Thank you for you email. unfortunately, without examining Kai, i can't comment on what might be going on with him. He needs to see his veterinarian to try and determine what is going on with him and how to treat him. If he seems to be in distress and unable to catch his breath, taking him to the emergency clinic tonight is most appropriate. I hope that he is okay.
Anemia is a condition characterised by a reduced number of red blood (also known as erythrocytes) cells in the blood. Is not a disease in itself but a symptom of an underlying condition. It can be due to the premature destruction of the red blood cells, decreased production (due to cancers, kidney disease, certain infections or drugs), blood loss, tumours, blood clotting disorders and parasites such as fleas and hookworm.
You should keep an eye on the kitten for now and ensure that he remains hydrated; rapid breathing may be attributable to numerous causes but shouldn’t be an issue unless he is in distress. See how he is over the next day or two, but if you don’t see any improvement you should visit your Veterinarian for another examination. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
First exhibited at London’s Crystal Palace in 1875 as the “Archangel Cat,” the original Russian Blue competed with all other blue cats. In 1912, the Russian Blue was given a separate class for competition as breeders in England and Scandinavia worked to develop the foundation bloodlines for the contemporary Russian Blue. Although Russian Blues were imported to the United States in the early 1900s, it wasn’t until after World War II that North American breeders began combining the European bloodlines to produce cats with plush, silvery coats, emerald eyes, and the distinctive profile. From the 1960s, the Russian Blue began gaining popularity and has become a favorite at cat shows and at home.
If you suspect that Dolly has heatstroke and she is unable to keep fluids down you should take her into your Veterinarian for an examination and intravenous fluids to restore hydration and to get her cooled down. A damp towel and a fan is one way to get a cat to cool down but if she isn’t able to keep down fluids you should treat it as an emergency. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

The first hybrids of the jungle cat (Felis chaus) and the domestic cat (Felis silvestris catus) may have been born in Egypt several thousand years ago.[2] The jungle cat is native to a vast region spanning Southeast Asia, India, and the Middle East (Sunquist, 2002). For the most part, it is an Asian species of wild cat that lives by rivers and lakes. But the species is found in one small area of North Africa: the Nile Delta. It is well known that the ancient Egyptians kept domestic cats as pets. Many domestic cat mummies have been found interred in Egyptian temples. What is not so well known is that one other species of cat was occasionally preserved after death via mummification; that was the jungle cat (Malek, 1993). F. chaus is not a timid species; they are known for moving into abandoned buildings and living as happily by irrigation canals as by wild rivers, provided that adequate prey and shrubbery for cover are available. Because domestic cats are likely to have frequently encountered jungle cats along the Nile and occasionally even within their owners' homes, it seems that hybrids of the two species were probably often born there.[3][better source needed]
Unlike horses, the breeding pair does not need to be kept away from other big cats, but they do need to be kept close in order to breed, therefore it is recommended to place them in a fenced area. Winged big cats, ghosts and hybrids are sterile and cannot be bred, and snow leopards, white lions and white lionesses cannot breed with other big cat species.

Watching the rate of breathing is one of the simple observations that you can make on a pet cat at home. This cat has a problem known as "tachypnoea", which means rapid breathing. IF you watch her side carefully, you'll notice that her sides are moving much more quickly than a normal cat at rest. Her problem is being investigated, so the precise cause is under review, but it's most likely that she has "hyperthyroidism", caused by a benign tumour on her thyroid gland


