After I had a party at my house a few days ago, my cat has been acting very differently. He sleeps all day and only gets up to pee or poop, doesn't eat and drink as much as he used to, and starts breathing more rapidly and heavily. I've brought him to a vet and they said that it's likely due to stress caused by the party, and for the past couple of days I've been giving him liquid food and vitamins with a pipette, but I feel like his breathing has actually gone worse. I'm just afraid that the vet misdiagnosed him (since I live in a rural town in Indonesia, I don't really trust the vet here), so do you think there's something more going on than just stress? Oh and if it helps, my cat had just done his first vaccination about a week ago. Thank you

So from your question it seems like the abscess was treated successfully but now you’re noticing at the respiratory rate is increased; there are many different causes for an increased respiratory rate which may include pain, heart disease, stress among other causes. Without examining Kitty I cannot (legally) diagnose a particular condition or offer treatment; you should return to your Veterinarian for another examination especially since there are many possible causes which it could be. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM


If your cat is having difficulty breathing, this can be a life threatening emergency. It is important to have your cat seen by a veterinarian as soon as possible. You will need to give a thorough history of your cat's health, onset of symptoms, and possible incidents that might have preceded this condition. During the examination, the veterinarian will carefully observe how your cat breathes, and will listen to its chest for evidence of a heart murmur or fluid in the lungs. Your cat's gum color will be carefully evaluated as well, since the color of the gums can indicate whether oxygen is being delivered to the organs (hypoxemia) effectively, or if it there is a low red blood cell count (anemia). Your veterinarian may try to get your cat to cough by pressing on its windpipe. If your cat is having extreme difficulty breathing, the veterinarian will give your cat oxygen to help it breathe before doing any more tests.
A loss of appetite and lethargy are both vague symptoms but the rapid breathing is concerning, you should visit your Veterinarian for an examination as rapid breathing may be associated with pain, anaemia, heart disease among many other conditions. Without examining Ozzy I cannot determine the specific underlying cause of the symptoms and would recommend that a visit to your Veterinarian be made before the weekend. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
Hybrids have always been popular. They make people feel connected with the wilderness outside. We can’t all own lions and tigers (nor should we), but so many people want little felines that resemble their larger, exotic cousins. Some breeders have begun breeding smaller wild species with domestic cats to create beautiful hybrids that are safe for the average cat owner to live with. Although hybrids are still controversial, there is no denying how unique and beautiful they are. Take a look at the most popular hybrids below.
This semi-long-haired feline is native to Norway, according to the Cat Fancier’s Association, and everything it does, it does when it’s good and ready.  (You got that?) They’re described as sensitive, social and friendly but on their own terms. Despite their outdoorsy name, they’re quite happy inside but do require a scratching post and cat tree — preferably with an outdoor view — to keep them stimulated.
I was under the impression that a Bobcat (meaning the wild kind) would be thinking dinner if he ran across a domestic cat. Bobcats are also so much bigger than a normal housecat. I can't imagine them breeding. Do they really breed in the "wild?" I got to see a bobcat closeup at a cat rescue (the owner used to do wildlife rescue and this guy couldn't go back to the wild) and I just can't imagine him wanting to breed with a domestic cat, as opposed to eating it.
Queening is a painful process just like childbirth is for humans and some heavy breathing or panting may occur afterwards for a few days due to discomfort. But if you feel that she is straining or in distress you should visit your Veterinarian to check her over to ensure that there isn’t a retained kitten or another issue leading to these symptoms. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
Russian Blues have a tolerant nature toward children who treat them kindly and respectfully. They will even put up with the clumsy pats given by toddlers, as if they recognize that no harm is meant, and if necessary they will walk away or climb out of reach to escape being bonked on the head. That said, the patient and gentle Russian Blue should always be protected from rough treatment, so always supervise very young children when they want to pet the cat.
Thank you for your email. Since Tortie was just seen by your veterinarian and was deemed healthy, her periodic bouts of rapid breathing may be normal, and may follow bouts of exertion or anxiety. If the periods that she is breathing rapidly become more frequent, or more severe, it would be a good idea to have her seen by your veterinarian and examined to make sure that she is okay. It might be helpful to video the episode, since she doesn't seem to breathe that way when she is at an appointment. I hope that she is okay!
Lion coloration is usually orange-brown, with the exception of white lions. The underparts are generally lighter and the tail tuft is black. One of the most distinctive features about lions is that male lions have a large mane, whereas lionesses lack manes. The way to tell the difference between a male and a lioness cub is by looking at their neck; male cubs have small black manes, however, it is more difficult to to tell the difference between a male and female white lion cub.
There are various different causes for rapid breathing and rapid heart rate which may be caused by stress, poisoning, infections, anaemia, heart disease among many other conditions; if there are behavioural changes like hiding there may be fear or another similar component. Without examining Wagamama I cannot say whether or not there is a cause for concern or not, but you should have your Veterinarian check her over to be on the safe side. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

