Grooming the Archangel Blue is easier as compared to other short-haired varieties. The dense, silky coat won’t shed as much and owners can enjoy the plush feel of the Foreign Blue. This breed is generally easy to maintain in terms of grooming and health. You will need to prepare several essentials, such as a cat-safe toothpaste, a toothbrush and other creature comforts. These items are available to purchase online or at the local pet store. For brushing the coat, you’ll need a medium toothed comb to keep the coat luxurious and smooth.
Thoracic drainage tubes to remove fluids from the pleural cavity. Local anesthesia and IV sedation are administered to keep your cat comfortable during this procedure. Tubes will be flushed several times a day with 0.9% saline or lactated Ringers solution warmed to body temperature to wash the chest cavity (pleural lavage). Tubes will need to remain in place for between 4-6 days.
Thank you for your email. I do think that there might be more going on than stress, and kittens are prone to infectious diseases. If you don't trust that veterinarian that you saw, it would be a good idea to find a second opinion, even if you have to travel a bit to do so, as he could have a problem that needs to be treated. You can also call your veterinarian, let them know that he isn't getting better, and see if they have any other recommendations for him.

Without examining Luna it is difficult to weigh in on her conditions, the rapid breathing is concerning and is possibly due to anaemia if her gums are pale; blood counts would be a logical test to run if the gums are pale so that we would know if there really is a decrease in red blood cells as well as whether or not there is an increase in white blood cells or other tell tale signs. I understand that you’ve spent a lot already, but without examining Luna I cannot say for certain what the cause is, I would recommend visiting another clinic or a charity clinic for a better look at Luna’s symptoms. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM


The Russian Blue can spend hours amusing itself and does not mind an awful lot if it is left at home alone for the day, but it will be very happy to see you when you do arrive. This cat makes for an excellent companion, constantly following its owners about, and generally preferring one human above all others in the family. It should be added that the Russian Blue gets along with most everyone, including children. Their love of human company extends to impishly clowning to help calm a crying baby, and showing sympathy when their people get the blues by patting the face of the person.
The Russian blue is a sweet-tempered, loyal cat who will follow her owner everywhere, so don't be surprised if she greets you at the front door! While she has a tendency to attach to one pet parent in particular, she demonstrates affection with her whole family and demands it in return. It's said that Russian blues train their owners rather than the owners training them, a legend that's been proven true time and again.
My cat, Arwen, just came out to the living room limping badly with her front right leg kinda knuckling over. The leg and paw is cool to the touch in comparison to the rest of her body and her shoulder blade is just flat. I pinched her toes a little and there was no reaction. She's also breathing kind of shallow and fast with it seems like she's breathing from her stomach not her chest. She is crying a little bit but not when we touch the leg, onky when she tries to move around while laying down.
There are various causes for respiratory symptoms in cats and without examining Nala or seeing an episode it is difficult to give you a definitive ‘that’s normal’ or not; if Nala is in respiratory difficulty you should return to a Veterinarian for an examination to be on the safe side. Conditions like laryngeal paralysis may cause intermittent respiratory difficulty but I cannot say with any certainty. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

Lethargy and increased respiratory rate are not specific symptoms as they are shared with many conditions; however I’m concerned that they are a common sign that an animal is in pain, but without examining Marilyn I cannot say whether she is in pain or there is another cause for the symptoms. You should visit your Veterinarian for an examination to be on the safe side especially if this has been going on for a day or more. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
Conservation is a very complex issue and captive settings cannot duplicate it, so the important work of saving entire eco systems is not taught and not done in a captive setting. What’s worse is that lip service is paid to these worthy objectives and when you pay to see captive wildlife you walk away thinking you did something good when in fact you contributed to the problem. You paid to see a cat in a cage. You made sure that industry continues to breed and exploit more cats. You did not pay to save the wild and all of the wonderous and magnifient creatures who call it home. You put another nail in the coffin for the planet.
Without an examination and possibly a blood test, it is difficult to say what the cause for Buddy’s symptoms are; however eclampsia is a possible cause and would require immediate attention from a Veterinarian if this is the case. I am not sure about veterinary care in Jordan but I know that there is a veterinary school in Al Ramtha, Irbid, Jordan if that is close to you if you require veterinary care. https://wagwalking.com/cat/condition/eclampsia- www.just.edu.jo/FacultiesandDepartments/FacultyOfVeterinaryMedicine/Pages/Default.aspx
If Squeakers is acting normally otherwise and doesn't seem to be having any respiratory distress, this may just be normal for her. If she hasn't had a checkup in a while, it would be a good idea to have her checked out, regardless, as a veterinarian can listen to her heart and lungs, and assess her general health and whether this breathing pattern is normal, or a potential problem. I hope that all goes well for her!
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