The most commonly held theory regarding this breed’s origin is that Russian Blues were brought to Great Britain in 1860 by British sailors from the White Sea port town of Archangel (Arkhangelsk) in northern Russia. Whether this story is true—and if true, whether the cats really originated in that area—is anyone’s guess. Their thick coats give credence to the theory that they developed in a cold climate, and, according to accounts, blue shorthairs still exist in Russia.
It’s a good idea to keep a Russian Blue as an indoor-only cat to protect him from diseases spread by other cats, attacks by dogs or coyotes, and the other dangers that face cats who go outdoors, such as being hit by a car. Russian Blues who go outdoors also run the risk of being stolen by someone who would like to have such a beautiful cat without paying for it.

I cannot legally recommend the use of antibiotics in a cat I haven’t examined; also I don’t know the dosage of the penicillin, what the inert ingredients are in that batch, whether it is expired, has been stored correctly etc… You should try to clean Jazzy’s lip with a dilute antiseptic and ensure she remains hydrated, you should also visit an Emergency Veterinarian if one is open near to you for an examination and pain relief. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
By 1965, British breeders expressed unhappiness over the abrupt change in the Russian Blue's shape and personality, and immediately began an effort to bring back the original Russian Blue. By breeding the Scandinavian cats, known for their good head type and vivid green eye color, with the British Russian Blues, a cat with a silver-blue coat color and graceful body style, the breeders finally achieved what they were looking for.
Without examining Midnight it is difficult to give a diagnosis since lethargy and loss of appetite are vague symptoms common with many different conditions; infections, parasites (regardless of indoor or not), foreign objects, poisoning, spoiled food, injury (fell from somewhere) among many other causes may lead to these symptoms. You should ensure that Midnight is kept hydrated, but if there is no improvement you should visit your Veterinarian for an examination. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
Thank you for you email. unfortunately, without examining Kai, i can't comment on what might be going on with him. He needs to see his veterinarian to try and determine what is going on with him and how to treat him. If he seems to be in distress and unable to catch his breath, taking him to the emergency clinic tonight is most appropriate. I hope that he is okay.
These cats have some serious staying power. Hailing from Siberia, this breed was first referenced all the way back in 1000 A.D., according to TICA. Powerful, intelligent and entertaining best describe the Siberian, which frequently takes problem-solving (like opening doors) into their own paws. Their semi-long coat is thick in the winter to withstand the elements and becomes shorter and lighter in the warmer months.
He is not lethargic and doesn't have laboured breathing and doesn't pant when he does. He breathes well through his nose. When he washes himself, it's the normal kind. There are no abnormal bites or scratches when he does. My calculated guess is that it's normal for a kitten his age to be as active as he is? He gets the proper nutrition and he does drink kitten milk. Could that be a factor? I keep my eye on his breathing state when he sleeps on me.

There are many different causes for the symptoms which you are describing which most likely are attributable to an infection; continue with the antibiotics and feed some plain canned pumpkin to help move the bowels a little, if Teddy isn’t drinking you should try syringing water to the mouth little by little as it is important he remains hydrated. See how he goes, but if there is no improvement you should return to your Veterinarian for another examination. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
If your cat is struggling to breath and is not eating or moving, it could be a sign of trauma in cats. A steep fall, collision or dog attack can result in internal injuries, which can affect your cats lung capacity. An internal hemorrhage, intense pain, fractures or pneumothorax constitute as emergencies that can cause fast, superficial abdominal breathing in cats.

While oxygen is being transferred to the red blood cells, carbon dioxide is transferred from the red blood cells into the lungs. It is then carried out through the nose through a process referred to as expiration. This cyclic motion of breathing is controlled by the respiratory center in the brain and nerves in the chest. Diseases that affect the respiratory system, or the respiratory center in the brain, can bring about breathing difficulties. Troubled or labored breathing is medically referred to as dyspnea, and excessively rapid breathing is medically referred to as tachypnea (also, polypnea).
HELLO . I HAVE SEALPOINT HIMALAYAN CAT AND HIS NAME IS CHOCO. I ALWAYS OBSERVE HIS BREATHING AND IT LOOK LIKE HIS SNOORING ALL THE TIME ESPECIALLY WHEN HE IS ASLEEP. I ALSO NOTICE THAT EVERYTIME HE GOES TO SLEEP, HE ALWAYS PUT HIS HEAD ON A PILLOW OR LOOKING UP IN THE CEILING. I ALSO FEEL THERE IS A SMALL CIRCLE AROUND HIS THROAT WHEN I TOUCH IT. I WAS SO DEEPLY BROKE EVERYTIME I THINK ABOUT MY LITTLE CHOCO's CONDITION . DO YOU HAVE ANY IDEAS ABOUT MY CONCERN? THIS WILL BE A BIG HELP FOR ME MY FRIEND. THANK YOU SO MUCH !!!!
The Russian Blue made his first appearance on the world stage of the cat fancy at an exhibit of cats held at London’s Crystal Palace in 1875. Labeled an Archangel Cat, because he was said to be from the Russian island of Archangel, he competed against other blue cats of varying types. A newspaper report of the show described the Russian Blue as “very handsome” and “particularly furry,” adding “They resemble mostly the common wild grey rabbit.” Other early names by which the breed was known were Maltese and Foreign Blue.

