You shouldn’t notice breathing rates over 40 breaths per minute in a resting cat; an increase in respiration may be due to inadequate airflow, malpositioning of the throat, respiratory infection, heart issues among other causes. Without examining Roxanne I cannot say for sure what is happening, keep a close eye on her and if you decide to have her fixed speak with your Veterinarian then. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
Hello, I adopted a cat 6 months ago and he is almost 1 now. Ever since I got him, he has breathed fast and noisy. He was treated for URI’s a couple times and lung worms once. There was slight improvement when he was being treated with Panacur and prednisolone, but it is back to it’s fast pace. He is otherwise normal, eating and drinking fine (maybe eating too much..), playing fine. He sleeps a lot during the day but then will be a wild hyper cat after I get home from work. He doesn’t open mouth breathe (except once after laser play), no coughing or vomit. His poo however is extremely stinky and greasy looking. He is not in pain. He is about 13 pounds and he eats Iams Indoor dry food and Blue Buffalo wet food. Any suggestions? My vet is at a loss.
There are various different causes for rapid breathing and rapid heart rate which may be caused by stress, poisoning, infections, anaemia, heart disease among many other conditions; if there are behavioural changes like hiding there may be fear or another similar component. Without examining Wagamama I cannot say whether or not there is a cause for concern or not, but you should have your Veterinarian check her over to be on the safe side. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

One important note to keep in mind with this breed is its love of food. It will eat beyond its need and ask for seconds, making it a sure candidate for weight related conditions if it is allowed to eat as much as it wants. The best prevention is measuring the food and giving it only at assigned times of the day, and making sure that everyone in the house knows that they cannot give the cat too many treats or scraps.
We can only recommend you to take your kitty to the vet. It seems like s/he still has an appetite, which is a good sign, but panting might be an indicator for something else. Are there any other signs of discomfort? Salivating or does s/he have blue gums? Whether yes or no, you might want to go get a check-up to make sure everything is safe. A veterinarian will know how to guide you and recommend treatment if there is an underlying medical issue. Best of luck!
In 1900, Carl Hagenbeck crossed a female leopard with a Bengal tiger. The stillborn offspring had a mixture of spots, rosettes and stripes. Henry Scherren wrote, “A male tiger from Penang served two female Indian leopards, and twice with success. Details are not given and the story concludes somewhat lamely. ‘The leopardess dropped her cubs prematurely, the embryos were in the first stage of development and were scarcely as big as young mice.’ Of the second leopardess there is no mention.”
Hi! This is my first time using this website. I adopted a kitten from the humane society two months ago. She is currently 6 months old. She is an extremely sweet and loving kitten and have had no problems with her except for some gum swelling around 5 mo. I took her to a vet and was told she was fine, the gum swelling went down and she lost some baby teeth. I assumed the gum swelling was from that. I am now noticing in her rapid breathing when she is resting, and more recently, at random times she makes a monotone short snore sound. It’s almost as if she is having issues breathing. I have noticed zero behavioral changes. She seems to be doing fine, however I know cats can hide their issues well. I will add she is a Siamese kitten and talks like one!
It’s human nature to become a creature of habit. However, there’s no room for health practioners to be complacent or lack empathic best practices. Your vet (and even your own doctor) should readily give you a plan that prepares you for multiple scenarios with situational based set of instructions of what to look for and what to do if things change. That said, the patients also have the responsibility of participating in the process. This can include keeping them on point by being their supervisor, so-to-speak, during the visit and making sure they do everything they’re supposed to do.
Anticoagulants (blood thinners) and antiaggregants (antiplatelet) – These drugs reduce the occurrence of blood clots forming. Anticoagulants work by delaying the clotting of blood; common medications include Warfarin and Heparin. Antiaggregants stop platelets from clumping together to form a plug. Aspirin and clopidogrel are two drugs in this category.
I cannot think of a connection between the running after another cat and the symptoms that she is presenting with except possibly hypoglycemia (normally causes an increase in appetite) due to the blood glucose level being too low. I would suggest to rub a little corn syrup or honey on the gums to see if there is any improvement in Cupcake’s symptoms; ensure you keep Cupcake hydrated and visit your Veterinarian on Monday morning, if the symptoms increase in severity visit an Emergency Veterinarian. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
Ligers enjoy swimming, which is a characteristic of tigers, and are very sociable like lions. Ligers (and tigons) exist only in captivity because the habitats of the parental species do not overlap in the wild. Historically, when the Asiatic Lion was prolific, the territories of lions and tigers did overlap and there are legends of ligers existing in the wild.
It would put my mind at ease if someone could tell me more about the possibilities of bobcat-domestic breeding, or point me somewhere that would explain just what such an offspring (if possible) would look like. I keep coming up with incredibly vague answers from the websites I've searched. I assume she's just a domestic, but I thought I should look into it more before she grows larger.
Given the signs that you are describing for Millie, it would be best to have her seen by a veterinarian. She may have asthma, allergies, or another condition that requires treatment. Your veterinarian will be able to look at her, determine what might be going on, and recommend any testing or treatment that might be necessary. I hope that she is okay.
Temperament: The Russian Blue is a distinguished, reserved, sweet cat. They make wonderful, loving companions but they may be reluctant to be social with people other than their family. They will bond with you and become fiercely loyal. Often, Russian Blues want to be right where you are, at all times. They will follow you around, helping you with whatever tasks you need to do and will happily snuggle up when it is time to rest. They do enjoy games and particularly love to teach their human counterparts how to fetch. They are playful and get along well with children who are gentle and treat them with respect. They are great pets and wonderful companions for families and will quickly wiggle their way into everyone's hearts.
At the top of the list we find the Savannah F-1. This cat is HUGE. Its a bit of a cheater, its a domestic cat, but with a wild background. A Siamese cat was crossbred with an African (wild) Serval cat. This breed has only recently been accepted as an official breed, and its probably the large domestic kitty around. The Savannah can get as big as a good sized dog and you better not mess with this puss. Unlike many other cats, Savannah’s usually love water, can be walked on a leash and come close to dogs in behavior. Most Savannah owners report that they are very gently and loyal companions, but don’t forget that this domestic cat can still be  “wild” at heart. Not bad for a house cat!
Without examining Midnight it is difficult to give a diagnosis since lethargy and loss of appetite are vague symptoms common with many different conditions; infections, parasites (regardless of indoor or not), foreign objects, poisoning, spoiled food, injury (fell from somewhere) among many other causes may lead to these symptoms. You should ensure that Midnight is kept hydrated, but if there is no improvement you should visit your Veterinarian for an examination. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
Interaction between your pet and children should always be supervised to prevent rough treatment or a crying child, but all in all the Foreign Blue makes for an excellent house cat. This breed tends to choose one family member and make it his or her life’s mission to follow that person around and give constant attention to. But this doesn’t mean that they won’t show affection to other household members, particularly to those who need it. These loving cats are known to calm crying babies by clowning around and even patting your face when you feel down.

