We receive requests every week from people who are looking for some place to take their “pet” cat.  Each year we have to turn away more than 100 such “pets“.  These unwitting owners have discovered that all exotic cats, both male and female, neutered or not, spray and bite when they reach sexual maturity.  (They don’t just spray a little either.  We are talking about buckets of the foulest smelling urine, all over your house, your things and you. If you don’t believe me, watch this clip of a neutered lion HERE)  Moving them out to the yard means your neighbors will soon be complaining that your place smells like a zoo.   By the time they find us they have discovered that the zoos do not want their animals, that no one is willing to buy them and that they can’t even give them away.  Refuges are usually full to capacity and cannot take in another hungry mouth to feed.  All too often, these “pets” are turned out to fend for themselves, where they surely die of starvation or are euthanized.

Unlike horses, the breeding pair does not need to be kept away from other big cats, but they do need to be kept close in order to breed, therefore it is recommended to place them in a fenced area. Winged big cats, ghosts and hybrids are sterile and cannot be bred, and snow leopards, white lions and white lionesses cannot breed with other big cat species.
He purrs all the time and loves to play. His lips and nose are a nice pink as well as his tongue. His inner eyelids are fine. His eyes are only wide when he's ready to play. When he sleeps in a certain position, his heart rate is higher than normal, but when he sleeps in a different position, he breathes fast, over 40 breaths per minute. When I feel his heart, it's always beating fast but that's because he is very active and loves to play. When he sleeps in a different position, usually curled up, his breathing and heart rate are fine. Usually the rapid breathing is when his head is back, but he quickly wakes up to change position to become more comfortable. He normally plays for an hour or so, becomes tired, then goes to sleep.
As the name suggests, this breed is believed to have originated in Russia. It is widely believed that British sailors, fascinated by this breed of cat, brought them home from the White Sea port town of Archangel (Arkhangelsk) in northern Russia. The presence of a warm, thick coat suggests that they were long accustomed to surviving in a cold climate. As mentioned earlier in this article, there has been some suggestion that the Russian Blue lived in the wild and was hunted for its fur. Whether these stories are true or not remains pure speculation.
The physical appearance of the Archangel is so appealing that you, family members and guests will be drawn to the feline right away. The silver-tinged blue coat, accompanied by intelligent, slightly sloped green eyes add elegance and ambiance to any room. Once you get to know your cat and the Foreign Blue accepts, then it becomes evident that they make the perfect pets. Their intelligent and playful nature will go a long way towards a fulfilling relationship in any household.
If you’re her favorite human, be ready for nonstop love, because she is all about you, you and more you. Feeling out of sorts? She’ll stick by your side, working her healing abilities on you until you’re up and at ’em again! Prepping dinner? She’ll chill by your side, acting as taste tester. Binge-watching a new TV show? She’ll curl up by your side — just have a comb handy, as she loves being brushed while watching the tube!
My about 8 or 9 year old cat started breathing heavily today after me and friend did some major cleaning. She was diagnosed with feline leukemia when we took her to the vet for the first time after we got her when she was about 5 months to a year as a stray. It's never bothered her at all though, she's never had an issue. She's also never breathed like this before. So I didn't know if it was because all of the dust. The dust was so bad that we had masks while we cleaned. We just thought it was the dust in the air and I've opened up all the windows to air everything out. It was also 70 something degrees outside today and she does go in and out of the house.Other than her breathing she is eating, drinking and acting completely normal. So I was just going to take her to the vet if she was still breathing like this tomorrow, but the more I search online the more nervous I get that it's not just the dust and she may have a serious issue going on.
Getting a Russian Blue cat is no light matter if you’re serious about having one in the house. The best breeders are the ones that are the most established in their region; they won’t easily give you a Foreign Blue until they know that you’re a good candidate for it. For starters, it will be best to meet the kitten’s mom and dad and check for pedigree and overall health and well-being. Allow the breeder to ask you several questions to make sure you and the cat breed will be compatible living together.

