I took my senior cat Butters to the vets just a few weeks ago and the vet did just a physical exam. Said he was very healthy for a senior and looked great. Just two weeks before the appointment I had noticed he put on weight out of no where.. so since the visit I have noticed that he’s breathing very heavily and quickly and it shows in his abdominal. No panting though. I also noticed that he is purring more than usual. He was always did purr as he’s a loving and content boy, but I’ve noticed it even when I am not giving him affection and he is sitting next to me. Should I be worried at all?
Your cat’s health is of the utmost importance, and at some point, most owners are faced with a confusing medical issue they must confront. Do cat’s normally breathe fast? Yes but only in very specific conditions. If you’ve found yourself looking at your furry friend and wondering “My cat is breathing fast – what should I do?” your next step is to make an informed decision of how to react to this respiratory difficulty.
My cat seems to be a really healthy cat. I recently brought him to the vet and he had a physical exam done. They didn't find any problems. However, I do notice that he has always been a fast breather. I have two cats, and one has always breathed faster than the other and meowed a lot more than the other. However, other than those two things he seems fine - eats well, very active, skin and fur look great, etc. Do I need to be worried enough to take him to get a blood test?
The Ocicat was named for its resemblance to an ocelot, but it has no actual ocelot, or any wild cat, in its family tree—at least since the breed was developed in 1964. Only its appearance earned it a spot on this list. Virginia Daly, a longtime Michigan cat breeder, was trying to get a Siamese cat with Abyssinian points. She bred together cats with Abyssinian, Siamese, and American shorthair lineages. A kitten named Tonga resulted, which had ivory-colored fur with golden spots. Tonga was not used for breeding, but the same parents later produced kittens with the same markings. Ocicats come in a variety of colors, but are known for their spots. The breed standards say an Ocicat should be heavier than it appears and be well-muscled. Ocicats are sociable and their behavior may remind you of a dog—such as the way many like to play fetch. The Ocicat is recognized by TICA as a championship breed. 
There are a few possible causes of rapid breathing or increased respiration rate in cats which may be due to allergies, infection, foreign objects, sign of pain, other pulmonary problems among other issues. It is important that any serious causes or ruled out or treated, it would be best to have your Veterinarian give Darcy a check up to be on the safe side on your next visit as 80 breaths per minute is around double the physiological range. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM www.vet.cornell.edu/fhc/Health_Information/dyspnea.cfm
Hybrids have always been popular. They make people feel connected with the wilderness outside. We can’t all own lions and tigers (nor should we), but so many people want little felines that resemble their larger, exotic cousins. Some breeders have begun breeding smaller wild species with domestic cats to create beautiful hybrids that are safe for the average cat owner to live with. Although hybrids are still controversial, there is no denying how unique and beautiful they are. Take a look at the most popular hybrids below.
This breed does not like change, preferring for things to be uniform and predictable. It can be thrown off when dinnertime is altered, and is nit-picky about hygiene. It will not even enter its litter box if it is dirty. In the early years, this breed developed a reputation at shows for being difficult to work with because of traits like these. The Russian Blue was gentle and happy at home, but at shows it was visibly discontent and temperamental. Popularity declined and fewer Russian Blues were being shown until breeders focused on improving the attitudes of the breed through selective breeding and behavior management (e.g., soft music, recording of show noises, crystals, herbal remedies). This commitment to the breed paid off, and today the Russian Blue is a happy participant at cat shows.
Hi, My cat fell from our 3rd floor window 1 month ago. Hopefully i found him immediately and brought her to the vet. She had her mouth bleeding. The vet did an injection and xrayed her. She only had a palate wound, but the vet said that it was mostly on the hard palate and that she doesn’t need any stitches if she eats normally. Luckily when we got back home she immediately ate, drank water and went to the toilet. I want to think everything went back to normal but sometimes i find her breathing very fast, today she even panted when we were playing around and also i notice her sometimes blinking only one eye. When i asked our vet she says if the cat has a problem with her lungs she would breath rapidly all the time and not just sometimes. She said everything should be fine. But i am still worried, should i be?
There is no approved adulticide (medications to kill adult heartworms) treatments for cats. Adulticides are themselves dangerous. A single dead worm can be fatal in cats as it can break away and cause a blockage of the pulmonary artery (pulmonary embolism). Heartworms in cats have a shorter lifespan than those in dogs; therefore it is preferable to manage symptoms and use a wait and see approach.
