The goal of breeding the Serengeti Cat is to produce a cat that resembles the wild Serval but does not contain any Serval bloodline. The first Serengeti Cat was bred by Karen Sausman in 1994 by crossing a Bengal and an Oriental Shorthair. This "foundation cat" and its progeny have been bred with many other types of cats to improve the breed—but no Servals. However, its lineage does include the Asian Leopard Cat whose genes contributed to its Bengal Cat ancestor. Serengeti Cats have long ears and long legs like a Serval, and a neck that does not taper where it meets the head. They are agile, active, and vocal. TICA classifies this cat as an advanced new breed.

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My cat (8-9 months) just got spayed 2 days ago. I have another cat so to be sure the wound was safe we got her a vest instead of a cone. she came home that afternoon and she was very quiet and would not walk around, we thought it was normal due to the vest and anesthesia. yesterday we noticed she isn't eating, drinking or going to the litterbox on her own. she only wants to lay down and sleep. If we bring her to the water, food, and litter box she'll do her things and just lay down again. we kept thinking she was just tired or did not like to walk with the vest so we went to sleep this morning o notice she is not in her bed but inside the transporter box, and breathing quite fast. My boyfriend took her to the vet, to do an X-ray and they said she had some pulmonary infection but they can't do the necessary tests to pinpoint exactly what is the issue because it requires anesthesia and she just had one a few days ago. they gave her some medicine bt it did not work and they are moving her to the vet hospital so she can have someone with her during the night. should I be worried, will she be ok?
Hi, our 15 year old girl, Buddha has gotten super weak so fast. She had a lump on her nose/lip area, which contributed to a number of doctor visits. They took blood, sample of the tissue, etc, everything came back normal. So the vet told us that if it doesn't bother us, to leave it be. She was still ok at that point just had that lump. Then after our last visit which was very stressful to her to say the least, when she came back home, we noticed that she was limping, that was new to us. The gradually, she started losing weight, so within two weeks she dropped almost 8 pounds, yet she is eating and very excited about it still. And now started the panting which has gotten worse a week ago, she's breathing heavy, with her whole stomach moving. And there are time when she's breathing with her mouse open and her tongue slightly sticking out. And she has started to pee all over the house, she still goes in her litter, but also all over the place. She is still eating, she's not hiding, still like to be pet and be around us, but at times I feel like she's so miserable. We don't know what to do at this point, another visit to the vet will be super stressful to her. And I have no idea what they can do, since last 4 visits did absolutely nothing but make her worse. :(
The name "Cheetoh cat" probably brings up the image of the laid-back cartoon cheetah named Chester who advertises Cheetos. But it is also a fairly new breed of house cat. According to the International Cheetoh Breeders Association, the Cheetoh is an attempt to breed a cat that looks more like a wild cat than other breeds but is still a gentle house pet. Carol Drymon bred the first Cheetoh in 2001 by crossing a Bengal and an Ocicat. A Cheetoh is a vary large cat, with healthy males reaching 23 pounds. Such a large cat with leopard-like spots may scare strangers, but is quite tame and as safe around children as any other house cat. TICA considers the Cheetoh an experimental breed.
All cats have something special about them that catches the eye. Some have lots of soft, gorgeous fur. Others have almost no fur at all. Some refuse to be ignored, and will draw your attention with loud meows, chirps, or will cut to the chase and put a tail in your face! These cats are remarkable for their size. If you’re looking up world records for cats, you’re likely to see one of these breeds with the prize for size!

Without knowing more about Cindy, the type of cancer and location, and her history, it isn't possible for me to comment on what might be happening to her now. It would be best to call your veterinarian, as they have seen her and know her history, and let them know what is going on. They'll be able to guide you in any possible treatments for her. I hope that she is okay.
My kitten has been in and out of the vet's office and is on strong antibiotics and oxygen since Oct. 26 until now and he is getting better for a few days and he is right back at it. He has spent a lot of time at the vet and the bill is getting high. He is home and I am giving him the antibiotics and oxygen at home and it does not seem to be helping here. But at the vet he does good after a day or two. How much oxygen do I give him at home and how often?
Give your Foreign Blue an adequate diet in the form of premium, dry cat food. You can spoil your cat from time to time and give him canned food that’s rich in protein. As they get older, dietary requirements may change, so it’s best to consult with a veterinarian for recommendations. When it’s time to change food, remember to add the new food gradually and mix it in the old one in the span of a few weeks or so. Make the transition too fast and your cat may get an upset tummy.
Lots of places claim to be breeding cats to save them from extinction when in fact they are not involved in any real conservation effort and rather are justifying their breeding to have babies who will bring in paying visitors and worse yet to sell.  Many people contact us each week saying they want to start a captive breeding program to save the cats from extinction, but the only viable programs currently being operated in such a manner as to accommodate this goal are being run by accredited zoos who will not work with the private sector.  Unless you can trace your cat’s pedigree all the way back to the wild and you have been accepted into the Species Survival Plan for that specific breed, you will not be aiding conservation, but rather will be contributing to the over abundance of unwanted animals.
In 1912 the Foreign Blue, one of the breed’s early names, warranted their own class and finally got separated from the blue cats variety. Progress of the cat’s popularity was halted, with the breed coming dangerously close to extinction during the onset of World War II. Breeders tried to revive the line by crossing the Russian Blue to Bluepoint Siamese and British Blues. Scandinavian breeders tried the same using Finland blue cats and Siamese blues.

Thoracic drainage tubes to remove fluids from the pleural cavity. Local anesthesia and IV sedation are administered to keep your cat comfortable during this procedure. Tubes will be flushed several times a day with 0.9% saline or lactated Ringers solution warmed to body temperature to wash the chest cavity (pleural lavage). Tubes will need to remain in place for between 4-6 days.