Pyothorax (pleural empyema) is the presence of pus in the pleural space in the chest cavity, the thin, fluid-filled space that lies between the lungs and the chest wall. Any pathogenic organism can cause pyothorax including fungal, viral, bacterial or protozoal; however, a bacterial infection is by far the most common pathogen. The collection of pus is due to dead white blood cells and dead bacteria. Common bacteria involved in pyothorax include Pasteurella spp (the most common), Nocardia spp,  Streptococcus spp, Clostridium spp, Proteus spp, Bacteroides spp and Mycoplasma spp.

Getting a Russian Blue cat is no light matter if you’re serious about having one in the house. The best breeders are the ones that are the most established in their region; they won’t easily give you a Foreign Blue until they know that you’re a good candidate for it. For starters, it will be best to meet the kitten’s mom and dad and check for pedigree and overall health and well-being. Allow the breeder to ask you several questions to make sure you and the cat breed will be compatible living together.
When my kitten is sleeping he breathes very quickly. He doesn’t do it once in while, he does it every single time and throughout the whole time he’s sleeping. I read online that to calculate their breathing, I should count how many times they breathe within a 15 second period and multiply it by 4. It also said they’re normal breathing rate should be around 25-30 and my kitten’s is 92. He’s seems pretty healthy, he eats he’s food, he’s drinking his water, he’s very active so I’m very confused about this.
Kokwa may be breathing fast due to stress, pain, respiratory infection, heart conditions, anaemia (check gums), poisoning among other causes; without examining Kokwa and listening to the heart and lungs I cannot say specifically what may be wrong. You should keep a close eye on Kokwa and if the breathing doesn’t improve you should visit your Veterinarian in the morning or if you see he is in respiratory distress or his gums are white visit an Emergency Veterinarian immediately. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
Historians and cat lovers in Scandinavia and England worked tirelessly to map out a bloodline foundation for the cat breed. Records show that the first Archangel Blue appeared in 1875 to compete against similar blue breeds at the London Crystal Palace. One newspaper said that the Archangel was “particularly furry”, “very handsome” and “has similarities to that of the wild grey rabbit”. Before long, word was spreading around about the Russian Blue. 

Currently, most authentic Chausies produced are late generation cats with fully domestic temperaments. Their TICA registration certificates will usually indicate that they are "C" generation or "SBT," which nearly always means they are four generations or more beyond the jungle cat (F. chaus). In cases where they are "A" or "B" generation, it is usually because they have been recently outcrossed to another domestic breed to improve specific cosmetic traits, but the cats are nonetheless more than four generations beyond the handful of nondomestic ancestors.
Black grizzled tabbies are unique to the Chausie breed among domestic cats. The grizzled pattern comes from the jungle cat; it is never found in domestic cats unless they have F. chaus ancestors.[8] The kittens are often born completely black, although occasionally they may have a bit of light colored fur on the chin or neck at birth. As the kittens get older, they begin to look more and more like tabbies. However, they are tabbies with black on black markings. That is, the background color is a sort of dark brownish black, and the markings, such as the mid-line stripe on the spine, are pure black. In addition, alternating bands of off-white appear on individual hairs in the background color. The bands are along the middle of each hair. The root of each hair is mousie gray, while the tip of each hair is black. The off-white banding or "ticking" usually appears first on the neck, chin, and belly, as well as the insides of the ears. Later, the grizzling will often extend up the sides from belly to almost the spine. In the most heavily grizzled cats, the grizzling extends over the back of the neck, on the face, and even on the legs and tail. Usually the grizzling is complete by age 3 years. The effect in the best cats is spectacular. Grizzling does have a wide range of expression, however, and some cats never have more than a few banded hairs in the ears or in one spot on the belly, occasionally not even that.
This is the most frequent email we get from exotic cat owners: “Hey, I’m really in over my head here!  I got this thing as an infant. I bottle-raised it. Everything was great. But I can no longer handle this cat. I cannot housebreak it. It tries to attack people. I just don’t know what to do with it.'” This was an actual quote about a Serval, but we have had hundreds of similar letters about every kind of exotic cat.