We receive requests every week from people who are looking for some place to take their “pet” cat.  Each year we have to turn away more than 100 such “pets“.  These unwitting owners have discovered that all exotic cats, both male and female, neutered or not, spray and bite when they reach sexual maturity.  (They don’t just spray a little either.  We are talking about buckets of the foulest smelling urine, all over your house, your things and you. If you don’t believe me, watch this clip of a neutered lion HERE)  Moving them out to the yard means your neighbors will soon be complaining that your place smells like a zoo.   By the time they find us they have discovered that the zoos do not want their animals, that no one is willing to buy them and that they can’t even give them away.  Refuges are usually full to capacity and cannot take in another hungry mouth to feed.  All too often, these “pets” are turned out to fend for themselves, where they surely die of starvation or are euthanized.

Aside from having a healthy diet and a healthy bathroom break, he's just a very extremely playful kitten, because he doesn't have any other symptoms after he's playing (falling over and not wanting to move after, no panting, no staggering when he walks, etc.) I don't know if I should be worried because he doesn't cry or mew or chew on any place on his body to indicate he's in any pain. And since he is still young, he hasn't been vaccinated or fixed yet, but that will happen when he's a few months older. He still has his milk teeth, which are perfect. No abnormalities or imperfections.
If your cat is suffering from shock or pain as a result of trauma, if no broken bones are detected your vet will often take a conservative approach and allow your cat to be released to go home with a prescription for pain medication. You will need to provide a safe, warm and quiet place for your cat to heal and recover. Allergies will be treated with antihistamines and ongoing medication dosage in the case of seasonal or non acute reactions. 
Hello, so after I had a party at my house a few days ago, my cat has been very weak, sleeping all the time, won't eat or drink as much as he used to, and breathing rapidly. I tried bringing him to a vet a couple of days ago and they said it was only stress due to the loud music and crowds from the party, and they told me to give him liquid food along with vitamins every hour for a few days. I've done that for a couple of days but it seems like my cat's breathing actually had gotten more shallow and heavy. I'm afraid that the vet misdiagnosed my cat (I don't trust the credibility of that vet, since they're not the one I'm used to go to), do you think there's anything more than just stress? Also if it helps, he's just gotten his first vaccination around last week. Thank you
Below are some zoos and pseudo sanctuaries in Florida.  These places breed and sell while lying to the public and saying they are doing it for conservation.  The file is large, so you may have to wait a bit for it to load fully and then hit play again. These are the ones that are open to the public. Many are much worse, but do not allow the public in to film.
Ligers enjoy swimming, which is a characteristic of tigers, and are very sociable like lions. Ligers (and tigons) exist only in captivity because the habitats of the parental species do not overlap in the wild. Historically, when the Asiatic Lion was prolific, the territories of lions and tigers did overlap and there are legends of ligers existing in the wild.
During this same time, Scandinavian breeders crossed similar looking blue coated cats from Finland with Siamese cats. The cats had emerald green eyes. Russian Blues made their way to North America in the early 1900s but it took some time for breeding programs to begin in North America. The first Russian Blue was not registered with the CFA until 1949. In 1964, GC Maja Acre Igor II, a Russian Blue, won CFA Grand Champion. In 1965, British breeders began to express concern over the evolving appearance of the Russian Blue cat breed. Russian Blues were bred with the similar looking Scandinavian cats that had beautiful emerald eyes and the Russian Blue look and personality that was desired was finally achieved.
A loss of appetite and lethargy are both vague symptoms but the rapid breathing is concerning, you should visit your Veterinarian for an examination as rapid breathing may be associated with pain, anaemia, heart disease among many other conditions. Without examining Ozzy I cannot determine the specific underlying cause of the symptoms and would recommend that a visit to your Veterinarian be made before the weekend. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
As with so many cat breeds, little is known of the Russian Blue’s origins. He probably does come from Russia—his thick coat is surely that of a cat from colder climes—and he is considered a natural breed, meaning Matushka Nature created him, not the handiwork of humans. The Russian Blue’s development as a breed, however, took place primarily in Britain and Scandinavia, starting in the late nineteenth century, when showing and breeding cats became a popular activity.

This semi-long-haired feline is native to Norway, according to the Cat Fancier’s Association, and everything it does, it does when it’s good and ready.  (You got that?) They’re described as sensitive, social and friendly but on their own terms. Despite their outdoorsy name, they’re quite happy inside but do require a scratching post and cat tree — preferably with an outdoor view — to keep them stimulated.

It’s a good idea to keep a Russian Blue as an indoor-only cat to protect him from diseases spread by other cats, attacks by dogs or coyotes, and the other dangers that face cats who go outdoors, such as being hit by a car. Russian Blues who go outdoors also run the risk of being stolen by someone who would like to have such a beautiful cat without paying for it.
A stray cat showed up at my house a couple days ago. She is very thin and I've started her on small throughout the day. She is eating, drinking, voiding, and stooling okay. Eyes, ears, and nose are all clear. The only major thing I've noticed is rapid breathing when purring or stress (loud noises make her skittish). I have pets of my own and really cannot afford a costly vet visit, and our local shelter and a rescue are overwhelmed with companion animals at this time. I've started her on antibiotics and am keeping her isolated from my own pets. My daughter has asthma and this looks very similar. Any advice? I've found out that her previous owner passed away and a neighbour tried to bring her to her house, the cat bolted and they couldn't find her, 3 weeks later she showed up at my place. She is a spayed 5 year old female who was up to date on shots.
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