Also known as dirofilariasis, heartworm disease (HW) is a serious parasitic infection caused by the nematode Dirofilaria immitis which lives in the pulmonary arteries, lungs, and hearts of cats. Heartworms are a type of roundworm, with adult heartworms reaching a length of 12 to 30 cm. Microfilaria (baby heartworms) are present in the blood of an infected animal (in most cases, a dog), when a female mosquito feeds on the blood, microfilaria are also ingested, once, inside the gut of the mosquito, they undergo further development before migrating to the labium (a part of the mouth) of the mosquito. When the infected mosquito feeds on another host (in this case, your cat), the larvae move from the mouthpart and onto the skin of the cat (or dog), from there, they enter the bloodstream via the bite wound left behind by the mosquito.
Without examining Midnight it is difficult to give a diagnosis since lethargy and loss of appetite are vague symptoms common with many different conditions; infections, parasites (regardless of indoor or not), foreign objects, poisoning, spoiled food, injury (fell from somewhere) among many other causes may lead to these symptoms. You should ensure that Midnight is kept hydrated, but if there is no improvement you should visit your Veterinarian for an examination. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

This is simply not true. The bad comments I have seen have only been from owner who should have not owned a cat to begin with. People who don’t have problems don’t go posting on the internet about how they don’t have issues. Just like a golden retriever or any other more athletic intelligent breed some people simple don’t match with the breed. People who buy an athletic type animal yet wont met its requirement for attention and mental stimulation.
My cat isn't eating his treats which is VERY unusual for him. He's sitting like he's uncomfortable or ready to dash. He's also making a very weird, low noise almost like an attempt at a growl or purr but it isn't quite there. I also noticed he is breathing rather quickly. The article I read here said 20-30 breaths a minute and it looks like he's doing 40 in 30 seconds. His gums don't look pale or blue. Just the normal pink. His nose is still cold too. I haven't seen blood anywhere on him or in his litter box. It also seems like he hasn't vomited at all either.
We have a 9 week old Bengal kitten that it was discovered yesterday at our vet appointment that he has a grade 4 cardiac murmur. He has been eating and moderately playing like normal. Tonight his breathing is pretty rapid - ranging from 60-80 bpm. He’s sleeping peacefully now. Anything I should do? I did call a cardiologist, but we can’t get an appointment until July and even if we could, we can’t afford the visit. Looking for help!
They appeared under the name Archangel cat and competed against other shorthair cats. Though they are a shorthaired cat breed, it is not believed that they are related in any way to other shorthaired solid blue breeds (Korat, Chartreux, and British Blue) as their coats are very different. In 1912, the GCCF (Governing Council of Cat Fancy) recognized the breed as a breed of its own and gave it its own class called Foreign Blue. The breed grew in popularity but World War II almost completely wiped out the breed. After the war, breeders set forth to revive the breed and began to outcross with other breeds. Russian Blues were mated with British Blues and blue point Siamese.
If you’re her favorite human, be ready for nonstop love, because she is all about you, you and more you. Feeling out of sorts? She’ll stick by your side, working her healing abilities on you until you’re up and at ’em again! Prepping dinner? She’ll chill by your side, acting as taste tester. Binge-watching a new TV show? She’ll curl up by your side — just have a comb handy, as she loves being brushed while watching the tube!
If you’re her favorite human, be ready for nonstop love, because she is all about you, you and more you. Feeling out of sorts? She’ll stick by your side, working her healing abilities on you until you’re up and at ’em again! Prepping dinner? She’ll chill by your side, acting as taste tester. Binge-watching a new TV show? She’ll curl up by your side — just have a comb handy, as she loves being brushed while watching the tube!
Took my 13 year old snowshoe Boss …who is always inside…to Vet ER because this morning he had no interest in food or water, just laid down, looked out of it. …and then I noticed he was breathing faster than normal, no panting or open mouth….just not the relaxed gentle breathing he usually does. Complete physical exam, said he seemed normal and if I was still worried to come back for cxr of lungs and possible blood work…but at least cxr. That was at about 10:30am…. it’s now 6:30pm…… nothing changed…still sleeping and lower chest almost abdominal area, fast breathing…prob about 60pm…… Safe to wait till morning or not? Dr didn’t seem extremely worried!? TU
This breathing may be normal for Gracie, or may be a sign of distress and not being able to get oxygen the way that she needs to. Since I cannot assess her or her respiratory system, it would be best to have her examined by a veterinarian. They'll be able to look at her, listen to her heart and lungs, and assess her general health to see if she is having any breathing issues that need attention.