Four of the five species of the big cats (the Panthera genus – lion, tiger, leopard, jaguar and snow leopard), the exception being the snow leopard can hybridize with each other to produce numerous hybrids. In fact, breeding of two different pantheras to produce hybrid big cats has been banned in many zoos and animal sanctuaries due to no conservation value of the hybrid, and the risk it poses on the mother that gives birth to it.
The Russian Blue is robust, marked by strong sinews, a velvety fur and fine outlines. This breed is closely related to 3 other cat breeds, namely the British Blue (or the British Shorthair), the French Chartreux and Thailand Korat because they share the same hue and have short hair, but the similarity ends there. Each of the aforementioned blue breeds have their own fun personality and coat characteristics.
There are various causes for respiratory symptoms in cats and without examining Nala or seeing an episode it is difficult to give you a definitive ‘that’s normal’ or not; if Nala is in respiratory difficulty you should return to a Veterinarian for an examination to be on the safe side. Conditions like laryngeal paralysis may cause intermittent respiratory difficulty but I cannot say with any certainty. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
Hi Farhood, thanks for reaching out to us! Thanks for taking care of this little stray 🙂 If you say she doesn’t display any of the symptoms and is eating well, it wouldn’t seem like she has any underlying issue. That is pretty hot, so make sure she has an area nicely covered by shade (plants, garden, etc). She isn’t panting, is she? Panting shows signs of heat exhaustion. Here, please read our article on keeping cats cool in the summer. Hope it helps! Best of luck.