After I had a party at my house a few days ago, my cat has been acting very differently. He sleeps all day and only gets up to pee or poop, doesn't eat and drink as much as he used to, and starts breathing more rapidly and heavily. I've brought him to a vet and they said that it's likely due to stress caused by the party, and for the past couple of days I've been giving him liquid food and vitamins with a pipette, but I feel like his breathing has actually gone worse. I'm just afraid that the vet misdiagnosed him (since I live in a rural town in Indonesia, I don't really trust the vet here), so do you think there's something more going on than just stress? Oh and if it helps, my cat had just done his first vaccination about a week ago. Thank you
There are many possible causes for a cat to feel lethargic with an increased respiratory rate which may include infections, gastrointestinal obstruction (increased breathing rate due to pain), anaemia (less red blood cells lead to an increase in respiration) among other causes; you should keep a close eye on Buddy, but it would be wise to visit your Veterinarian to help narrow in on a specific cause for the lethargy as there are many possible causes. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
If you maintain a good hygiene routine, your Russian blue will require minimal grooming and healthcare. There are several necessary items for keeping a cat comfortable after adoption, such as investing in a toothbrush and cat-safe toothpaste (you can find these items for purchase at your local pet store or online) to keep her teeth clean and white, and a medium-toothed comb to keep her double coat smooth and luxurious. One important piece of Russian blue cat breed information is that these kitties love mealtime, so make sure that she doesn't overeat. She probably asks for food multiple times a day, but remain firm and stick to regularly scheduled feedings, using measured amounts of cat food, and avoid too many cat treats.
Regarding the Savannah and those wishing to add one as a member of their family… Do your research! Because of the lineage of the Savannah, and the fact that they are not far removed from their wild side, there are laws of the location where you live to look into. Some places are requiring licenses to own these hybrids, others don’t allow them at all, while still others are legal to own an animal that is farther removers, for example an F1 or F2 is illegal but anything past an F3 is okay.

So, my cat has been breathing fast for the last two days. She has been eating, drinking water and peeing/pooping normally as it seems... We had a big clean up in the house and all of us (humans and cats) were sneezing for a while so that is one of the possibilities, I guess...The other thing is that we had the sand of the sand box changed to one with a smell so maybe that was giving her allergies or something... These are two possibilities but I'm still worried. Do you think I should be concerned?
It is possible that Milu is breathing rapidly due to pain, falling from that height may have left Milu with some permanent injury which occasionally causes some pain; however without examining him I cannot say with any certainty. You should continue to monitor him and look out for any other symptoms, but any head trauma may present with issue later on in life. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
In 1900, Carl Hagenbeck crossed a female leopard with a Bengal tiger. The stillborn offspring had a mixture of spots, rosettes and stripes. Henry Scherren wrote, “A male tiger from Penang served two female Indian leopards, and twice with success. Details are not given and the story concludes somewhat lamely. ‘The leopardess dropped her cubs prematurely, the embryos were in the first stage of development and were scarcely as big as young mice.’ Of the second leopardess there is no mention.”
Care: Russian Blue cats are fairly easy to care for. Their coats simply need to be brushed once a week so that they stay can show off their beautiful blue color. They may require more brushing when they are going through a season of shedding. Trim their nails and clean their ears as needed to keep them looking lovely. And, as with any cat, it is important to regularly brush their teeth to prevent periodontal disease. If you are looking for a hypoallergenic cat then the Russian Blue cat is a great candidate. They produce less of the Fel D1 protein which is the true cause for your allergic reaction. There is no cat that is 100% allergy free so increasing the frequency of grooming and bathing your furry friend will also help.
Lethargy and increased respiratory rate are not specific symptoms as they are shared with many conditions; however I’m concerned that they are a common sign that an animal is in pain, but without examining Marilyn I cannot say whether she is in pain or there is another cause for the symptoms. You should visit your Veterinarian for an examination to be on the safe side especially if this has been going on for a day or more. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

A loss of appetite and lethargy are both vague symptoms but the rapid breathing is concerning, you should visit your Veterinarian for an examination as rapid breathing may be associated with pain, anaemia, heart disease among many other conditions. Without examining Ozzy I cannot determine the specific underlying cause of the symptoms and would recommend that a visit to your Veterinarian be made before the weekend. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
Hybrids have always been popular. They make people feel connected with the wilderness outside. We can’t all own lions and tigers (nor should we), but so many people want little felines that resemble their larger, exotic cousins. Some breeders have begun breeding smaller wild species with domestic cats to create beautiful hybrids that are safe for the average cat owner to live with. Although hybrids are still controversial, there is no denying how unique and beautiful they are. Take a look at the most popular hybrids below.
The Russian Blue stands out for his coat color. To the uninformed, he might look gray, but in cat show terms he is an even, bright blue with silver-tipped hairs that make him seem to glisten. Some Russian Blue kittens are born with “ghost stripes,” a reminder of the tabby gene that all cats carry, even if it isn’t expressed in their coat, but these generally fade, leaving the cat with the solid blue coat of maturity. 

