Care: Russian Blue cats are fairly easy to care for. Their coats simply need to be brushed once a week so that they stay can show off their beautiful blue color. They may require more brushing when they are going through a season of shedding. Trim their nails and clean their ears as needed to keep them looking lovely. And, as with any cat, it is important to regularly brush their teeth to prevent periodontal disease. If you are looking for a hypoallergenic cat then the Russian Blue cat is a great candidate. They produce less of the Fel D1 protein which is the true cause for your allergic reaction. There is no cat that is 100% allergy free so increasing the frequency of grooming and bathing your furry friend will also help.	

These cats have some serious staying power. Hailing from Siberia, this breed was first referenced all the way back in 1000 A.D., according to TICA. Powerful, intelligent and entertaining best describe the Siberian, which frequently takes problem-solving (like opening doors) into their own paws. Their semi-long coat is thick in the winter to withstand the elements and becomes shorter and lighter in the warmer months.
My kitten Rupert is only 7 weeks old and he started breathing rapidly the night before. At times he groans and breathes with his mouth open. He feels and sounds most uncomfortable when he is being held, but still has discomfort if laying down for a long time. I'm not sure if he has a cold, or if its something wrong with his lungs? He had just been in the emergency just 2 days ago for low blood sugar, but he wasn't doing this at that time. What do I do?
When my kitten is sleeping he breathes very quickly. He doesn’t do it once in while, he does it every single time and throughout the whole time he’s sleeping. I read online that to calculate their breathing, I should count how many times they breathe within a 15 second period and multiply it by 4. It also said they’re normal breathing rate should be around 25-30 and my kitten’s is 92. He’s seems pretty healthy, he eats he’s food, he’s drinking his water, he’s very active so I’m very confused about this.

According to a report in a 1978 edition of the British tabloid paper “Sun”, a “pantig” (panther-tiger hybrid) was born at Southam Zoo, a private zoo located on Warwickshire farm (Southam is between Royal Leamington Spa and Daventry). The purported pantig was the result of a mating between a male black leopard and a tigress and was fostered by a Dachshund. The cub’s background colour was the typical yellow-brown shade of normal leopards. Unlike earlier attempts at captive-breeding leopard-tiger hybrids, this purported hybrid evidently survived into adulthood. Eventually, the Southam Zoo pantig was sold to an American zoo. Although this account is currently not scientifically authenticated, it indicates that the leopard’s recessive melanism gene is also recessive to the tiger’s normal tawny color.


Thoracic drainage tubes to remove fluids from the pleural cavity. Local anesthesia and IV sedation are administered to keep your cat comfortable during this procedure. Tubes will be flushed several times a day with 0.9% saline or lactated Ringers solution warmed to body temperature to wash the chest cavity (pleural lavage). Tubes will need to remain in place for between 4-6 days.
Hybrids have always been popular. They make people feel connected with the wilderness outside. We can’t all own lions and tigers (nor should we), but so many people want little felines that resemble their larger, exotic cousins. Some breeders have begun breeding smaller wild species with domestic cats to create beautiful hybrids that are safe for the average cat owner to live with. Although hybrids are still controversial, there is no denying how unique and beautiful they are. Take a look at the most popular hybrids below.
Anemia is a condition characterised by a reduced number of red blood (also known as erythrocytes) cells in the blood. Is not a disease in itself but a symptom of an underlying condition. It can be due to the premature destruction of the red blood cells, decreased production (due to cancers, kidney disease, certain infections or drugs), blood loss, tumours, blood clotting disorders and parasites such as fleas and hookworm.
There are many possible causes for rapid breathing in cats which may include allergies or irritation; however it may also be due to more serious conditions including infections, heart failure, anaemia among other causes. Without examining Lexa I cannot say what the specific cause is, you should visit your Veterinarian if Lexa’s resting respiratory rate is above 40 breaths per minute to determine the cause and treat accordingly. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
Hello there! My girlfriend and I have an exclusively outdoor cat who has recently shown some worrisome behavior. Typically, Simba is very independent. Only allows some human interaction when we feed him, and even then it's more like we have to sneak a pet here and there. About three days ago I came home and noticed his breathing was fairly rapid. I thought maybe he just came to our porch after some activity, so I mentioned it to my girlfriend in passing. Yesterday she called me at work worried. Simba was letting her pet him and even came into our garage (which is basically set up like a living room. There's a heater, ac unit, tv, carpets, etc.) It's very home-y. Anyway, he's been in the garage the past two nights since its been in the thirties at night time. He lays very still, breathes very rapid and heavy. I can hear, what I think is congestion as he breathes. He hasn't eaten or drank much. The only thing I have gotten to eat are a few cat treats. I read online we could give him a small dosage of benedryl. But I don't want to give him anything that would essentially hurt him. He also has random asthma like episodes. Wheezing and coughing with his mouth closed. He meows when we talk to him, or look at him. Part of me feels like he's asking for help! Unsure if whatever he has is life threatening or just a little kitty cold.