My 2 year old female (not spayed) cat has had strange breathing since she was a kitten (a few month old) it started when I went on holiday and left her at home with my partner. When she’s active or sleeping her breathing is normal but it’s when she’s just resting and especially purring her breathing is quite fast and he stomach is visablly moving quickly. She is healthy and has never had any accidents or anything traumatic. She drinks well, goes to the toilet fine, she’s a fussy eater but does eat (so not really worrying) she’s very active, love she climbing and playing and running around. Her breathing is just really unusual when she’s resting. It’s like her whole body is moving with her breaths. In my opinion it’s like her little lungs are having to work hard to get the oxygen in however she doesn’t show any signs or symptoms of being unwell.
My cat Nala is just over a year old, two nights ago she expierienced some rapid breathing. It sounded as though she had a stuffy nose. She sounded very congested. She wasn’t panting with her mouth open but nether the less I began to worry and called an emergency 24hr Vetenarian. They told me to bring her in, so upon arriving and waiting to see a vet finally we were told that she “seemed bright and happy, her lungs sounded clear but she did have a little bit of referred upper respiratory noise”.
Sharleen ear temperature change hot to cold 4 times overnight. Sound stuffy when purr. Breath heavily and urinate lots and often last few weeks. Took her to the vet for blood work and check up today. She seem worse and in pain. Lower lip is now swollen, right front leg a little limping. Not active all afternoon. Night fall and she seem restless. What can I do to ease her pain while waiting for blood work result?
Thank you for your email. Without examining her or knowing more about her condition and history, I can't determine what might be going on with Mochi, but those are signs that she needs to see a veterinarian as soon as possible, as they will be able to examine her, decide what tests or treatments might be necessary, and treat her so that she feels better. I hope that all goes well for her.
My fiance said the he saw her eat this afternoon, so that is a relief. Her gums are pink (that's one of the first things I looked at on her and I should've told you that...but... this is my BABY CAT and she has me a little panicked!.. not like dealing with humans on the ambulance... she's innocent!) I do have access to oxygen... so we can make her an oxygen tent if it's necessary. Right now, she is getting up every couple of minutes and repositioning or pacing.. her respiration rate is around 50 right now... her belly almost looks like it's spasming and her heart rate is running between 80 and 90 everytime we take it... which is low... what do you suggest??????
Pleural effusion is an abnormal buildup of fluid up in the pleural cavity, the thin fluid-filled space that lies between the lungs and the chest wall. It is a symptom, with an underlying disorder causing this fluid to build up. The buildup of excess fluid leads to difficulty breathing, due to the inability of the lungs to fully expand. Causes include congestive heart failure, liver failure, fluid overload, blood clotting disorders (usually due to ingestion of rat poison), lung lobe torsion, pulmonary edema, and diaphragmatic hernia.
