The Russian Blue is a gentle cat with a somewhat shy nature around strangers. They are devoted to and affectionate with their loved ones. Sensitive to their owner’s moods, the Russian Blue will greet you at the door, find a quiet seat next to you, or fetch a toy at playtime. In fact, “fetching” is a favorite pastime for Russians and their owners! Pull out the vacuum cleaner, and the Russian will find a safer and quieter location. Relatively quiet-voiced (except perhaps at mealtime), the Russian Blue appreciates a pat on the head, a window from which to watch the birds, and, of course, the comforts of home. Minimal grooming is required; regular nail clipping, good nutrition, an occasional combing, and lots of petting keep your Russian Blue pet looking spectacular.
Sharleen ear temperature change hot to cold 4 times overnight. Sound stuffy when purr. Breath heavily and urinate lots and often last few weeks. Took her to the vet for blood work and check up today. She seem worse and in pain. Lower lip is now swollen, right front leg a little limping. Not active all afternoon. Night fall and she seem restless. What can I do to ease her pain while waiting for blood work result?
Conservation is a very complex issue and captive settings cannot duplicate it, so the important work of saving entire eco systems is not taught and not done in a captive setting. What’s worse is that lip service is paid to these worthy objectives and when you pay to see captive wildlife you walk away thinking you did something good when in fact you contributed to the problem. You paid to see a cat in a cage. You made sure that industry continues to breed and exploit more cats. You did not pay to save the wild and all of the wonderous and magnifient creatures who call it home. You put another nail in the coffin for the planet.
My about 8 or 9 year old cat started breathing heavily today after me and friend did some major cleaning. She was diagnosed with feline leukemia when we took her to the vet for the first time after we got her when she was about 5 months to a year as a stray. It's never bothered her at all though, she's never had an issue. She's also never breathed like this before. So I didn't know if it was because all of the dust. The dust was so bad that we had masks while we cleaned. We just thought it was the dust in the air and I've opened up all the windows to air everything out. It was also 70 something degrees outside today and she does go in and out of the house.Other than her breathing she is eating, drinking and acting completely normal. So I was just going to take her to the vet if she was still breathing like this tomorrow, but the more I search online the more nervous I get that it's not just the dust and she may have a serious issue going on.
This breed does not like change, preferring for things to be uniform and predictable. It can be thrown off when dinnertime is altered, and is nit-picky about hygiene. It will not even enter its litter box if it is dirty. In the early years, this breed developed a reputation at shows for being difficult to work with because of traits like these. The Russian Blue was gentle and happy at home, but at shows it was visibly discontent and temperamental. Popularity declined and fewer Russian Blues were being shown until breeders focused on improving the attitudes of the breed through selective breeding and behavior management (e.g., soft music, recording of show noises, crystals, herbal remedies). This commitment to the breed paid off, and today the Russian Blue is a happy participant at cat shows.
There are good and bad with everything. The genetic code is being increased with more offspring from more individual tigers, you will have a stronger genetic code. The question is animal quality of life. But ask yourself this. If a tiger is brought into the world to an abusive trainer, would that tiger rather be unborn? Hopefully we can rescue them when they are abused, but a living being is precious and always wanted in this world. 

There are other reasons, in the real world, why it doesn’t work, which includes the fact that human – big cat conflict is one of the main reasons cats are wiped out of areas. Captive breeding not only selectively chooses animals that are least fit for the wild but also conditions the cats to not fear humans. That increases the conflict and the result is that not only would the offending cat be killed, but likely any wild cat seen in the area would be hunted down and killed in a case of mistaken identity. That escalates the extinction of cats in the wild.
Hi, our 15 year old girl, Buddha has gotten super weak so fast. She had a lump on her nose/lip area, which contributed to a number of doctor visits. They took blood, sample of the tissue, etc, everything came back normal. So the vet told us that if it doesn't bother us, to leave it be. She was still ok at that point just had that lump. Then after our last visit which was very stressful to her to say the least, when she came back home, we noticed that she was limping, that was new to us. The gradually, she started losing weight, so within two weeks she dropped almost 8 pounds, yet she is eating and very excited about it still. And now started the panting which has gotten worse a week ago, she's breathing heavy, with her whole stomach moving. And there are time when she's breathing with her mouse open and her tongue slightly sticking out. And she has started to pee all over the house, she still goes in her litter, but also all over the place. She is still eating, she's not hiding, still like to be pet and be around us, but at times I feel like she's so miserable. We don't know what to do at this point, another visit to the vet will be super stressful to her. And I have no idea what they can do, since last 4 visits did absolutely nothing but make her worse. :(
There are many possible causes for rapid breathing in cats which may include allergies or irritation; however it may also be due to more serious conditions including infections, heart failure, anaemia among other causes. Without examining Lexa I cannot say what the specific cause is, you should visit your Veterinarian if Lexa’s resting respiratory rate is above 40 breaths per minute to determine the cause and treat accordingly. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

