The physical appearance of the Archangel is so appealing that you, family members and guests will be drawn to the feline right away. The silver-tinged blue coat, accompanied by intelligent, slightly sloped green eyes add elegance and ambiance to any room. Once you get to know your cat and the Foreign Blue accepts, then it becomes evident that they make the perfect pets. Their intelligent and playful nature will go a long way towards a fulfilling relationship in any household.

All big cat species spawn on grass blocks at light levels of 9 or more with at least 2 block space above. Some species can only spawn in certain biomes; leopards and panthers spawn in jungles, forests and their variants; lions and tigers spawn in plains and forests; and snow leopards spawn in cold biomes. Lions and tigers also spawn more frequently than panthers. There is a 1/20 chance of a white lion, lioness or tiger spawning, and a lower chance for a white cub to spawn.

The PIxiebob breed began as a result of natural mating. Carol Ann Brewer observed bob-tailed cats in the Cascade Mountains of Washington state. She adopted one of these cats in 1985, who then mated with a neighbor's cat. She obtained more of the "legend cats," bob-tailed local cats that somewhat resembled bobcats, and are thought to be results of natural matings between bobcats and domestic cats, although no proof exists. Pixiebobs are tall cats with back legs slightly longer than the front legs. They have thick double coats that may be short or long. Breed standards allow for up to seven toes in a PIxiebob, the only championship breed allowing for polydactly. Pixiebobs gained championship status with the TICA in 1998. Although Pixiebobs are often stone-faced like a wild cat, they are loyal and make good pets.
Anticoagulants (blood thinners) and antiaggregants (antiplatelet) – These drugs reduce the occurrence of blood clots forming. Anticoagulants work by delaying the clotting of blood; common medications include Warfarin and Heparin. Antiaggregants stop platelets from clumping together to form a plug. Aspirin and clopidogrel are two drugs in this category.
Thank you for your email. I'm glad that you have a scheduled appointment with Paige, as if the medications did not work, it deserves a second look. One thing that your veterinarian can do is to take an x-ray of her lungs and make sure that there is nothing to worry about there. If she isn't on heartworm prevention, a heartworm test might be a good idea as well. Without knowing the details of her situation, or being able to examine her, I can't comment more on what might be happening with her. I hope that she recovers well!
My wonderful kitty Dave is generally very healthy. He cuddles and plays all the time and is always by my side when I’m home. I’ve noticed this a few times but most recently a few days ago- he’ll be breathing very fast (60bpm) and shivering. He doesn’t try to hide and definitely wants to be held or cuddled but doesn’t want to move around. Last time it happened there was a bad thunderstorm and I wasn’t home for the worst part of it. Could he have just been scared? After a little while as the storm does down, he used his litter box and peed a lot, then pooped - also a lot. Buried it. Drank his water, ate some food and was back to purring and playing. I can’t remember if it had stormed the other times he’s acted like that with the rapid breathing and dilated glassy eyes, but i did notice that he’ll cuddle then use the box and feel better. He’s even cried before in his litter box, like it hurt to go poop. But I figured out that only happened when he ate fishy cat food so now he gets beef, chicken or turkey.
My cat is about 9 years old, and about two days ago his breathing started to become very rapid at about 60-80 breaths per minute. He is eating properly and acting normally and doesn't appear to be in pain. Is there any reason this could be as this hasn't happened to any of our previous cats. He is also very healthy and has only gone to the vets for mess once for a urine infection he always has the de wormer and the anti flea drops as well as his vaccines
Because breeders outcrossed the foundation jungle cats to mostly intelligent, outgoing breeds such as the Abyssinian and Oriental Shorthair, Chausies are intelligent, active, athletic cats. They are often very "busy" as kittens. As adults, they are quieter, but they still retain a playfulness and lifelong curiosity. Chausies do not like to be alone; they need to have other cats as companions or have human company most of the time. Chausies get along well with dogs, too, and will do fine if raised with a canine buddy. Additionally, Chausies form deep bonds with people. They are loyal, and may have difficulty adjusting if re-homed as adults.
There are many possible causes for a cat to feel lethargic with an increased respiratory rate which may include infections, gastrointestinal obstruction (increased breathing rate due to pain), anaemia (less red blood cells lead to an increase in respiration) among other causes; you should keep a close eye on Buddy, but it would be wise to visit your Veterinarian to help narrow in on a specific cause for the lethargy as there are many possible causes. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
The name "Cheetoh cat" probably brings up the image of the laid-back cartoon cheetah named Chester who advertises Cheetos. But it is also a fairly new breed of house cat. According to the International Cheetoh Breeders Association, the Cheetoh is an attempt to breed a cat that looks more like a wild cat than other breeds but is still a gentle house pet. Carol Drymon bred the first Cheetoh in 2001 by crossing a Bengal and an Ocicat. A Cheetoh is a vary large cat, with healthy males reaching 23 pounds. Such a large cat with leopard-like spots may scare strangers, but is quite tame and as safe around children as any other house cat. TICA considers the Cheetoh an experimental breed.
Hello. My cay spooky was hospitalized last night for suspected poisoning from bug spray. He was stabilized and spent the night with iv and vitamins, pain medication etc. Today at around 5 they released him to be watched at home and he seems much better although he seems to be having rapid breaths or a hard time breathing. I can hear it and he seems to be straining. Is this from all the medication or residual poison? will it pass?