This is about my cat. He was fine when he was a kitten other than being feral and not used to people. But about two months ago, he started doing this thing where he is breathing fine and all one minute and the next it sounds like his breath is coming out in quick bursts almost like coughing. And it always goes for about 8 or so bursts of breath. Is this something I should take him to the vet about ?
Russian Blue cats can take care of and amuse themselves when their owners are away or preoccupied, but they do expect a lot of “me” time and play when you or your family members get home. Moreover, this breed doesn’t like to be ignored and demands equal affection from the one he or she gives. The cat can become overly anxious, stressed or fearful if you don’t pay attention for long periods of time.
There is no approved adulticide (medications to kill adult heartworms) treatments for cats. Adulticides are themselves dangerous. A single dead worm can be fatal in cats as it can break away and cause a blockage of the pulmonary artery (pulmonary embolism). Heartworms in cats have a shorter lifespan than those in dogs; therefore it is preferable to manage symptoms and use a wait and see approach.
Causes for an increase in respiratory rate may include pain, infections, heart disease, respiratory tract obstruction, increased temperature among others; a cat’s resting respiratory rate shouldn’t be higher than around 40 breaths per minute, if it is higher than this then I would advise you visit your Veterinarian for an examination to determine the underlying cause. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

11 month old kitten with rapid breathing since we got him at 3 months old. Acting normal, voiding without issue, playing, eating and drinking. Normal behaviors. As a nurse myself I always questioned his fast breathing but because he is a kitten I let it slide thinking that maybe they, like babies/children have faster respiratory rates. He is half tabby half Maine coon and is about 12-13lbs. His respiratory rate at rest is about 75-85. He has only panted about 3 times that we’ve seen during intense play time with our other cat. No coughing or runny nose. I’m very worried now that he is approaching a year old. I’ve been through the ringer with expensive tests at the vet with another cat and I’m wondering what are the baseline tests for this that I can start with that could lead to answers? And what are the most common diagnosises with rapid breathing being the only symptom? Thoughts and many thanks in advance!
Without examining Midnight it is difficult to give a diagnosis since lethargy and loss of appetite are vague symptoms common with many different conditions; infections, parasites (regardless of indoor or not), foreign objects, poisoning, spoiled food, injury (fell from somewhere) among many other causes may lead to these symptoms. You should ensure that Midnight is kept hydrated, but if there is no improvement you should visit your Veterinarian for an examination. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
My cat is recovering from having a tumor taken off of his neck. He is not thriving and today i found that he has blood in his urine. He is also breathing in short bursts. The doc said unless he seems very uncomfortable, it can wait till tomorrow, MOnday. I want the cat to see his usual vet, instead of taking him to emergency. What would you do? I don’t want him to suffer, so i gave him some pain meds.

Pneumonia is an infectious/inflammatory disorder of the lung parenchyma. Tiny bronchi fill the lungs; each one ends in smaller sacs known as alveoli which contain tiny blood vessels. Oxygen is added to the blood and carbon dioxide removed via the alveoli. Pneumonia causes these alveoli to fill with pus and fluids which affect the lung’s ability to exchange gases. There are several causes including infection (viral, fungal, bacterial, parasitic), aspiration of gastric contents or medications.


So, my cat has been breathing fast for the last two days. She has been eating, drinking water and peeing/pooping normally as it seems... We had a big clean up in the house and all of us (humans and cats) were sneezing for a while so that is one of the possibilities, I guess...The other thing is that we had the sand of the sand box changed to one with a smell so maybe that was giving her allergies or something... These are two possibilities but I'm still worried. Do you think I should be concerned?
A cat’s resting respiratory rate shouldn’t go over 30 or 35 breaths per minute, anything above this should be checked by your Veterinarian. As a Nurse you will know that the respiratory rate may change in response to pain, oxygenation of blood, cardiac output as well as other factors; there are no specific diagnoses which list rapid breathing as their only symptom as other symptoms may not be observable including anaemia, heart conditions (possibly a murmur) etc… Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