My female cat, Bella, is almost 18 years old. In the past she has been diagnosed with feline leukemia, but does not show any signs of illness from that, vet said it was dormant and she no doubt has had it since birth. She is strictly an indoor cat. In the last 18 months, she has lost about 3 pounds. Up until a few weeks ago, she was eating and drinking as normal.
There are a few possible conditions which may affect a new mother a few weeks after queening which may include eclampsia, infections among other conditions which may lead to difficulty in walking and breathing. Since Noor is still nursing her kittens, you should take her to your Veterinarian for an examination (good to take the kittens too as separation may stress her) and see what they find with an examination and blood test. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

If your cat is having difficulty breathing, this can be a life threatening emergency. It is important to have your cat seen by a veterinarian as soon as possible. You will need to give a thorough history of your cat's health, onset of symptoms, and possible incidents that might have preceded this condition. During the examination, the veterinarian will carefully observe how your cat breathes, and will listen to its chest for evidence of a heart murmur or fluid in the lungs. Your cat's gum color will be carefully evaluated as well, since the color of the gums can indicate whether oxygen is being delivered to the organs (hypoxemia) effectively, or if it there is a low red blood cell count (anemia). Your veterinarian may try to get your cat to cough by pressing on its windpipe. If your cat is having extreme difficulty breathing, the veterinarian will give your cat oxygen to help it breathe before doing any more tests.

This is about my cat named eren. He was fine when he was a kitten other than being feral and not used to people. But about two months ago, he started doing this thing where he is breathing fine and all one minute and the next it sounds like his breath is coming out in quick bursts almost like coughing. And it always goes for about 8 or so bursts of breath. Is this something I should take him to the vet about
Hmmm where did you get this information? I haven't heard of any Bobcat/Siamese crossing. Just because a cat has a bobbed tail, does not mean it was crossed with a Bobcat. When talking Bobcat, do you mean an American Bobtail, or a similar breed, or a true 100% Bobcat. There is a breed of cat that, as the legend goes, has been crossed with a wild Bobcat. The breed is known as the Pixie Bob. I have 4 Pixies and yes, they do have some traits that do resemble a Bobcat. Not just with their coloring and markings, but with their behaviors as well. Amber and Boris, pictured in my signature, are true wild Bobcats. The idea of crossing a Bobcat with any domestic cat is not as easy as some may think. For one, Bobcats are very aggressive breeders and have been known to kill each other while breeding in captivity. The thought of putting any domestic cat in with an intact male Bobcat is just asking for trouble. The legend of the Pixie Bob is that this breeding took place in the wild, with the crossing of a male Bobcat with a female domestic "barn cat". These male Bobcats may have been older males, who no longer could compete in the wild with much younger males. Whether or not this legend is true has not been proven. Yes, the look of the Pixie Bob does resemble a Bobcat to some degree. The Toyger cat, a new breed of domestic cat, has been bred to resemble a small tiger, the same size as most domestics. The coloring and markings are there, but there is now way that this cat was crossed with a tiger. These markings and coloring come about by selective breeding and take years to produce the final results the breeders are looking for.
If the resting respiratory rate is above 40 breaths per minute, you should ideally visit a Veterinarian for an examination as it can be difficult to narrow in on a specific cause; there are a few possible causes for this rapid breathing including infections, laryngeal disorders, pain among other causes. You should visit a Veterinarian as soon as possible for an examination to narrow in on a cause. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
Chester was taken in last night for an abscess removal surgery on his neck. I got him back this morning and he is having trouble using his litter box. are there any suggestions to help him use it? also, the vet prescribed 2 antibiotics but no pain reliever for chester. he has a drain in his face and i could only imagine how painful it will be for the next few days until he gets it removed. i was told that chester was given a pain medication shot. how long is this supposed to last? it doesn't seem humane to let him go back home without the necessary pain relief medication. In addition, his breathing is quite fast. is that normal for a post abscess removal surgery?
An increase in respiratory rate may be an indicator of pain especially if she is limping; without examining Isabella I cannot say whether this is due to pain or another cause (infection, heart disease etc…). I would restrict Isabella’s movements and monitor her for the time being but if it continues or the respiratory rate is above 40 breaths per minute you should visit your Veterinarian for an examination. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
Please do not ask us to sell you a kitten, nor to refer you to a broker, dealer or breeder.  These animals do not make good pets and if you have the experience and expertise to care for one for the rest of it’s life, then you should be donating your time to caring for the hundreds of unwanted ones who have ended up in real sanctuaries.  Real sanctuaries do not breed.