As with so many cat breeds, little is known of the Russian Blue’s origins. He probably does come from Russia—his thick coat is surely that of a cat from colder climes—and he is considered a natural breed, meaning Matushka Nature created him, not the handiwork of humans. The Russian Blue’s development as a breed, however, took place primarily in Britain and Scandinavia, starting in the late nineteenth century, when showing and breeding cats became a popular activity.
I'm afraid that I can't offer much more assistance for Bella than what you have already done, without being able to see or examine her. If she has not had a trans-tracheal wash, that may be one test that can help determine the type of cells that are present in her lungs, and if the x-rays have not been evaluated by a specialist, that is another possibility, as your veterinarian should be able to send those x-rays to be evaluated further.
The CFA describes the Foreign Blue as “having a medium-sized, smooth wedge for a head with a muzzle that’s short and blunt.” The flatness of the head and its wedge-shaped appearance can be likened to that of a cobra. At the head protrudes wide ears having a pointed tip. The eyes are wide-set and has a bright green tint. Overall, the eyes give the Foreign Blue a sweet expression that perfectly matches the breed’s outstandingly gentle temperament.
When my kitten is sleeping he breathes very quickly. He doesn’t do it once in while, he does it every single time and throughout the whole time he’s sleeping. I read online that to calculate their breathing, I should count how many times they breathe within a 15 second period and multiply it by 4. It also said they’re normal breathing rate should be around 25-30 and my kitten’s is 92. He’s seems pretty healthy, he eats he’s food, he’s drinking his water, he’s very active so I’m very confused about this.
All cats have something special about them that catches the eye. Some have lots of soft, gorgeous fur. Others have almost no fur at all. Some refuse to be ignored, and will draw your attention with loud meows, chirps, or will cut to the chase and put a tail in your face! These cats are remarkable for their size. If you’re looking up world records for cats, you’re likely to see one of these breeds with the prize for size!
What's wrong with my poor gravy? My cat Gravy has become extremely affectionate today and has followed me outside 3x, where he never ever goes! He's following me like a shadow and meowing at me more than normal. He doesn't seem to be in any pain, but his breathing and change of demeanor have me concerned. He's breathing fairly rapidly thru his nose, and he is moving his tail a lot also acting maybe as if he is worried?
A few people experimented with breeding F. chaus to F. s. catus in the late 1960s and 1970s. Their intention was to provide a sensible alternative to keeping non-domestic cats as pets. However, the Chausie breed did not truly begin until the 1990s, when a dedicated group of breeders named the breed "Chausie" (after Felis chaus) and developed a planned breeding program and goals.[4] These breeders asked for and received registration status from TICA in 1995. The breed worked its way through the New Breed Class from May 2001 through April 2013, and became TICA's newest Championship breed on May 1, 2013.[1] Chausies are now being bred in both North America and Europe. The breed has begun the new breed recognition process in the World Cat Federation (WCF).

Thank you for your email. Unfortunately, without examining Bella, I'm not sure if she is having a problem or not. If her behavior seems off, and her breathing is more rapid, it is worth paying attention to, and if you can get her in to see your veteirnarian before the storm hits tomorrow it would probably be a good idea, to make sure she is okay. I hope that all goes well for her!


My cat is about 9 years old, and about two days ago his breathing started to become very rapid at about 60-80 breaths per minute. He is eating properly and acting normally and doesn't appear to be in pain. Is there any reason this could be as this hasn't happened to any of our previous cats. He is also very healthy and has only gone to the vets for mess once for a urine infection he always has the de wormer and the anti flea drops as well as his vaccines


Cat sleeping all day which isn't like him at all. Once in awhile has asthma type cough gag hairball, once in awhile has tounge out and short shallow breaths. Lays long with body and neck stretched once in awhile. now he's been curled up in ball n won't move really except to lay down again or stretch. He's recently caught a mouse and bird. And month ago was sprayed in face area by a skunk. And just yesterday I noticed his back class are all split n frayed worn down.
This is a well-behaved cat that is easy to train. Or, rather, it easily trains its people. It enjoys a good game of fetch and will keep the game going longer than you may have time for, and you will make time because the Russian Blue is known for actually appearing hurt when it has been ignored. Elegant, and reserved, this cat is also very playful, and loves to chase after toys or sunbeams.
If your cat does appear to have a heart problem, your veterinarian may also order an ECG (electrocardiogram) to measure the rhythm and electrical activity of the heart, both of which determine the heart's ability to operate normally. If your cat's problem is in its nose or airways, a small camera called an endoscope may be used to get a closer look at these areas. These procedures are known as rhinoscopy and bronchoscopy, respectively. While your veterinarian is examining your cat with the endoscope, samples of fluid and cells may be taken for biopsic analysis.
My cat developed rapid labored respirations a week ago, the vet diagnosed lung cancer and he also had bladder infection. On xray he had consolidated whitish area with scattered crystal like areas. He was given antibiotics for infection and a steroid injection the vet said to temporary help with the breathing but he said my pet did not have long to live. He is breathing less labored and his rate fluctuates between 60-80/min. question is could this be something else instead of cancer-fungal, parasite? I do feed stray cats and even though he is mainly indoor cat I do take him out when I'm outside and he has gone under shrubs and maybe has sniffed something?
My about 8 or 9 year old cat started breathing heavily today after me and friend did some major cleaning. She was diagnosed with feline leukemia when we took her to the vet for the first time after we got her when she was about 5 months to a year as a stray. It's never bothered her at all though, she's never had an issue. She's also never breathed like this before. So I didn't know if it was because all of the dust. The dust was so bad that we had masks while we cleaned. We just thought it was the dust in the air and I've opened up all the windows to air everything out. It was also 70 something degrees outside today and she does go in and out of the house.Other than her breathing she is eating, drinking and acting completely normal. So I was just going to take her to the vet if she was still breathing like this tomorrow, but the more I search online the more nervous I get that it's not just the dust and she may have a serious issue going on.