My two year old shorthair was a rescue she was found abandoned in an apartment with her kitten just one. She started eating litter and hiding first in the litter box for a week or so until I found her and I was able to get her to stop by taking the kids off all litter boxes she moved to my hamper then she started urinating outside the box on my wife’s side of the room or in the closet on it near my wife’s shoes so I took her to the vet. I paid a lot of money for her to literally look at Luna and ask about symptoms then diagnosed her with a UTI without blood work. She sent us home with Clavamax and Meloxicam for 7 days but the Clavamax ended up only being 12.5 doses not 14. We were told by the vet it could also be stress because we got a new cat 3 weeks earlier. She said buy a diffuser with pheromones and see if that works. I also bought her a 6’ tall tree and She improved but was gaining weight slowly then a month and half later she got the same hiding and weight loss and urinating outside the box issue again. Her weight fell off this time and would only use the litter box if I took her in there or she had to poop. She wouldn’t urinate in it. So I moved it to the room with her so she didn’t have to go so far. She drinks lots of water not excessive she likes sitting in her litter box so I made a large patch of cat grass in my house in her room. She loves laying in the grass. She was getting along with the new cat fine before this started for two weeks. But it cleared up and came back after only 45 days. She WILL NOT sit in my living room or in my recliner at all. I thought it was stress for sure. So I took her back to vet and demanded blood work. She was dropped off I came to get her and she said all blood was negative nothing really irregular she then proceeds to tell me the only thing she can think of is FIP. Then I ask how was her iron and she said we didn’t do CBC only chemistry to check internal organs so I’m crying and confused ???? My cat is breathing 40 breaths per minute she eats she uses box if it’s where she can see it. She eats litter. How can she tell me I should euthanize if she didn’t rule out all other issues?? She wanted me to right then. It’s a large corporate vet. So I contacted customer care they sent her the email and told her to contact me. So I check her gums they are pale light pink/whiteish and the other symptoms the scared/hiding thing. I have epilepsy and had a bad seizure the two weeks before she got sick. Could I have had one bad enough it stressed her? That’s why she won’t go in my chair and it caused her to stop eating and she became anemic? The blood work with the pet care plan I have was $65 and the meds were $52. I demanded all blood work be done to get an answer and they only did chemistry for organ function and when I’m told she’s ready to go I get there and after I’m told she’s dying I’m told we can do CBC if she survives past the medication days. She didn’t do her shots because it was a waste if I was going to euthanize so she made up her mind I would before seeing me about it. I’m not unless she gets worse. 6 days of meds and she’s “better” I can see a slight change and she’s gained weight small amount but some. She was 8lb and dropped to 6.3 then 4.7 in 3 weeks if not faster. Is it possible she’s anemic and or other nutrient deficient and not at all sick with FIP. Oh yeah no vomit no diarrhea she has daily stool that’s the right texture. Please help. I’m a disabled Iraq vet and she’s the only daytime friend I have she saved me two years ago. My other cats are special but we have a special bond. I can’t watch her die but I can’t put her down not being postitive that we fought for her.
The litter box should always be clean at all times and placed in an optimal location. Scoop out the waste daily and change the litter box twice a week or more if you have the time. Place the litter box in a low foot traffic area and not anywhere near where you feed him. If you’re not too fond on litter boxes you can train your Foreign Blue to use a spare toilet, which is as good as any litter box in the market.
Getting a Russian Blue cat is no light matter if you’re serious about having one in the house. The best breeders are the ones that are the most established in their region; they won’t easily give you a Foreign Blue until they know that you’re a good candidate for it. For starters, it will be best to meet the kitten’s mom and dad and check for pedigree and overall health and well-being. Allow the breeder to ask you several questions to make sure you and the cat breed will be compatible living together.
The Bengal cat is a considerably older breed than the others in this list, but as a breed derived from a wild cat hybrid, it is worth a look. The Bengal breed, which developed from a cross between a domestic cat and an Asian leopard Cat, is also the starting point for other breeds in this list. There have been stories of naturally occurring crossbreeds in Asia from way back, with the oldest confirmed case in 1934. The breed as we know it began with geneticist Jean Sugden-Mills, who crossed ALCs with domestic cats in 1963. Twenty years of breeding resulted in the breed that was accepted as truly domestic by TICA. Bengal cats are large cats with distinctive markings. Generations F4 and beyond are considered to be good house pets.

Hi Farhood, thanks for reaching out to us! Thanks for taking care of this little stray 🙂 If you say she doesn’t display any of the symptoms and is eating well, it wouldn’t seem like she has any underlying issue. That is pretty hot, so make sure she has an area nicely covered by shade (plants, garden, etc). She isn’t panting, is she? Panting shows signs of heat exhaustion. Here, please read our article on keeping cats cool in the summer. Hope it helps! Best of luck.


I took my cat into the vet Monday and Tuesday. he was giving a shot to bring down his fever both times also antibiotics that he is still receiving morning and night.he was acting up not eating not drinking water and a fever. Wednesday and thursday he was just fine being normal but he still hasn't ate a lot. Thursday night his breathing started to become fast and short what could this be. Vet did not believe this was distemoer.