Thank you for you email. unfortunately, without examining Kai, i can't comment on what might be going on with him. He needs to see his veterinarian to try and determine what is going on with him and how to treat him. If he seems to be in distress and unable to catch his breath, taking him to the emergency clinic tonight is most appropriate. I hope that he is okay.
A cat’s resting respiratory rate shouldn’t go over 30 or 35 breaths per minute, anything above this should be checked by your Veterinarian. As a Nurse you will know that the respiratory rate may change in response to pain, oxygenation of blood, cardiac output as well as other factors; there are no specific diagnoses which list rapid breathing as their only symptom as other symptoms may not be observable including anaemia, heart conditions (possibly a murmur) etc… Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
You’ll be immediately drawn to the Russian Blue’s shining green eyes and the silver-like, smooth coat. While majority of the coat is colored bright blue, the foot may sometimes have a lavender base that darkens as it travels upwards to the guard hair tips, which is the cat’s protective topcoat. The ends of each strand of fur sparkles with silver, often resembling the tips of spears when the light catches it.
Black ticked tabby Chausies have black ticking, black stripes on the inside of the upper legs and to a lesser extent on the outside, black rings on the tail, a black tail tip, and black tabby markings around the eyes. They are also known as brown ticked tabbies because, although the markings are black, the background color is brownish. The background color can vary in hue across a large range. While Chausie breeders try to avoid producing the very reddish brown background color seen in the Abyssinian breed, they do produce everything else in the range. Background color may be reddish gold, it may be a light golden brown, warm beige, cold beige, and even a very cool light gray with just a hint of brown in it. The latter is a very wild looking background color. Random polygenes influence the background color. Every time a black ticked tabby kitten is born, breeders start guessing what the background color will be. But no one really knows until the cat matures.
Four of the five species of the big cats (the Panthera genus – lion, tiger, leopard, jaguar and snow leopard), the exception being the snow leopard can hybridize with each other to produce numerous hybrids. In fact, breeding of two different pantheras to produce hybrid big cats has been banned in many zoos and animal sanctuaries due to no conservation value of the hybrid, and the risk it poses on the mother that gives birth to it.
Polydactyl cats, also called "polydacts" or "Hemingway cats" are sometimes confused as a "breed," however they fall under the domestic cat category. Truthfully, most registries do not accept polydact cats in their standards. Polydactyl means "many toes," and is considered a genetic defect. Ernest Hemingway had a number of polydactyl cats at his estate, and he allowed them to breed indiscriminately, so, many years after his death, the descendants of his original cats still live there. Polydacts may come in any variety of colors and color patterns.
Big Cat Rescue is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization, FEID 59-3330495. Florida law requires that all charities soliciting donations disclose their registration number and the percentage of your donation that goes to the cause and the amount that goes to the solicitor. We do not utilize professional solicitors, so 0% of your donation goes to a professional solicitor, 100% goes to Big Cat Rescue. Non-program expenses are funded from tour income, so 100% of your donations go to supporting the cats and stopping the abuse. A COPY OF THE OFFICIAL REGISTRATION AND FINANCIAL INFORMATION FOR BIG CAT RESCUE, A FL-BASED NONPROFIT CORPORATION (REGISTRATION NO. CH 11409), MAY BE OBTAINED FROM THE DIVISION OF CONSUMER SERVICES BY CALLING TOLL-FREE 1-800-435-7352 WITHIN THE STATE OR BY VISITING www.800helpfla.com. REGISTRATION DOES NOT IMPLY ENDORSEMENT, APPROVAL, OR RECOMMENDATION BY THE STATE.  
Took my 13 year old snowshoe Boss …who is always inside…to Vet ER because this morning he had no interest in food or water, just laid down, looked out of it. …and then I noticed he was breathing faster than normal, no panting or open mouth….just not the relaxed gentle breathing he usually does. Complete physical exam, said he seemed normal and if I was still worried to come back for cxr of lungs and possible blood work…but at least cxr. That was at about 10:30am…. it’s now 6:30pm…… nothing changed…still sleeping and lower chest almost abdominal area, fast breathing…prob about 60pm…… Safe to wait till morning or not? Dr didn’t seem extremely worried!? TU
Care: Russian Blue cats are fairly easy to care for. Their coats simply need to be brushed once a week so that they stay can show off their beautiful blue color. They may require more brushing when they are going through a season of shedding. Trim their nails and clean their ears as needed to keep them looking lovely. And, as with any cat, it is important to regularly brush their teeth to prevent periodontal disease. If you are looking for a hypoallergenic cat then the Russian Blue cat is a great candidate. They produce less of the Fel D1 protein which is the true cause for your allergic reaction. There is no cat that is 100% allergy free so increasing the frequency of grooming and bathing your furry friend will also help.
The PIxiebob breed began as a result of natural mating. Carol Ann Brewer observed bob-tailed cats in the Cascade Mountains of Washington state. She adopted one of these cats in 1985, who then mated with a neighbor's cat. She obtained more of the "legend cats," bob-tailed local cats that somewhat resembled bobcats, and are thought to be results of natural matings between bobcats and domestic cats, although no proof exists. Pixiebobs are tall cats with back legs slightly longer than the front legs. They have thick double coats that may be short or long. Breed standards allow for up to seven toes in a PIxiebob, the only championship breed allowing for polydactly. Pixiebobs gained championship status with the TICA in 1998. Although Pixiebobs are often stone-faced like a wild cat, they are loyal and make good pets. 