Pleural effusion is an abnormal buildup of fluid up in the pleural cavity, the thin fluid-filled space that lies between the lungs and the chest wall. It is a symptom, with an underlying disorder causing this fluid to build up. The buildup of excess fluid leads to difficulty breathing, due to the inability of the lungs to fully expand. Causes include congestive heart failure, liver failure, fluid overload, blood clotting disorders (usually due to ingestion of rat poison), lung lobe torsion, pulmonary edema, and diaphragmatic hernia.


Without examining Tilly I cannot say for certain whether I would recommend euthanasia or not; but if she is struggling to breathe, seems in pain and your Veterinarian hasn’t recommended any surgical options (due to age or location of tumour) then you may want to think about euthanasia. It is a very difficult decision to make, but you need to look at Tilly’s quality of life and what the future holds for her. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
Chausies are bred to be medium to large in size, as compared to traditional domestic breeds.[5] Most Chausies are a little smaller than a male Maine Coon, for example, but larger than a Siamese. Adult Chausie males typically weigh 15 to 25 pounds.[6][7] Adult females are usually 15 to 20 pounds.[6] However, because Chausies are built for running and jumping, they are long-bodied and leggy with medium boning.[1] The torso is deep-chested with flat sides. The ears are broad, tall, and set high on the head, about two fingers apart. The cheekbones are striking—prominent, long, and angular—and the eyes are flattened on top and form a half oval below.
We receive requests every week from people who are looking for some place to take their “pet” cat.  Each year we have to turn away more than 100 such “pets“.  These unwitting owners have discovered that all exotic cats, both male and female, neutered or not, spray and bite when they reach sexual maturity.  (They don’t just spray a little either.  We are talking about buckets of the foulest smelling urine, all over your house, your things and you. If you don’t believe me, watch this clip of a neutered lion HERE)  Moving them out to the yard means your neighbors will soon be complaining that your place smells like a zoo.   By the time they find us they have discovered that the zoos do not want their animals, that no one is willing to buy them and that they can’t even give them away.  Refuges are usually full to capacity and cannot take in another hungry mouth to feed.  All too often, these “pets” are turned out to fend for themselves, where they surely die of starvation or are euthanized. 

I cannot think of a connection between the running after another cat and the symptoms that she is presenting with except possibly hypoglycemia (normally causes an increase in appetite) due to the blood glucose level being too low. I would suggest to rub a little corn syrup or honey on the gums to see if there is any improvement in Cupcake’s symptoms; ensure you keep Cupcake hydrated and visit your Veterinarian on Monday morning, if the symptoms increase in severity visit an Emergency Veterinarian. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
Getting a Russian Blue cat is no light matter if you’re serious about having one in the house. The best breeders are the ones that are the most established in their region; they won’t easily give you a Foreign Blue until they know that you’re a good candidate for it. For starters, it will be best to meet the kitten’s mom and dad and check for pedigree and overall health and well-being. Allow the breeder to ask you several questions to make sure you and the cat breed will be compatible living together.
There are many causes for a cat to have heavy breathing and without examining Jagger and auscultating his chest etc… I cannot say if there is a cause for concern or not; however heavy breathing may be caused by stress, pain, infections, obstructions, heart conditions among other causes. You should keep an eye on Jagger and visit your Veterinarian if you have any concerns or symptoms get worse. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

