My cat developed rapid labored respirations a week ago, the vet diagnosed lung cancer and he also had bladder infection. On xray he had consolidated whitish area with scattered crystal like areas. He was given antibiotics for infection and a steroid injection the vet said to temporary help with the breathing but he said my pet did not have long to live. He is breathing less labored and his rate fluctuates between 60-80/min. question is could this be something else instead of cancer-fungal, parasite? I do feed stray cats and even though he is mainly indoor cat I do take him out when I'm outside and he has gone under shrubs and maybe has sniffed something?

There are many different causes for rapid breathing in cats which may include pain, respiratory infection, heart failure among other causes. Without an examination and thorough auscultation of the chest, I cannot say what the cause is or the best course of treatment; anytime resting respiratory rate is over 40 breaths per minute, you should visit your Veterinarian as soon as possible. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

You should keep an eye on the kitten for now and ensure that he remains hydrated; rapid breathing may be attributable to numerous causes but shouldn’t be an issue unless he is in distress. See how he is over the next day or two, but if you don’t see any improvement you should visit your Veterinarian for another examination. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM


What's wrong with my poor gravy? My cat Gravy has become extremely affectionate today and has followed me outside 3x, where he never ever goes! He's following me like a shadow and meowing at me more than normal. He doesn't seem to be in any pain, but his breathing and change of demeanor have me concerned. He's breathing fairly rapidly thru his nose, and he is moving his tail a lot also acting maybe as if he is worried?
Thank you for your email. Since Tortie was just seen by your veterinarian and was deemed healthy, her periodic bouts of rapid breathing may be normal, and may follow bouts of exertion or anxiety. If the periods that she is breathing rapidly become more frequent, or more severe, it would be a good idea to have her seen by your veterinarian and examined to make sure that she is okay. It might be helpful to video the episode, since she doesn't seem to breathe that way when she is at an appointment. I hope that she is okay!
Thank you for your email. Without examining Missy, I can't comment on what might be going on. She may just be a skittish cat, given all of the change that has gone on in her life recently. IF she is eating and drinking normally, and seems healthy otherwise, she may be okay. If she seems to be having breathing problems. it would be best to have her seen by your veterinarian, and they will be able to determine if she is normal, or has a problem. It is nice of you to help this cat when she needs it. I hope that she is okay.
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If your cat does appear to have a heart problem, your veterinarian may also order an ECG (electrocardiogram) to measure the rhythm and electrical activity of the heart, both of which determine the heart's ability to operate normally. If your cat's problem is in its nose or airways, a small camera called an endoscope may be used to get a closer look at these areas. These procedures are known as rhinoscopy and bronchoscopy, respectively. While your veterinarian is examining your cat with the endoscope, samples of fluid and cells may be taken for biopsic analysis.
Also known as dirofilariasis, heartworm disease (HW) is a serious parasitic infection caused by the nematode Dirofilaria immitis which lives in the pulmonary arteries, lungs, and hearts of cats. Heartworms are a type of roundworm, with adult heartworms reaching a length of 12 to 30 cm. Microfilaria (baby heartworms) are present in the blood of an infected animal (in most cases, a dog), when a female mosquito feeds on the blood, microfilaria are also ingested, once, inside the gut of the mosquito, they undergo further development before migrating to the labium (a part of the mouth) of the mosquito. When the infected mosquito feeds on another host (in this case, your cat), the larvae move from the mouthpart and onto the skin of the cat (or dog), from there, they enter the bloodstream via the bite wound left behind by the mosquito.
My fiance said the he saw her eat this afternoon, so that is a relief. Her gums are pink (that's one of the first things I looked at on her and I should've told you that...but... this is my BABY CAT and she has me a little panicked!.. not like dealing with humans on the ambulance... she's innocent!) I do have access to oxygen... so we can make her an oxygen tent if it's necessary. Right now, she is getting up every couple of minutes and repositioning or pacing.. her respiration rate is around 50 right now... her belly almost looks like it's spasming and her heart rate is running between 80 and 90 everytime we take it... which is low... what do you suggest??????
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