If Chester’s respiratory rate is over 100 breaths per minute you should visit your Veterinarian immediate for an examination since this is well over physiological range; infections, anaemia, allergies, congenital anomalies, foreign objects, fluid, parasites among other causes may be the underlying cause. I cannot give you any at home advice in a case this severe except to visit a Veterinarian for a thorough examination. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM 

Thank you for your email. Since Tortie was just seen by your veterinarian and was deemed healthy, her periodic bouts of rapid breathing may be normal, and may follow bouts of exertion or anxiety. If the periods that she is breathing rapidly become more frequent, or more severe, it would be a good idea to have her seen by your veterinarian and examined to make sure that she is okay. It might be helpful to video the episode, since she doesn't seem to breathe that way when she is at an appointment. I hope that she is okay!
Black ticked tabby Chausies have black ticking, black stripes on the inside of the upper legs and to a lesser extent on the outside, black rings on the tail, a black tail tip, and black tabby markings around the eyes. They are also known as brown ticked tabbies because, although the markings are black, the background color is brownish. The background color can vary in hue across a large range. While Chausie breeders try to avoid producing the very reddish brown background color seen in the Abyssinian breed, they do produce everything else in the range. Background color may be reddish gold, it may be a light golden brown, warm beige, cold beige, and even a very cool light gray with just a hint of brown in it. The latter is a very wild looking background color. Random polygenes influence the background color. Every time a black ticked tabby kitten is born, breeders start guessing what the background color will be. But no one really knows until the cat matures.
About a month ago my 8 month old cat started panting after playing. I have also noticed for some time that her breathing is quite rapid even when sleeping. I called the vet and he suggested I take her for a check up. Everything seemed fine when the vet visited her but to be sure he told me to take her for a chest x-ray and blood test. I got the results yesterday and still no cause has been found to explain her breathing. All the tests were normal. The vet says he cannot rule out a heart problem and he suggests taking her to a cardiologist for a heart ultrasound. Apart from the panting (which is not every time she exercises but just occasionally) and rapid breathing (which I see every day) she seems a very health and active cat. I am not sure how concerned I should be about this. Perhaps it is just due to the heat. But I would not want to overlook a more serious underlying cause. I would not want to put her through any more distress by taking her a long way to a cardiologist. I would be grateful for any advice.
The physical appearance of the Archangel is so appealing that you, family members and guests will be drawn to the feline right away. The silver-tinged blue coat, accompanied by intelligent, slightly sloped green eyes add elegance and ambiance to any room. Once you get to know your cat and the Foreign Blue accepts, then it becomes evident that they make the perfect pets. Their intelligent and playful nature will go a long way towards a fulfilling relationship in any household.
Regardless, you should visit your Veterinarian or an Emergency Veterinarian to examine Gizmo since she should be eating and drinking normally after this routine surgery and the ‘seizure like’ activity is also concerning; the moderate increase in respiration may be due to discomfort from surgery or due to something more serious. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

Sorry to hear your kitty is scratching like that! Does he show any signs of skin infections, fleas, mites, wounds from other cats? The cone could have stressed him further, yes, if he was scratching already because of tension/anxiety. Open sores can get infected, especially when left untreated and scratched further. We would recommend taking your kitty to the vet for a diagnosis. They will be able to provide you the advice and medication your kitty might need. Best wishes!
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