the rate of breathing is one of the simple observations that you can make on a pet cat at home. This cat has a problem known as "tachypnoea", which means rapid breathing. IF you watch her side carefully, you'll notice that her sides are moving much more quickly than a normal cat at rest. Her problem is being investigated, so the precise cause is under review, but it's most likely that she has "hyperthyroidism", caused by a benign tumour on her thyroid gland

This breathing may be normal for Gracie, or may be a sign of distress and not being able to get oxygen the way that she needs to. Since I cannot assess her or her respiratory system, it would be best to have her examined by a veterinarian. They'll be able to look at her, listen to her heart and lungs, and assess her general health to see if she is having any breathing issues that need attention.


Russian Blues have a tolerant nature toward children who treat them kindly and respectfully. They will even put up with the clumsy pats given by toddlers, as if they recognize that no harm is meant, and if necessary they will walk away or climb out of reach to escape being bonked on the head. That said, the patient and gentle Russian Blue should always be protected from rough treatment, so always supervise very young children when they want to pet the cat.
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