This is simply not true. The bad comments I have seen have only been from owner who should have not owned a cat to begin with. People who don’t have problems don’t go posting on the internet about how they don’t have issues. Just like a golden retriever or any other more athletic intelligent breed some people simple don’t match with the breed. People who buy an athletic type animal yet wont met its requirement for attention and mental stimulation.

Causes for an increase in respiratory rate may include pain, infections, heart disease, respiratory tract obstruction, increased temperature among others; a cat’s resting respiratory rate shouldn’t be higher than around 40 breaths per minute, if it is higher than this then I would advise you visit your Veterinarian for an examination to determine the underlying cause. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

My cat, Arwen, just came out to the living room limping badly with her front right leg kinda knuckling over. The leg and paw is cool to the touch in comparison to the rest of her body and her shoulder blade is just flat. I pinched her toes a little and there was no reaction. She's also breathing kind of shallow and fast with it seems like she's breathing from her stomach not her chest. She is crying a little bit but not when we touch the leg, onky when she tries to move around while laying down.
A loss of appetite and lethargy are both vague symptoms but the rapid breathing is concerning, you should visit your Veterinarian for an examination as rapid breathing may be associated with pain, anaemia, heart disease among many other conditions. Without examining Ozzy I cannot determine the specific underlying cause of the symptoms and would recommend that a visit to your Veterinarian be made before the weekend. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
Los Angeles cat breeder Judy Sugden has been working since the late eighties to breed a house cat that resembles a tiger. The result is the Toyger, a registered breed that has a lineage beginning with domestic shorthairs and Bengals selected for their markings. Toygers are now available from breeders all over the world. The breed is still in development, and TICA now has the toyger classified as a championship breed. 
Anemia is a condition characterised by a reduced number of red blood (also known as erythrocytes) cells in the blood. Is not a disease in itself but a symptom of an underlying condition. It can be due to the premature destruction of the red blood cells, decreased production (due to cancers, kidney disease, certain infections or drugs), blood loss, tumours, blood clotting disorders and parasites such as fleas and hookworm.

We receive requests every week from people who are looking for some place to take their “pet” cat.  Each year we have to turn away more than 100 such “pets“.  These unwitting owners have discovered that all exotic cats, both male and female, neutered or not, spray and bite when they reach sexual maturity.  (They don’t just spray a little either.  We are talking about buckets of the foulest smelling urine, all over your house, your things and you. If you don’t believe me, watch this clip of a neutered lion HERE)  Moving them out to the yard means your neighbors will soon be complaining that your place smells like a zoo.   By the time they find us they have discovered that the zoos do not want their animals, that no one is willing to buy them and that they can’t even give them away.  Refuges are usually full to capacity and cannot take in another hungry mouth to feed.  All too often, these “pets” are turned out to fend for themselves, where they surely die of starvation or are euthanized.
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