A cats resting respiratory rate should not be above 40 breaths per minute, if the respiratory rate is above 40 breaths per minute especially if over 60 breaths per minute you should visit a Veterinarian for an examination to determine an underlying cause. An increase in respiratory rate may be due to infections, airway deformities, anaemia, lung disorders among many other causes; without examining Maisey I cannot determine a cause. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

It’s human nature to become a creature of habit. However, there’s no room for health practioners to be complacent or lack empathic best practices. Your vet (and even your own doctor) should readily give you a plan that prepares you for multiple scenarios with situational based set of instructions of what to look for and what to do if things change. That said, the patients also have the responsibility of participating in the process. This can include keeping them on point by being their supervisor, so-to-speak, during the visit and making sure they do everything they’re supposed to do.
In 1871 a Russian Blue was shown at the first cat show at the Crystal Palace in London, under the name Archangel Cat. At this point, Russian Blues were shorthaired, solid blue felines with foreign body types. From photos and published sources of the time, the original coat was thick, dense, glossy, and colored a light silver-blue. Russian Blues competed in the same class with all other shorthaired blues, despite obvious differences in type. Since the round-headed, cobby British Blues were favored in the show halls, the slender Russian Blues rarely won.
Those animals were then bred indiscriminately, and many purposely inbred for traits such as white coats, tiny size, and docile (read retarded) temperament. None of the exotic cats in wild hands can be traced back to the wild, other than local cats, cougars and bobcats, who may have been snatched from the wild in the U.S. For that reason they can never be bred for introduction back to the wild.
Aside from having a healthy diet and a healthy bathroom break, he's just a very extremely playful kitten, because he doesn't have any other symptoms after he's playing (falling over and not wanting to move after, no panting, no staggering when he walks, etc.) I don't know if I should be worried because he doesn't cry or mew or chew on any place on his body to indicate he's in any pain. And since he is still young, he hasn't been vaccinated or fixed yet, but that will happen when he's a few months older. He still has his milk teeth, which are perfect. No abnormalities or imperfections.
Thank you for your email. I'm glad that you have a scheduled appointment with Paige, as if the medications did not work, it deserves a second look. One thing that your veterinarian can do is to take an x-ray of her lungs and make sure that there is nothing to worry about there. If she isn't on heartworm prevention, a heartworm test might be a good idea as well. Without knowing the details of her situation, or being able to examine her, I can't comment more on what might be happening with her. I hope that she recovers well!
Without examining Luna it is difficult to weigh in on her conditions, the rapid breathing is concerning and is possibly due to anaemia if her gums are pale; blood counts would be a logical test to run if the gums are pale so that we would know if there really is a decrease in red blood cells as well as whether or not there is an increase in white blood cells or other tell tale signs. I understand that you’ve spent a lot already, but without examining Luna I cannot say for certain what the cause is, I would recommend visiting another clinic or a charity clinic for a better look at Luna’s symptoms. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
My cat has started so breath really shallow more rapid breaths rather than his normal breathing rate and depth. The only thing I can think of that has occurred in the last couple of hours is that my fiancé fed him along with our other two male cats some beef tendon which she has done before. The other two cats are just fine. Kingston however seems to be having a hard time taking a full breath and breathing at a normal rate. I checked his mouth and did not see anything. He isn’t active like normal and will only sit in one spot and not move. I picked him up and held him in front of his back legs and behind his front legs and he let out a slight meow as to not like that. I am not sure what to do for him. We have some allergy medicine but I do not know if that would help in any way. I couldn’t even get him to take a treat which he never turns down. Please help.
Hello, I took my 9 month old Maine Coon to the vet 2 days ago to get a couple of mats shaved. I tried and was unsuccessful. It was a very stressful event for him, it took 3 people :( He started coughing and breathing very heavy last night. He is eating well but the quick breathing and coughing is continuing. Could this be related to stress? I am scared to stress him out more by taking him in.
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