This is a well-behaved cat that is easy to train. Or, rather, it easily trains its people. It enjoys a good game of fetch and will keep the game going longer than you may have time for, and you will make time because the Russian Blue is known for actually appearing hurt when it has been ignored. Elegant, and reserved, this cat is also very playful, and loves to chase after toys or sunbeams.
You’ll be immediately drawn to the Russian Blue’s shining green eyes and the silver-like, smooth coat. While majority of the coat is colored bright blue, the foot may sometimes have a lavender base that darkens as it travels upwards to the guard hair tips, which is the cat’s protective topcoat. The ends of each strand of fur sparkles with silver, often resembling the tips of spears when the light catches it.
Hi! This is my first time using this website. I adopted a kitten from the humane society two months ago. She is currently 6 months old. She is an extremely sweet and loving kitten and have had no problems with her except for some gum swelling around 5 mo. I took her to a vet and was told she was fine, the gum swelling went down and she lost some baby teeth. I assumed the gum swelling was from that. I am now noticing in her rapid breathing when she is resting, and more recently, at random times she makes a monotone short snore sound. It’s almost as if she is having issues breathing. I have noticed zero behavioral changes. She seems to be doing fine, however I know cats can hide their issues well. I will add she is a Siamese kitten and talks like one!
There are many different causes for rapid breathing in cats which may include pain, respiratory infection, heart failure among other causes. Without an examination and thorough auscultation of the chest, I cannot say what the cause is or the best course of treatment; anytime resting respiratory rate is over 40 breaths per minute, you should visit your Veterinarian as soon as possible. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
You shouldn’t notice breathing rates over 40 breaths per minute in a resting cat; an increase in respiration may be due to inadequate airflow, malpositioning of the throat, respiratory infection, heart issues among other causes. Without examining Roxanne I cannot say for sure what is happening, keep a close eye on her and if you decide to have her fixed speak with your Veterinarian then. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
Thank you for your question, and I am sorry about Billi. Unfortunately, without seeing the x-ray, knowing where or how large the tumor is, I can't comment on possible solutions. Lung masses are difficult to treat and tend not to respond well to therapy, but it really does depend on the type of mass, and he is quite young to have lung cancer. Sometimes we are able to to a tracheal wash to try and identify the type of cells, but I'm not sure if that is an option for Billi. Any possible treatments would be a good conversation with your veterinarian, who has seen Billi, and his x-rays, and knows more about his situation. I hope that he does well.

Inconsistency in breed classification and naming among registries means that an individual animal may be considered different breeds by different registries (though not necessarily eligible for registry in them all, depending on its exact ancestry). For example, the TICA's Himalayan is considered a colorpoint variety of the Persian by the CFA, while the Javanese (or Colorpoint Longhair) is a color variation of the Balinese in the TICA and the CFA; both breeds are merged (along with the Colorpoint Shorthair) into a single "mega-breed", the Colourpoint, in the World Cat Federation (WCF), who have repurposed the name "Javanese" for the Oriental Longhair. Also, "Colo[u]rpoint Longhair" refers to multiple different breeds in some other registries. There are several examples of nomenclatural confusion of this sort. Furthermore, many geographical and cultural names for cat breeds are fanciful selections made by Western breeders to be "exotic"-sounding and bear no relationship to the actual origin of the breeds;[4] the Balinese, Javanese, and Himalayan are all examples of this trend.
Savannah cats are created by crossing a house cat with an African Serval. The original hybrid is called an F1 and is considered too "wild" to be a house cat. When you breed an F1 Savannah with another Savannah or another cat breed, the resulting kittens are called F2. Breeding F2 females produces a generation called F3, which still has a considerable amount of Serval genes, but three generations of domesticity. F1 females are retained as breeding stock, although the male hybrids are often infertile. Sometimes F2 or F1 Savannahs are bred with Servals to create Savannahs with a higher number of Serval genes. Or they may be bred with Savannah males of even later generations (F5 or F6). Male Savannahs are usually sterile in the first few generations.
Serval or descendents of servals such as the Savannah F 1 are tough cats to domesticate. They are technically still a wild animal with wild attributes. They can leap 10 -15 feet, with claws like a Bobcat. They are only partial to one owner which it will defend like a child, so i a stranger gets close….watch out. Cost if anyone is interested is approximately $5000 – $7500. Not a cheap price to make a potentially bad decision.
Our orange tabby kitten 11 weeks is having "episodes" of rapid breathing and horrible watery eyes. It starts nightly at about 5pm. It's a constant drip like a faucet is on and he is drenched. Starts from the right eye and then the left starts going. It drips down his face into his nose and then into the sides of his mouth where it pools until it drips out. During this he is lethargic and has severe rapid breathing. No fever, no diarrhea, no weight loss. lungs sound clear. eating and drinking water. Very playful like a kitten. It just this episode once a night in the evening.