I was given an Enisyl-F Pump and have been administering that every 12 hours as instructed. The cause for my question, is two days later she has began breathing in the same manner that caused me to call the Vetenarian in the first place. It began for a good ten to twenty minutes and now she’s since stopped. I’m wondering is this normal or is it serious and if so should I take her back to the emergency Vet?


The TICA Chausie breed standard allows three colors: solid black, black grizzled tabby, and black (a.k.a. brown) ticked tabby.[8] Because the Chausie breed is relatively new, Chausies are still frequently born that have a variety of other colors and patterns, and they make wonderful pets. However, only the three permissible colors are considered ideal. Only cats in the three permissible colors can be entered in new breed classes at cat shows, and only the three colors will be eligible eventually for championship classes. Gold or yellow eye color is preferred, though yellower and lighter shades of green are allowed.

Hello so my cat is around 8 years old and is a outdoor cat. He came in today and is very low energy sitting in the middle of my room on the floor which is very unusual for him. He is breathing very rapidly, and aggressively. He sometimes makes a little noise out of his mouth. So I don’t know if this is something small and I shouldn’t worry, but this is my first day of seeing this symptoms so if it continues then I’ll go see a vet.
Some cats become so congested that they are unable to breathe through their noses. When this happens, your cat may hold his mouth partway open to breathe. This is the only time that home care for heavy breathing in a cat is appropriate. You can use a cotton ball and warm water to clean any discharge off of your cat's nose. Place your cat in a humid environment such as a bathroom while running the hot water, or in front of a humidifier. If your cat is not eating, seems lethargic, or has excessive congestion, you will need to see a veterinarian for an accurate diagnosis and possible medication.
Cat sleeping all day which isn't like him at all. Once in awhile has asthma type cough gag hairball, once in awhile has tounge out and short shallow breaths. Lays long with body and neck stretched once in awhile. now he's been curled up in ball n won't move really except to lay down again or stretch. He's recently caught a mouse and bird. And month ago was sprayed in face area by a skunk. And just yesterday I noticed his back class are all split n frayed worn down. 

There is no approved adulticide (medications to kill adult heartworms) treatments for cats. Adulticides are themselves dangerous. A single dead worm can be fatal in cats as it can break away and cause a blockage of the pulmonary artery (pulmonary embolism). Heartworms in cats have a shorter lifespan than those in dogs; therefore it is preferable to manage symptoms and use a wait and see approach.
My cat (6 years old, castrated , female) for a week is showing signs of periodic but long lasting tachypnea. During the last week her breathing rate has reached 60/min ( normal 18-20/min) . Whenever she is tachypneic she is also very lethargic . Her popliteal lymph nodes are swollen and her white blood cel count ( 4,63 ) and neutrophil count (2.48) is slightly low. Abdominal ultrasound , cardiac and thoracic x rays did not show any abdonormalities ( mesenteric lymph nodes heart and lungs were normal ). Biochemical blood work results where normal . She is FeLV and FIV negative. She is also suffering from diarrhea and frequent urination ( 6 times daily)
There is no approved adulticide (medications to kill adult heartworms) treatments for cats. Adulticides are themselves dangerous. A single dead worm can be fatal in cats as it can break away and cause a blockage of the pulmonary artery (pulmonary embolism). Heartworms in cats have a shorter lifespan than those in dogs; therefore it is preferable to manage symptoms and use a wait and see approach.
Regardless, you should visit your Veterinarian or an Emergency Veterinarian to examine Gizmo since she should be eating and drinking normally after this routine surgery and the ‘seizure like’ activity is also concerning; the moderate increase in respiration may be due to discomfort from surgery or due to something more serious. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
The CFA describes the Foreign Blue as “having a medium-sized, smooth wedge for a head with a muzzle that’s short and blunt.” The flatness of the head and its wedge-shaped appearance can be likened to that of a cobra. At the head protrudes wide ears having a pointed tip. The eyes are wide-set and has a bright green tint. Overall, the eyes give the Foreign Blue a sweet expression that perfectly matches the breed’s outstandingly gentle temperament.
There are many different causes for an increase in respiration rate which may include pain, respiratory tract infection, parasites, tumours, anaemia, heart disease, pulmonary edema, poisoning, allergies among other causes; without examining Petey and diving into the case I cannot think of a specific cause. If the faeces are greasy I would look at changing the food to another brand and stick with a kibble over a wet food and look for any improvement. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
Thank you for your email. I do think that there might be more going on than stress, and kittens are prone to infectious diseases. If you don't trust that veterinarian that you saw, it would be a good idea to find a second opinion, even if you have to travel a bit to do so, as he could have a problem that needs to be treated. You can also call your veterinarian, let them know that he isn't getting better, and see if they have any other recommendations for him.
Tabbies: Tabby cats constitute the oldest and most common pattern seen and are one of the most popular. They are easily differentiated by their stripes, whorls, and spots ( the latter generally found on their tummies). Striped tabbies are often referred to as "tiger," for obvious reasons. They are also known as "mackerel tabbies." The round bulls-eye marking on the sides of a tabby identifies it as a "classic" tabby. While spotted tabbies sometimes crop up in "barn cats," they are also found in breeds, such as the Ocicat and the American Bobtail. Tabbies may also wear white "accessories," such as a bib, vest, or "boots." Thus, they could be described as "tabby with white."