Chester was taken in last night for an abscess removal surgery on his neck. I got him back this morning and he is having trouble using his litter box. are there any suggestions to help him use it? also, the vet prescribed 2 antibiotics but no pain reliever for chester. he has a drain in his face and i could only imagine how painful it will be for the next few days until he gets it removed. i was told that chester was given a pain medication shot. how long is this supposed to last? it doesn't seem humane to let him go back home without the necessary pain relief medication. In addition, his breathing is quite fast. is that normal for a post abscess removal surgery?
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The Russian Blue’s elegant yet muscular body led one cat judge to proclaim him the “Doberman Pinscher of cats.” He has what’s called a semi-foreign body type, meaning it is moderate in shape, falling somewhere between the short, compact body of breeds such as Persians and the sleek angles of Oriental breeds such as the Siamese. The Cat Fanciers Association breed standard for the Russian Blue calls for him to have a head that is a smooth, medium-size wedge shape with a blunt muzzle. The broad wedge of the head and its flat skull are often described as cobra-like, although that is much too dangerous a description for this sweet-natured cat. Regal is perhaps a better term. Large ears are wide at the base with pointed tips, the interior lined with thin, translucent skin, and rounded vivid green eyes are set wide apart. A long, slender neck segues into high shoulder blades and a fine-boned body that is firm and muscular, covered with a short, thick double coat with a plush texture, often described as similar to that of a seal or beaver. If you were to run your fingers through a Russian Blue’s coat, the patterns they made would remain until they were petted smooth. The body is supported by long, fine-boned legs set on small, slightly rounded paws with pads that are a pinky lavender or mauve shade. The tail is long but in proportion to the body.
I was given an Enisyl-F Pump and have been administering that every 12 hours as instructed. The cause for my question, is two days later she has began breathing in the same manner that caused me to call the Vetenarian in the first place. It began for a good ten to twenty minutes and now she’s since stopped. I’m wondering is this normal or is it serious and if so should I take her back to the emergency Vet?
The Russian Blue stands out for his coat color. To the uninformed, he might look gray, but in cat show terms he is an even, bright blue with silver-tipped hairs that make him seem to glisten. Some Russian Blue kittens are born with “ghost stripes,” a reminder of the tabby gene that all cats carry, even if it isn’t expressed in their coat, but these generally fade, leaving the cat with the solid blue coat of maturity.
There are various causes for rapid breathing with pain being a common cause; infections, foreign bodies, heart conditions, allergies among other conditions may also cause rapid breathing. It may be worth trying to get Possum into the bathroom whilst you take a shower to see if the warm humid air helps to open her airway; otherwise we are a little bit stuck for a cause. If the cause was due to a blocked nose, your Veterinarian would have detected that on the physical examination. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

Sorry to hear your kitty is scratching like that! Does he show any signs of skin infections, fleas, mites, wounds from other cats? The cone could have stressed him further, yes, if he was scratching already because of tension/anxiety. Open sores can get infected, especially when left untreated and scratched further. We would recommend taking your kitty to the vet for a diagnosis. They will be able to provide you the advice and medication your kitty might need. Best wishes!

Two days is still early days for treatment but you should start seeing some improvement in the next day or so, I would say to give it the weekend and if there is no improvement in Jinx’s condition you should return to your Veterinarian on Monday for another examination. Improvement in an animal's condition, especially with antibiotics, can be delayed in most cases so unless your Veterinarian said specifically ‘you’ll see improvement over the next 24 hours’ or something similar you should give it three or four days at least. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
Thanks for reaching out to us. 🙂 We are no vets, but it sounds like your kitty is doing a-okay! If everything else is normal (eating, potty, sleep, appetite, etc.) then there isn’t much cause to worry. A healthy cat will take anywhere between 20 or 30 breaths per minute. But if you begin to observe a loss of appetite, blue gums, panting with the tongue out, and so on, then those are indicators of something more serious. We hope this helps. Best of luck and thanks again!

My cat isn't eating his treats which is VERY unusual for him. He's sitting like he's uncomfortable or ready to dash. He's also making a very weird, low noise almost like an attempt at a growl or purr but it isn't quite there. I also noticed he is breathing rather quickly. The article I read here said 20-30 breaths a minute and it looks like he's doing 40 in 30 seconds. His gums don't look pale or blue. Just the normal pink. His nose is still cold too. I haven't seen blood anywhere on him or in his litter box. It also seems like he hasn't vomited at all either.

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