My fiance said the he saw her eat this afternoon, so that is a relief. Her gums are pink (that's one of the first things I looked at on her and I should've told you that...but... this is my BABY CAT and she has me a little panicked!.. not like dealing with humans on the ambulance... she's innocent!) I do have access to oxygen... so we can make her an oxygen tent if it's necessary. Right now, she is getting up every couple of minutes and repositioning or pacing.. her respiration rate is around 50 right now... her belly almost looks like it's spasming and her heart rate is running between 80 and 90 everytime we take it... which is low... what do you suggest??????
Without examining Zuriel it is difficult to say what may be going on here, something certainly is not right if there is exercise intolerance from playing for a short period of time (for such a young cat); a loss of appetite is also concerning and may be attributable to numerous different conditions, however without examining Zuriel I cannot start to narrow in on a cause. You should visit your Veterinarian for a thorough examination to help narrow in on a specific cause. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
The AZA (American Zoological Association) zoos got together and took captive bred ocelots and released them in TX. The problem was that none of the cats in zoos had come from TX originally because the ocelots in TX had been extinct for a long time. Instead, they had all come from cats who were taken from the wilds of Central America long ago. In Central America ocelots eat snakes because most of them are non venomous. When the zoo bred ocelots were turned loose in TX they reverted to their ancient instincts in search of food and sought out snakes, but the TX snakes were mostly rattlesnakes and the ocelot program died out in a matter of weeks.
There is no approved adulticide (medications to kill adult heartworms) treatments for cats. Adulticides are themselves dangerous. A single dead worm can be fatal in cats as it can break away and cause a blockage of the pulmonary artery (pulmonary embolism). Heartworms in cats have a shorter lifespan than those in dogs; therefore it is preferable to manage symptoms and use a wait and see approach.
This is the most frequent email we get from exotic cat owners: “Hey, I’m really in over my head here!  I got this thing as an infant. I bottle-raised it. Everything was great. But I can no longer handle this cat. I cannot housebreak it. It tries to attack people. I just don’t know what to do with it.'” This was an actual quote about a Serval, but we have had hundreds of similar letters about every kind of exotic cat.

Age can have an effect on any animal and may cause a minor issue for a younger animal to be more severe in an older one; rapid breathing may be caused by a few different causes which may include pain, obstruction, heart failure among other issues. Given Zoey’s age, you should certainly visit your Veterinarian for an examination and a blood test to check her numbers. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

The litter box should always be clean at all times and placed in an optimal location. Scoop out the waste daily and change the litter box twice a week or more if you have the time. Place the litter box in a low foot traffic area and not anywhere near where you feed him. If you’re not too fond on litter boxes you can train your Foreign Blue to use a spare toilet, which is as good as any litter box in the market.


Care: Russian Blue cats are fairly easy to care for. Their coats simply need to be brushed once a week so that they stay can show off their beautiful blue color. They may require more brushing when they are going through a season of shedding. Trim their nails and clean their ears as needed to keep them looking lovely. And, as with any cat, it is important to regularly brush their teeth to prevent periodontal disease. If you are looking for a hypoallergenic cat then the Russian Blue cat is a great candidate. They produce less of the Fel D1 protein which is the true cause for your allergic reaction. There is no cat that is 100% allergy free so increasing the frequency of grooming and bathing your furry friend will also help.
There are several possible ways cats can develop pyothorax. In many cases, the initial cause may remain undetermined. Some causes include bite wounds, trauma, inhalation of an object such as a grass awn, bacteria ascending from the mouth, diffusion of bacterial infection, parasitic migration, perioperative aspiration, tumours, ruptured abscess and lung lobe torsion.
A cat’s resting respiratory rate shouldn’t go over 30 or 35 breaths per minute, anything above this should be checked by your Veterinarian. As a Nurse you will know that the respiratory rate may change in response to pain, oxygenation of blood, cardiac output as well as other factors; there are no specific diagnoses which list rapid breathing as their only symptom as other symptoms may not be observable including anaemia, heart conditions (possibly a murmur) etc… Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
Without examining Midnight it is difficult to give a diagnosis since lethargy and loss of appetite are vague symptoms common with many different conditions; infections, parasites (regardless of indoor or not), foreign objects, poisoning, spoiled food, injury (fell from somewhere) among many other causes may lead to these symptoms. You should ensure that Midnight is kept hydrated, but if there is no improvement you should visit your Veterinarian for an examination. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

So, my cat has been breathing fast for the last two days. She has been eating, drinking water and peeing/pooping normally as it seems... We had a big clean up in the house and all of us (humans and cats) were sneezing for a while so that is one of the possibilities, I guess...The other thing is that we had the sand of the sand box changed to one with a smell so maybe that was giving her allergies or something... These are two possibilities but I'm still worried. Do you think I should be concerned?