Cat fanciers may think that Russian Blues only have blue coating, but this isn’t always the case. In other cat associations such as New Zealand and Australia, the term “Russians” can be applied to black and white varieties, alongside the traditional blues. Even the U.S. Cat Fanciers Association and TICA allows black-colored Russians or Russian Whites into play in provisional cases.
The Chausie (/ˈtʃaʊsi/) is a domestic breed of cat that was developed by breeding a few individuals from the non-domestic species jungle cat (Felis chaus) to a far greater number of domestic cats (Felis silvestris catus). The Chausie was first recognized as a domestic breed by The International Cat Association (TICA) in 1995.[1] Within the domestic breeds, the Chausie is categorized as a non-domestic hybrid source breed.[2] Because Chausies are mostly descended from domestic cats, by about the fourth generation they are fully fertile and completely domestic in temperament.
Blood transfusion for acutely anemic cats or cats who have suffered significant blood loss or kittens who have neonatal isoerythrolysis. Blood typing must be carried out before a blood transfusion. Cats have three blood types, Type A, Type B and Type AB.  Type A cats can only receive type A blood, Type B cats can only receive type B blood, and Type AB cats can receive blood from type AB blood or type A blood.
Hybrids have always been popular. They make people feel connected with the wilderness outside. We can’t all own lions and tigers (nor should we), but so many people want little felines that resemble their larger, exotic cousins. Some breeders have begun breeding smaller wild species with domestic cats to create beautiful hybrids that are safe for the average cat owner to live with. Although hybrids are still controversial, there is no denying how unique and beautiful they are. Take a look at the most popular hybrids below.
In 1912 the Foreign Blue, one of the breed’s early names, warranted their own class and finally got separated from the blue cats variety. Progress of the cat’s popularity was halted, with the breed coming dangerously close to extinction during the onset of World War II. Breeders tried to revive the line by crossing the Russian Blue to Bluepoint Siamese and British Blues. Scandinavian breeders tried the same using Finland blue cats and Siamese blues.
Big cats spawn on grass blocks at light levels of 9 or more in groups of up to 4. Some cats only spawn in certain biomes: leopards spawn in jungles, forests and forest variants; lions, panthers and tigers spawn in plains and forests; and snow leopards spawn in cold biomes. Lions and tigers also spawn more frequently than panthers. There is a 1/20 chance for a white lion, white lioness or white tiger to spawn.

Our orange tabby kitten 11 weeks is having "episodes" of rapid breathing and horrible watery eyes. It starts nightly at about 5pm. It's a constant drip like a faucet is on and he is drenched. Starts from the right eye and then the left starts going. It drips down his face into his nose and then into the sides of his mouth where it pools until it drips out. During this he is lethargic and has severe rapid breathing. No fever, no diarrhea, no weight loss. lungs sound clear. eating and drinking water. Very playful like a kitten. It just this episode once a night in the evening.
Inconsistency in breed classification and naming among registries means that an individual animal may be considered different breeds by different registries (though not necessarily eligible for registry in them all, depending on its exact ancestry). For example, the TICA's Himalayan is considered a colorpoint variety of the Persian by the CFA, while the Javanese (or Colorpoint Longhair) is a color variation of the Balinese in the TICA and the CFA; both breeds are merged (along with the Colorpoint Shorthair) into a single "mega-breed", the Colourpoint, in the World Cat Federation (WCF), who have repurposed the name "Javanese" for the Oriental Longhair. Also, "Colo[u]rpoint Longhair" refers to multiple different breeds in some other registries. There are several examples of nomenclatural confusion of this sort. Furthermore, many geographical and cultural names for cat breeds are fanciful selections made by Western breeders to be "exotic"-sounding and bear no relationship to the actual origin of the breeds;[4] the Balinese, Javanese, and Himalayan are all examples of this trend.