Hello. My cay spooky was hospitalized last night for suspected poisoning from bug spray. He was stabilized and spent the night with iv and vitamins, pain medication etc. Today at around 5 they released him to be watched at home and he seems much better although he seems to be having rapid breaths or a hard time breathing. I can hear it and he seems to be straining. Is this from all the medication or residual poison? will it pass?
The Chausie was developed from hybrids of the Jungle Cat (Felis chaus), the largest species of the genus Felis, found in Asia. They can grow up to three feet long and weigh 35 pounds, but are generally around 18 pounds. Like the hybrids that developed into the Savannah and Bengal breeds, the males of the first few generations are usually infertile, and the F4 and F5 are considered truly domestic and suitable for cat shows. TICA classifies the Chausie as a championship breed.
^ "Colorpoint Longhair" has multiple meanings and "Javanese" has been used for at least one other breed; the WCF uses the "Javanese" name for the Oriental Longhair (not colorpointed). The WCF has also merged the colorpointed Javanese/Colorpoint Longhair, the Himalayan and the Colourpoint Shorthair of other registries into a single breed, the Colourpoint. In the CFA, the TICA and some other registries, the Javanese/Colorpoint Longhair has merged back into the Balinese as a division
It would put my mind at ease if someone could tell me more about the possibilities of bobcat-domestic breeding, or point me somewhere that would explain just what such an offspring (if possible) would look like. I keep coming up with incredibly vague answers from the websites I've searched. I assume she's just a domestic, but I thought I should look into it more before she grows larger.
Inconsistency in breed classification and naming among registries means that an individual animal may be considered different breeds by different registries (though not necessarily eligible for registry in them all, depending on its exact ancestry). For example, the TICA's Himalayan is considered a colorpoint variety of the Persian by the CFA, while the Javanese (or Colorpoint Longhair) is a color variation of the Balinese in the TICA and the CFA; both breeds are merged (along with the Colorpoint Shorthair) into a single "mega-breed", the Colourpoint, in the World Cat Federation (WCF), who have repurposed the name "Javanese" for the Oriental Longhair. Also, "Colo[u]rpoint Longhair" refers to multiple different breeds in some other registries. There are several examples of nomenclatural confusion of this sort. Furthermore, many geographical and cultural names for cat breeds are fanciful selections made by Western breeders to be "exotic"-sounding and bear no relationship to the actual origin of the breeds;[4] the Balinese, Javanese, and Himalayan are all examples of this trend.

I'm not sure, without seeing Lily, why her breathing is so elevated, whether it is pain, infection, or another trauma related incident. The antibiotic injection may help, or she may need further care, as she did go through a very traumatic event. If her breathing has not improved over the next 12-24 hours, it would be best to have a recheck for her - she may need tonging care until all of this is resolved.
The next step would be to have a fine needle aspirate done on the popliteal lymph nodes to determine the types of cells present; lymph nodes can aggregate white blood cells in response to many conditions so an examination of the aspirate would be useful. With other parameters coming back normal, it is difficult to say what the specific cause is; but speak with your Veterinarian about performing a fine needle aspirate to help narrow in on a diagnosis. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

I was given an Enisyl-F Pump and have been administering that every 12 hours as instructed. The cause for my question, is two days later she has began breathing in the same manner that caused me to call the Vetenarian in the first place. It began for a good ten to twenty minutes and now she’s since stopped. I’m wondering is this normal or is it serious and if so should I take her back to the emergency Vet?


^ "Colorpoint Longhair" has multiple meanings and "Javanese" has been used for at least one other breed; the WCF uses the "Javanese" name for the Oriental Longhair (not colorpointed). The WCF has also merged the colorpointed Javanese/Colorpoint Longhair, the Himalayan and the Colourpoint Shorthair of other registries into a single breed, the Colourpoint. In the CFA, the TICA and some other registries, the Javanese/Colorpoint Longhair has merged back into the Balinese as a division 

The Bengal cat is a considerably older breed than the others in this list, but as a breed derived from a wild cat hybrid, it is worth a look. The Bengal breed, which developed from a cross between a domestic cat and an Asian leopard Cat, is also the starting point for other breeds in this list. There have been stories of naturally occurring crossbreeds in Asia from way back, with the oldest confirmed case in 1934. The breed as we know it began with geneticist Jean Sugden-Mills, who crossed ALCs with domestic cats in 1963. Twenty years of breeding resulted in the breed that was accepted as truly domestic by TICA. Bengal cats are large cats with distinctive markings. Generations F4 and beyond are considered to be good house pets.

We have a female persian cat and was diagnosed of cancer last December. Operation was scheduled right away but when the vet saw cancer cells spread all over he did not remove any of these cancer cells. So what we did, were are giving her turmeric everyday hoping it would help her in a way. It’s 5 months since then and i thought Cindy, name of our cat will continue to be well. But, something unusual i noticed, she is breathing rapidly and her appetite to eat lessen. Actually, she wants to eat but she can’t swallow the food. It breaks my heart to see her suffering difficulty in breathing. Is my cat dying? What medicine to give her to ease her breathing? Please advise. Vilma
Feeding tamed big cats raw fish, raw porkchops, raw beef or raw rabbit together in an enclosed space will activate love mode. They can either be fed the meat, or it can be dropped next to them. After being fed and paired together, love hearts will show around the breeding pair, and after around 5–10 minutes, a cub will be produced and the naming screen will appear.
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