Hello, so after I had a party at my house a few days ago, my cat has been very weak, sleeping all the time, won't eat or drink as much as he used to, and breathing rapidly. I tried bringing him to a vet a couple of days ago and they said it was only stress due to the loud music and crowds from the party, and they told me to give him liquid food along with vitamins every hour for a few days. I've done that for a couple of days but it seems like my cat's breathing actually had gotten more shallow and heavy. I'm afraid that the vet misdiagnosed my cat (I don't trust the credibility of that vet, since they're not the one I'm used to go to), do you think there's anything more than just stress? Also if it helps, he's just gotten his first vaccination around last week. Thank you

I find it sad when people blame an animal behavior problems not on them selves when 99% are the fault of owners not understand the needs of the animals. Every single pet Ive placed has been great. Ive literally only had one issue after 8 years a lady moved, husband died and the was scared of her new home. That not because they cats a hybrid! Any cat would act unsure in a new home.
Big cats spawn on grass blocks at light levels of 9 or more in groups of up to 4. Some cats only spawn in certain biomes: leopards spawn in jungles, forests and forest variants; lions, panthers and tigers spawn in plains and forests; and snow leopards spawn in cold biomes. Lions and tigers also spawn more frequently than panthers. There is a 1/20 chance for a white lion, white lioness or white tiger to spawn.
Hi Claudia, thanks for your insights 🙂 Indeed, there’s no drug remedy for treating heartworm in cats, but it can be treated with thorough veterinary care. Cats are more resistant to heartworm than dogs, and signs often appear too late. Unfortunately heartworm is fatal even for cats who seem healthy on the outside:( Thanks for stopping by and reading FK.
My wonderful kitty Dave is generally very healthy. He cuddles and plays all the time and is always by my side when I’m home. I’ve noticed this a few times but most recently a few days ago- he’ll be breathing very fast (60bpm) and shivering. He doesn’t try to hide and definitely wants to be held or cuddled but doesn’t want to move around. Last time it happened there was a bad thunderstorm and I wasn’t home for the worst part of it. Could he have just been scared? After a little while as the storm does down, he used his litter box and peed a lot, then pooped - also a lot. Buried it. Drank his water, ate some food and was back to purring and playing. I can’t remember if it had stormed the other times he’s acted like that with the rapid breathing and dilated glassy eyes, but i did notice that he’ll cuddle then use the box and feel better. He’s even cried before in his litter box, like it hurt to go poop. But I figured out that only happened when he ate fishy cat food so now he gets beef, chicken or turkey.

The PIxiebob breed began as a result of natural mating. Carol Ann Brewer observed bob-tailed cats in the Cascade Mountains of Washington state. She adopted one of these cats in 1985, who then mated with a neighbor's cat. She obtained more of the "legend cats," bob-tailed local cats that somewhat resembled bobcats, and are thought to be results of natural matings between bobcats and domestic cats, although no proof exists. Pixiebobs are tall cats with back legs slightly longer than the front legs. They have thick double coats that may be short or long. Breed standards allow for up to seven toes in a PIxiebob, the only championship breed allowing for polydactly. Pixiebobs gained championship status with the TICA in 1998. Although Pixiebobs are often stone-faced like a wild cat, they are loyal and make good pets.
I took my senior cat Butters to the vets just a few weeks ago and the vet did just a physical exam. Said he was very healthy for a senior and looked great. Just two weeks before the appointment I had noticed he put on weight out of no where.. so since the visit I have noticed that he’s breathing very heavily and quickly and it shows in his abdominal. No panting though. I also noticed that he is purring more than usual. He was always did purr as he’s a loving and content boy, but I’ve noticed it even when I am not giving him affection and he is sitting next to me. Should I be worried at all?
My cat is about 9 years old, and about two days ago his breathing started to become very rapid at about 60-80 breaths per minute. He is eating properly and acting normally and doesn't appear to be in pain. Is there any reason this could be as this hasn't happened to any of our previous cats. He is also very healthy and has only gone to the vets for mess once for a urine infection he always has the de wormer and the anti flea drops as well as his vaccines
Generally a respiratory rate over 40 breaths per minute is considered worrying; however an increased respiratory rate is a symptom common with many different conditions including pain, heart disease, lung disorders, fluid in the chest or abdomen, poisoning among many other conditions. Monitor Ginger for the time being and visit your Veterinarian if there is no improvement or you’re generally concerned. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
The reserved nature of the Foreign Blue means that strangers will have to acquaint themselves first before the cat can play with them. Guests will be more than likely regarded coolly and at a safe distance, with the cat not presenting himself until after a while. You may see these cats up high and perched on their safe spot, casually watching as the scene unfolds before deciding to jump in.
Points or Pointed Markings: "Points," or darker shades of the body color, generally include the ears, muzzle, tail, and feet of the cat. The original pointed cat was the Siamese, and many years later, the Himalayan was developed by crossing Siamese with Persian cats. Many other breeds of pointed cats are now accepted by cat registries, including Ragdoll, Ragamuffin, Birman, Exotic, Balinese, and Javanese. Breed registries disallow pointed patterns in most other breeds. Many mixed breed cats display these distinctive points, which may be found in various colors.
Standard tests include a complete blood count, biochemical profile, and urine analysis. These will help your veterinarian to determine if your cat has an infection or a low red blood cell count. They will also show whether your cat's internal organs are functioning normally. Your veterinarian will also draw a sample of blood to test the amount of oxygen and carbon dioxide in your cat's blood. This will help to determine how severe your cat's breathing difficulty is and whether the problem is in the lungs or somewhere else in the chest. Your veterinarian may also draw blood for a heartworm test. Other diagnostic tools that may be used are X-ray and ultrasound images of the chest, both to examine for an enlarged heart that can lead to heart failure, and to see if the lungs appear normal. The internal structure of the abdomen may also be examined using this method. If there appears to be an accumulation of fluid in the chest, lungs or belly, some of that fluid will be drawn off for analysis.
The Russian blue is a sweet-tempered, loyal cat who will follow her owner everywhere, so don't be surprised if she greets you at the front door! While she has a tendency to attach to one pet parent in particular, she demonstrates affection with her whole family and demands it in return. It's said that Russian blues train their owners rather than the owners training them, a legend that's been proven true time and again.
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