Lots of places claim to be breeding cats to save them from extinction when in fact they are not involved in any real conservation effort and rather are justifying their breeding to have babies who will bring in paying visitors and worse yet to sell.  Many people contact us each week saying they want to start a captive breeding program to save the cats from extinction, but the only viable programs currently being operated in such a manner as to accommodate this goal are being run by accredited zoos who will not work with the private sector.  Unless you can trace your cat’s pedigree all the way back to the wild and you have been accepted into the Species Survival Plan for that specific breed, you will not be aiding conservation, but rather will be contributing to the over abundance of unwanted animals.
My 4 year old cat,yuri,had diaherria and vomited after she vomited she started to breathe rapidly and acted uneasey we thought maybe she has heatstroke so we cooled her off and after that we thought she was OK but we did not realize later that she was still breathing rapidly and acting lethargic the whole day ,she also hasn't eaten anything at since morning and has drank very little water ,I've been very worried and been thinking to take her to the vet tomorrow morning ,just hoping you guys would give us some advice for the night
The Russian Blue is a gentle cat with a somewhat shy nature around strangers. They are devoted to and affectionate with their loved ones. Sensitive to their owner’s moods, the Russian Blue will greet you at the door, find a quiet seat next to you, or fetch a toy at playtime. In fact, “fetching” is a favorite pastime for Russians and their owners! Pull out the vacuum cleaner, and the Russian will find a safer and quieter location. Relatively quiet-voiced (except perhaps at mealtime), the Russian Blue appreciates a pat on the head, a window from which to watch the birds, and, of course, the comforts of home. Minimal grooming is required; regular nail clipping, good nutrition, an occasional combing, and lots of petting keep your Russian Blue pet looking spectacular.
Because they are easily startled, it’s best to keep equipment and devices that make loud noises, i.e., vacuum cleaners, blenders and such tucked away in a storage or a corner spot in the house. When this happens, scoop up your cat, place them in a quiet, safe spot and reassure him. Allocate a quiet space for your cat as sort of “sanctuary” so they can retreat as needed.

During the summertime, a quick bath can prevent excessive shedding. Regular brushing staves away periodontal diseases. Vets recommend brushing your cat’s teeth at least once a day. Using a cat-safe nail clippers, trim your pet’s claws at least once every few weeks or so. Don’t forget to pay attention to the ears and the eyes at least once a week. Brush at least once per week to get rid of loose hair and to lessen the chances of fur balls getting stuck inside your cat’s stomach.
Hi. My cat has been lethargic for 4 days and spends lots of time under the bed. An inconclusive chest xray looked spotty and web-like in her lungs. My vet suggested valley fever tests but also said it could be cancer. She walks uneasy, but still attempts to eat and makes it to the litter box. She appears very restless and uncomfortable. I am giving her subQ fluids, an anti-fungal and pain meds to get her through the rough patch.
Below are some zoos and pseudo sanctuaries in Florida.  These places breed and sell while lying to the public and saying they are doing it for conservation.  The file is large, so you may have to wait a bit for it to load fully and then hit play again. These are the ones that are open to the public. Many are much worse, but do not allow the public in to film.

I've adopted a cat that was dumped under our hedge. She is very skinny but is gaining weight in the week I've had her. She drinks about half a cup of water daily and breathes very rapidly even when resting. Is it normal for a cat that had been so skinny and is now gaining weight to have such rapid breathing? I'm concerned having been so starved her organs may have been affected, she is quite young. Otherwise she appears very content, alert and relaxed. Your thoughts would be appreciated.


There are other reasons, in the real world, why it doesn’t work, which includes the fact that human – big cat conflict is one of the main reasons cats are wiped out of areas. Captive breeding not only selectively chooses animals that are least fit for the wild but also conditions the cats to not fear humans. That increases the conflict and the result is that not only would the offending cat be killed, but likely any wild cat seen in the area would be hunted down and killed in a case of mistaken identity. That escalates the extinction of cats in the wild.

Tabbies: Tabby cats constitute the oldest and most common pattern seen and are one of the most popular. They are easily differentiated by their stripes, whorls, and spots ( the latter generally found on their tummies). Striped tabbies are often referred to as "tiger," for obvious reasons. They are also known as "mackerel tabbies." The round bulls-eye marking on the sides of a tabby identifies it as a "classic" tabby. While spotted tabbies sometimes crop up in "barn cats," they are also found in breeds, such as the Ocicat and the American Bobtail. Tabbies may also wear white "accessories," such as a bib, vest, or "boots." Thus, they could be described as "tabby with white."

These intelligent animals will require substantial amounts of physical and mental activity. Keep toys lying around the house at all times. When they feel the need to “hunt”, a ball of string or a toy fish should capture their attention for hours. Keep in mind that these types of toys require human supervision as the contents could be chewed up, which can be harmful for your cat’s health.


The first Savannah hybrid was born in 1986 and named Savannah by breeder Judee Frank. That cat's traits inspired Patrick Kelly to team with Joyce Sroufe to develop the breed. A Savannah is the largest of all domestic cats, can leap great distances, and is illegal to own in some states. They are intelligent, curious, and often remind their owners of a dog. The International Cat Association (TICA) recognizes Savannahs as a championship breed. 
Sorry to hear your kitty is scratching like that! Does he show any signs of skin infections, fleas, mites, wounds from other cats? The cone could have stressed him further, yes, if he was scratching already because of tension/anxiety. Open sores can get infected, especially when left untreated and scratched further. We would recommend taking your kitty to the vet for a diagnosis. They will be able to provide you the advice and medication your kitty might need. Best wishes!
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