My daughters cat is mainly an inside cat but goes outside on occasion, 3 days ago she went outside to have a sniff when she spotted another cat and went bolting after it , in panic my daughter and I went running after her when we retrieved her she started vomiting up what I guessed was stomach acid due to the fact her body was not prepared or designed for that fast bolt. My daughter let her distress and calm down. Later in the evening we noticed she was still breathing very rapidly like she was when we retrieved her we thought maybe she was still highly stressed and that it may go away by morning. Morning came and I had work my daughter was looking after her cat and her condition had not changed my daughter tried feeding the cat her favourite treat ham which she usually can’t get enough of and now she ate one little bit and left the rest which is very out of character , my daughter told me this when I got home so I tired to feed the cat some dinner and she wouldn’t touch it this is when my daughter and started to feel really worried. We wanted to take her to the vet the next day but unfortunately all of them were closed due to it being a Sunday and we noticed she hadn’t used her litter and hadn’t been drinking unless my daughter fed water to her though a syringe. It is the middle of the night now when I’m writing this and she is still rapidly breathing and still hasn’t eaten for 2days please any help would be appreciated this cat is everything to my daughter thank you I hope to hear from you soon

Pulmonary thromboembolism (PTE) is a blockage in the pulmonary artery or one of its branches in the lungs that is caused by an embolism, a substance which has travelled through the circulatory system from another part of the body. The most common cause of pulmonary thromboembolism is a blood clot other causes include heartworm and a globule of fat. Blood can clot as a result of increased clotting disorders, heart disease, tumours, heartworm, polycythemia (increased red blood cells), and damage to the blood vessel walls.


Pneumonia is an infectious/inflammatory disorder of the lung parenchyma. Tiny bronchi fill the lungs; each one ends in smaller sacs known as alveoli which contain tiny blood vessels. Oxygen is added to the blood and carbon dioxide removed via the alveoli. Pneumonia causes these alveoli to fill with pus and fluids which affect the lung’s ability to exchange gases. There are several causes including infection (viral, fungal, bacterial, parasitic), aspiration of gastric contents or medications.
When the Russian Blue cat sees his favorite family member, though, it’s a whole different matter. This cat will follow the individual around the whole house and can sometimes hitch a ride on that person’s shoulder. The Foreign Blue greets the owner at the door and is sensitive to your mood, i.e., with playtime or just by settling down next to you. Owners rarely hear the cat’s voice unless it’s mealtime. Some of the things an Archangel Blue appreciates are a hearty game of fetch, a window with a great outdoor view and pats on the head.
If you’re her favorite human, be ready for nonstop love, because she is all about you, you and more you. Feeling out of sorts? She’ll stick by your side, working her healing abilities on you until you’re up and at ’em again! Prepping dinner? She’ll chill by your side, acting as taste tester. Binge-watching a new TV show? She’ll curl up by your side — just have a comb handy, as she loves being brushed while watching the tube! 

My cat has feline viral rhinotracheitis. The vet has given him steroid shots as a temporary fix but it doesn’t help much. Today I came in my house and found him breathing very hard and labored. His respiratory rate is 120, yes 120. His ears are very warm and his third eyelids are covering half of both eyes. He won’t eat. He will not respond to me when I talk to him. He has been on my sofa asleep all day.
Given the signs that you are describing for Millie, it would be best to have her seen by a veterinarian. She may have asthma, allergies, or another condition that requires treatment. Your veterinarian will be able to look at her, determine what might be going on, and recommend any testing or treatment that might be necessary. I hope that she is okay.
Without examining Luna it is difficult to weigh in on her conditions, the rapid breathing is concerning and is possibly due to anaemia if her gums are pale; blood counts would be a logical test to run if the gums are pale so that we would know if there really is a decrease in red blood cells as well as whether or not there is an increase in white blood cells or other tell tale signs. I understand that you’ve spent a lot already, but without examining Luna I cannot say for certain what the cause is, I would recommend visiting another clinic or a charity clinic for a better look at Luna’s symptoms. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

I took my senior cat Butters to the vets just a few weeks ago and the vet did just a physical exam. Said he was very healthy for a senior and looked great. Just two weeks before the appointment I had noticed he put on weight out of no where.. so since the visit I have noticed that he’s breathing very heavily and quickly and it shows in his abdominal. No panting though. I also noticed that he is purring more than usual. He was always did purr as he’s a loving and content boy, but I’ve noticed it even when I am not giving him affection and he is sitting next to me. Should I be worried at all?
The goal of breeding the Serengeti Cat is to produce a cat that resembles the wild Serval but does not contain any Serval bloodline. The first Serengeti Cat was bred by Karen Sausman in 1994 by crossing a Bengal and an Oriental Shorthair. This "foundation cat" and its progeny have been bred with many other types of cats to improve the breed—but no Servals. However, its lineage does include the Asian Leopard Cat whose genes contributed to its Bengal Cat ancestor. Serengeti Cats have long ears and long legs like a Serval, and a neck that does not taper where it meets the head. They are agile, active, and vocal. TICA classifies this cat as an advanced new breed.
Please do not ask us to sell you a kitten, nor to refer you to a broker, dealer or breeder.  These animals do not make good pets and if you have the experience and expertise to care for one for the rest of it’s life, then you should be donating your time to caring for the hundreds of unwanted ones who have ended up in real sanctuaries.  Real sanctuaries do not breed.
My cat Nala is just over a year old, two nights ago she expierienced some rapid breathing. It sounded as though she had a stuffy nose. She sounded very congested. She wasn’t panting with her mouth open but nether the less I began to worry and called an emergency 24hr Vetenarian. They told me to bring her in, so upon arriving and waiting to see a vet finally we were told that she “seemed bright and happy, her lungs sounded clear but she did have a little bit of referred upper respiratory noise”.
The domestic short-haired and domestic long-haired cat types are not breeds, but terms used (with various spellings) in the cat fancy to describe mongrel cats of a general type, by coat length, that do not belong to a particular breed. Some registries permit them to be pedigreed and they have been used as foundation stock in the establishment of some breeds. They should not be confused with standardized breeds with similar names, such as British Shorthair and Oriental Longhair.

Sorry to hear your kitty is scratching like that! Does he show any signs of skin infections, fleas, mites, wounds from other cats? The cone could have stressed him further, yes, if he was scratching already because of tension/anxiety. Open sores can get infected, especially when left untreated and scratched further. We would recommend taking your kitty to the vet for a diagnosis. They will be able to provide you the advice and medication your kitty might need. Best wishes!
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