Breathing rates may change for a variety of reasons and in some sleeping positions the airway may be slightly occluded which may result in altered breathing but without examining Kiki I cannot say for certain whether it is something to be concerned about or not. As for drinking, some cats may drink less that are on a wet food diet but you should ensure that she is keeping hydrated; you should visit your Veterinarian for a general check about the breathing and they can also check the hydration too. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM


Oh, she’s blue all right — with a silver cast that electrifies this feline! A diluted version of the gene responsible for black hair is what produces the silvery coat seen on the Russian Blue. But that’s not the only thing that keeps her in a class of her own: Her bright green eyes, silky-to-the-touch double-layered coat and lithe body make her one of a kind.
I hope that you can help me At school my granddaughter is currently (she is 8) working on wild cats. I have volunteered to make her a book of photographs and information on cats through the alphabet. There are two that I have not been able to find (hours on Google) V & X I was wondering if someone can help on a name (or Latin) for an obscure feline or subspecies. I think I will have to give up on the X but I’ve bent the rules a bit and will use Xausted and shown a lion sleeping in… Read more »
The first Savannah hybrid was born in 1986 and named Savannah by breeder Judee Frank. That cat's traits inspired Patrick Kelly to team with Joyce Sroufe to develop the breed. A Savannah is the largest of all domestic cats, can leap great distances, and is illegal to own in some states. They are intelligent, curious, and often remind their owners of a dog. The International Cat Association (TICA) recognizes Savannahs as a championship breed. 
There are many different conditions which may be affecting Braxton which may include infections, parasites among other causes; if the breathing is affected you should visit a Veterinarian for a thorough examination to be on the safe side since I cannot advise any treatment without examining Braxton first especially due to her age. Continue with kitten milk replacer in the meantime. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
My cat was originally a stray and when I found her she was in perfect healthy. We regularly took her to her check ups. She is tiny but she appears to be an American shorthair. But, as of recently she started breathing weirdly. She would lay on her stomach and this rattle sound would emit from her body. Her breathes would change from shallow and rapid to deep and slow. Before this happened, she had a slight cough with the same rattle noise. Like a human with an infection in their lungs. When we took her to the vet they would tell us she was fine. She was active and still regularly eating. We've taken her to multiple veterinary clinics and they've all told us they aren't sure what she has. They've done multiple Xrays and still cant seem to narrow the problem. We've put her on several antibiotics prescribed by the vet but nothing seems to make a dent. They offered the idea of asthma. We gave her treatment but still nothing. They told us it seemed that she had air pockets and some fluid. We ended up paying a ridiculous amount for treatment of a washout and still nothing. She eats regularly but her breathing is still the same. There was this one time she sneezed and big amount of mucus discharge came from her nose. No matter who we go to they all tell us we need to prescribe more expensive treatment just so they can say they don't know in the end. Can you help us?
The most commonly held theory regarding this breed’s origin is that Russian Blues were brought to Great Britain in 1860 by British sailors from the White Sea port town of Archangel (Arkhangelsk) in northern Russia. Whether this story is true—and if true, whether the cats really originated in that area—is anyone’s guess. Their thick coats give credence to the theory that they developed in a cold climate, and, according to accounts, blue shorthairs still exist in Russia.
Cat sleeping all day which isn't like him at all. Once in awhile has asthma type cough gag hairball, once in awhile has tounge out and short shallow breaths. Lays long with body and neck stretched once in awhile. now he's been curled up in ball n won't move really except to lay down again or stretch. He's recently caught a mouse and bird. And month ago was sprayed in face area by a skunk. And just yesterday I noticed his back class are all split n frayed worn down.
You’ll be immediately drawn to the Russian Blue’s shining green eyes and the silver-like, smooth coat. While majority of the coat is colored bright blue, the foot may sometimes have a lavender base that darkens as it travels upwards to the guard hair tips, which is the cat’s protective topcoat. The ends of each strand of fur sparkles with silver, often resembling the tips of spears when the light catches it.
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