The Russian Blue’s elegant yet muscular body led one cat judge to proclaim him the “Doberman Pinscher of cats.” He has what’s called a semi-foreign body type, meaning it is moderate in shape, falling somewhere between the short, compact body of breeds such as Persians and the sleek angles of Oriental breeds such as the Siamese. The Cat Fanciers Association breed standard for the Russian Blue calls for him to have a head that is a smooth, medium-size wedge shape with a blunt muzzle. The broad wedge of the head and its flat skull are often described as cobra-like, although that is much too dangerous a description for this sweet-natured cat. Regal is perhaps a better term. Large ears are wide at the base with pointed tips, the interior lined with thin, translucent skin, and rounded vivid green eyes are set wide apart. A long, slender neck segues into high shoulder blades and a fine-boned body that is firm and muscular, covered with a short, thick double coat with a plush texture, often described as similar to that of a seal or beaver. If you were to run your fingers through a Russian Blue’s coat, the patterns they made would remain until they were petted smooth. The body is supported by long, fine-boned legs set on small, slightly rounded paws with pads that are a pinky lavender or mauve shade. The tail is long but in proportion to the body.

Hi. My cat has been lethargic for 4 days and spends lots of time under the bed. An inconclusive chest xray looked spotty and web-like in her lungs. My vet suggested valley fever tests but also said it could be cancer. She walks uneasy, but still attempts to eat and makes it to the litter box. She appears very restless and uncomfortable. I am giving her subQ fluids, an anti-fungal and pain meds to get her through the rough patch.
A cat may have rapid breathing for a variety of different reasons which may include infections, pain, high temperature (to cool down), heart failure among other causes; if your Veterinarian was unable to identify a cause, you should keep a close eye on Skittle and see if there is anything which occurs before an episode as it may be a reaction to anxiety from something. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
Chester was taken in last night for an abscess removal surgery on his neck. I got him back this morning and he is having trouble using his litter box. are there any suggestions to help him use it? also, the vet prescribed 2 antibiotics but no pain reliever for chester. he has a drain in his face and i could only imagine how painful it will be for the next few days until he gets it removed. i was told that chester was given a pain medication shot. how long is this supposed to last? it doesn't seem humane to let him go back home without the necessary pain relief medication. In addition, his breathing is quite fast. is that normal for a post abscess removal surgery?
My cat was seen by my vet 2 days ago for lethargy, loss of appetite and rapid breathing. The vet diagnosed a viral or bacterial infection and slight dehydration. She had a temp of 103.4. She was given I.V. fluid, a long acting antibiotic shot and a fever reducer. She's not much better. Should I give the medication more time to work or does she need to be seen again.
Those animals were then bred indiscriminately, and many purposely inbred for traits such as white coats, tiny size, and docile (read retarded) temperament. None of the exotic cats in wild hands can be traced back to the wild, other than local cats, cougars and bobcats, who may have been snatched from the wild in the U.S. For that reason they can never be bred for introduction back to the wild.
Without an examination and possibly a blood test, it is difficult to say what the cause for Buddy’s symptoms are; however eclampsia is a possible cause and would require immediate attention from a Veterinarian if this is the case. I am not sure about veterinary care in Jordan but I know that there is a veterinary school in Al Ramtha, Irbid, Jordan if that is close to you if you require veterinary care. https://wagwalking.com/cat/condition/eclampsia- www.just.edu.jo/FacultiesandDepartments/FacultyOfVeterinaryMedicine/Pages/Default.aspx
Lion coloration is usually orange-brown, with the exception of white lions. The underparts are generally lighter and the tail tuft is black. One of the most distinctive features about lions is that male lions have a large mane, whereas lionesses lack manes. The way to tell the difference between a male and a lioness cub is by looking at their neck; male cubs have small black manes, however, it is more difficult to to tell the difference between a male and female white lion cub.
In 1900, Carl Hagenbeck crossed a female leopard with a Bengal tiger. The stillborn offspring had a mixture of spots, rosettes and stripes. Henry Scherren wrote, “A male tiger from Penang served two female Indian leopards, and twice with success. Details are not given and the story concludes somewhat lamely. ‘The leopardess dropped her cubs prematurely, the embryos were in the first stage of development and were scarcely as big as young mice.’ Of the second leopardess there is no mention.”
Regardless, you should visit your Veterinarian or an Emergency Veterinarian to examine Gizmo since she should be eating and drinking normally after this routine surgery and the ‘seizure like’ activity is also concerning; the moderate increase in respiration may be due to discomfort from surgery or due to something more serious. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
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