Currently, most authentic Chausies produced are late generation cats with fully domestic temperaments. Their TICA registration certificates will usually indicate that they are "C" generation or "SBT," which nearly always means they are four generations or more beyond the jungle cat (F. chaus). In cases where they are "A" or "B" generation, it is usually because they have been recently outcrossed to another domestic breed to improve specific cosmetic traits, but the cats are nonetheless more than four generations beyond the handful of nondomestic ancestors.
Tilson says tigers are the most charismatic animal on earth. Their appeal is universal. “They are the alpha predator who used to kill and eat us,” he says. “We cannot help but be in awe of their power and grace. Tigers represent everything fine and decent and powerful. Everything those people would like to be. It’s all an ego trip—big guns, big trucks, and big tigers.”
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So beloved was this breed to the Egyptians, that they are evident in their ancient artwork — and it’s easy to see why. Their mascara-like markings, stunning green eyes, and elegance are all noted by TICA. The shy, loyal breed with keen senses tends to have a “naturally worried” look, which is perhaps a nod to their aversion to loud noises. Hillspet.com says they enjoy a perch — like a bookshelf or fridge — from which to survey their domain, which most certainly belongs to them.
The Russian Blue has a reputation as a gentle, quiet cat, somewhat shy, but don’t get the wrong idea. This cat may have a reserved nature, but he loves to play (being especially fond of retrieving) and enjoys jumping or climbing to high places where he can study people and situations at his leisure before making up his mind about whether he wants to get involved. Guests will not receive his immediate attention and may never see him unless he decides they are worthy of his notice, but toward family members, especially his favored person, he is ever loyal, following them through the house and even riding on a shoulder. The Russian Blue is a sensitive cat who doesn’t like to be ignored and will be hurt if he doesn’t receive the same amount of affection he gives. Lack of attention can cause him to become anxious or fearful.
My cat (8-9 months) just got spayed 2 days ago. I have another cat so to be sure the wound was safe we got her a vest instead of a cone. she came home that afternoon and she was very quiet and would not walk around, we thought it was normal due to the vest and anesthesia. yesterday we noticed she isn't eating, drinking or going to the litterbox on her own. she only wants to lay down and sleep. If we bring her to the water, food, and litter box she'll do her things and just lay down again. we kept thinking she was just tired or did not like to walk with the vest so we went to sleep this morning o notice she is not in her bed but inside the transporter box, and breathing quite fast. My boyfriend took her to the vet, to do an X-ray and they said she had some pulmonary infection but they can't do the necessary tests to pinpoint exactly what is the issue because it requires anesthesia and she just had one a few days ago. they gave her some medicine bt it did not work and they are moving her to the vet hospital so she can have someone with her during the night. should I be worried, will she be ok?
Inconsistency in breed classification and naming among registries means that an individual animal may be considered different breeds by different registries (though not necessarily eligible for registry in them all, depending on its exact ancestry). For example, the TICA's Himalayan is considered a colorpoint variety of the Persian by the CFA, while the Javanese (or Colorpoint Longhair) is a color variation of the Balinese in the TICA and the CFA; both breeds are merged (along with the Colorpoint Shorthair) into a single "mega-breed", the Colourpoint, in the World Cat Federation (WCF), who have repurposed the name "Javanese" for the Oriental Longhair. Also, "Colo[u]rpoint Longhair" refers to multiple different breeds in some other registries. There are several examples of nomenclatural confusion of this sort. Furthermore, many geographical and cultural names for cat breeds are fanciful selections made by Western breeders to be "exotic"-sounding and bear no relationship to the actual origin of the breeds;[4] the Balinese, Javanese, and Himalayan are all examples of this trend.
The slight upturn to the corners of the mouth make Russian Blues appear to be forever smiling. Members of this breed are generally polite, quiet, and well-behaved, for cats. It’s quite easy to teach them to stay off counters and out of off-limit areas; usually a simple “No” will do. However, Russian Blues seem to think politeness should go both ways and take offense at being made to look silly. A dignified cat, Russian Blues can be trusted to know when you’re making fun of them—and they won’t soon forget this breach in manners, either.

We receive requests every week from people who are looking for some place to take their “pet” cat.  Each year we have to turn away more than 100 such “pets“.  These unwitting owners have discovered that all exotic cats, both male and female, neutered or not, spray and bite when they reach sexual maturity.  (They don’t just spray a little either.  We are talking about buckets of the foulest smelling urine, all over your house, your things and you. If you don’t believe me, watch this clip of a neutered lion HERE)  Moving them out to the yard means your neighbors will soon be complaining that your place smells like a zoo.   By the time they find us they have discovered that the zoos do not want their animals, that no one is willing to buy them and that they can’t even give them away.  Refuges are usually full to capacity and cannot take in another hungry mouth to feed.  All too often, these “pets” are turned out to fend for themselves, where they surely die of starvation or are euthanized.

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