My cat isn't eating his treats which is VERY unusual for him. He's sitting like he's uncomfortable or ready to dash. He's also making a very weird, low noise almost like an attempt at a growl or purr but it isn't quite there. I also noticed he is breathing rather quickly. The article I read here said 20-30 breaths a minute and it looks like he's doing 40 in 30 seconds. His gums don't look pale or blue. Just the normal pink. His nose is still cold too. I haven't seen blood anywhere on him or in his litter box. It also seems like he hasn't vomited at all either.
If your cat is suffering from shock or pain as a result of trauma, if no broken bones are detected your vet will often take a conservative approach and allow your cat to be released to go home with a prescription for pain medication. You will need to provide a safe, warm and quiet place for your cat to heal and recover. Allergies will be treated with antihistamines and ongoing medication dosage in the case of seasonal or non acute reactions. 
My cat (8-9 months) just got spayed 2 days ago. I have another cat so to be sure the wound was safe we got her a vest instead of a cone. she came home that afternoon and she was very quiet and would not walk around, we thought it was normal due to the vest and anesthesia. yesterday we noticed she isn't eating, drinking or going to the litterbox on her own. she only wants to lay down and sleep. If we bring her to the water, food, and litter box she'll do her things and just lay down again. we kept thinking she was just tired or did not like to walk with the vest so we went to sleep this morning o notice she is not in her bed but inside the transporter box, and breathing quite fast. My boyfriend took her to the vet, to do an X-ray and they said she had some pulmonary infection but they can't do the necessary tests to pinpoint exactly what is the issue because it requires anesthesia and she just had one a few days ago. they gave her some medicine bt it did not work and they are moving her to the vet hospital so she can have someone with her during the night. should I be worried, will she be ok?

Hi, My cat fell from our 3rd floor window 1 month ago. Hopefully i found him immediately and brought her to the vet. She had her mouth bleeding. The vet did an injection and xrayed her. She only had a palate wound, but the vet said that it was mostly on the hard palate and that she doesn’t need any stitches if she eats normally. Luckily when we got back home she immediately ate, drank water and went to the toilet. I want to think everything went back to normal but sometimes i find her breathing very fast, today she even panted when we were playing around and also i notice her sometimes blinking only one eye. When i asked our vet she says if the cat has a problem with her lungs she would breath rapidly all the time and not just sometimes. She said everything should be fine. But i am still worried, should i be?


Also known as dirofilariasis, heartworm disease (HW) is a serious parasitic infection caused by the nematode Dirofilaria immitis which lives in the pulmonary arteries, lungs, and hearts of cats. Heartworms are a type of roundworm, with adult heartworms reaching a length of 12 to 30 cm. Microfilaria (baby heartworms) are present in the blood of an infected animal (in most cases, a dog), when a female mosquito feeds on the blood, microfilaria are also ingested, once, inside the gut of the mosquito, they undergo further development before migrating to the labium (a part of the mouth) of the mosquito. When the infected mosquito feeds on another host (in this case, your cat), the larvae move from the mouthpart and onto the skin of the cat (or dog), from there, they enter the bloodstream via the bite wound left behind by the mosquito.
Four of the five species of the big cats (the Panthera genus – lion, tiger, leopard, jaguar and snow leopard), the exception being the snow leopard can hybridize with each other to produce numerous hybrids. In fact, breeding of two different pantheras to produce hybrid big cats has been banned in many zoos and animal sanctuaries due to no conservation value of the hybrid, and the risk it poses on the mother that gives birth to it. 

Rapid breathing (tachypnea) is a respiratory disorder characterised by abnormal breathing that is rapid and shallow.  It is caused by a reduced level of oxygen, mechanical disorders (where the lungs aren’t able to expand as they should, usually due to a build-up of fluid in or around the lungs), and physiological disorders in which the cat’s respiratory centre in the brain is over stimulated.
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