One important note to keep in mind with this breed is its love of food. It will eat beyond its need and ask for seconds, making it a sure candidate for weight related conditions if it is allowed to eat as much as it wants. The best prevention is measuring the food and giving it only at assigned times of the day, and making sure that everyone in the house knows that they cannot give the cat too many treats or scraps.
As the CFA further explains, the Russian blue cat made its first public appearance in 1875 in a very regal way: exhibited at London's Crystal Palace as the "Archangel Cat." The Crystal Palace was constructed under the leadership of Prince Albert, husband of Queen Victoria, as the location of The Great Exhibition in 1851 and thereafter was used to exhibit items of interest (living and otherwise) to the people of Victorian London, and the attractions held international appeal as well. By middle of the nineteenth century, "cat shows" had become regular and popular events.

Tri-color Cats: Because of the associated genetic factors that create their color patterns, tri-color cats almost always are female, although occasional males crop up (about one in 3,000, according to this excellent article by Barbara French) Those rare males are almost always sterile, also for reasons of genetics, so don't expect to gain a fortune by selling your male calico cat.
Tabbies: Tabby cats constitute the oldest and most common pattern seen and are one of the most popular. They are easily differentiated by their stripes, whorls, and spots ( the latter generally found on their tummies). Striped tabbies are often referred to as "tiger," for obvious reasons. They are also known as "mackerel tabbies." The round bulls-eye marking on the sides of a tabby identifies it as a "classic" tabby. While spotted tabbies sometimes crop up in "barn cats," they are also found in breeds, such as the Ocicat and the American Bobtail. Tabbies may also wear white "accessories," such as a bib, vest, or "boots." Thus, they could be described as "tabby with white."
My 13 months old cat is breathing heavily and panting like a dog after only a minute or two of playing and jumping.. is it normal? I’m worried😟he is also no longer eating well for the last 2 months. He seemed to have lost his appetite. He will only eat if I add some treats in his foods but still will only eat a little bit. My cat never drink water since he came to us last year in August he will only drink milk, but now he rarely drink his milk.. I’m afraid he will be dehydrated so I gave him milk using the syringe.. his diet is wet food and he does eat a little of dry food only at night when he is hungry as I always leave dry foods for him to nibble at night.. is my cat sick?
In 1912 the Foreign Blue, one of the breed’s early names, warranted their own class and finally got separated from the blue cats variety. Progress of the cat’s popularity was halted, with the breed coming dangerously close to extinction during the onset of World War II. Breeders tried to revive the line by crossing the Russian Blue to Bluepoint Siamese and British Blues. Scandinavian breeders tried the same using Finland blue cats and Siamese blues.
Causes for an increase in respiratory rate may include pain, infections, heart disease, respiratory tract obstruction, increased temperature among others; a cat’s resting respiratory rate shouldn’t be higher than around 40 breaths per minute, if it is higher than this then I would advise you visit your Veterinarian for an examination to determine the underlying cause. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
Sharleen ear temperature change hot to cold 4 times overnight. Sound stuffy when purr. Breath heavily and urinate lots and often last few weeks. Took her to the vet for blood work and check up today. She seem worse and in pain. Lower lip is now swollen, right front leg a little limping. Not active all afternoon. Night fall and she seem restless. What can I do to ease her pain while waiting for blood work result?
Thank you for your email. That doesn't sound like normal behavior, and animals, like people, can have clotting issues after a major surgery like that. Whether it is pain, or whether it is something else, he should probably be reassessed today by your veterinarian. They'll be able to check his pulses, and his breathing, and prescribe him more pain medications if he is in that much pain. I hope that he is okay.
A cats resting respiratory rate should not be above 40 breaths per minute, if the respiratory rate is above 40 breaths per minute especially if over 60 breaths per minute you should visit a Veterinarian for an examination to determine an underlying cause. An increase in respiratory rate may be due to infections, airway deformities, anaemia, lung disorders among many other causes; without examining Maisey I cannot determine a cause. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
Treatment of rapid breathing in your cat will be tailored to the specific cause of the condition. In the case of infections, pneumonia, or fluid filling the lungs, your vet will prescribe strong antibiotics to help fight off the infections. In many cases, your cat may need to be hospitalized so that they can be provided round the clock supportive care such as fluids, IV antibiotics, and administration of oxygen.

Cat sleeping all day which isn't like him at all. Once in awhile has asthma type cough gag hairball, once in awhile has tounge out and short shallow breaths. Lays long with body and neck stretched once in awhile. now he's been curled up in ball n won't move really except to lay down again or stretch. He's recently caught a mouse and bird. And month ago was sprayed in face area by a skunk. And just yesterday I noticed his back class are all split n frayed worn down.
As with all non-domestic hybrid source breeds, some Chausies may inherit intestinal tracts similar to that of the non-domestic ancestors. The intestinal tract may be a little shorter than that of the traditional domestic cat. A shorter intestinal tract is thought to be less capable of processing ingredients derived from plants. That would include any kind of cereal, as well as vegetables, herbs, and spices. Those ingredients may serve as triggers for chronic intestinal inflammation and eventually lead to chronic inflammatory bowel disease that is perpetuated by multiple allergies to proteins in commercial cat food.[9] Regardless of the cause, Chausies do seem somewhat prone to developing food allergies. To prevent this, breeders advise Chausie owners to feed only very high quality commercial cat foods, containing as little of plant-derived ingredients as possible or advise feeding homemade raw or cooked meat diets with appropriate supplementation. If homemade diets are fed, it should be with the guidance of someone experienced in preparing them, because meat by itself does not contain all the nutrients that Chausies require.
Thank you for your email. Since Tortie was just seen by your veterinarian and was deemed healthy, her periodic bouts of rapid breathing may be normal, and may follow bouts of exertion or anxiety. If the periods that she is breathing rapidly become more frequent, or more severe, it would be a good idea to have her seen by your veterinarian and examined to make sure that she is okay. It might be helpful to video the episode, since she doesn't seem to breathe that way when she is at an appointment. I hope that she is okay!

There are many different causes for rapid breathing in cats which may include pain, respiratory infection, heart failure among other causes. Without an examination and thorough auscultation of the chest, I cannot say what the cause is or the best course of treatment; anytime resting respiratory rate is over 40 breaths per minute, you should visit your Veterinarian as soon as possible. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM


My cat seems to have rapid breathing, I can see her stomach area rising and falling as she sleeps. I tried to take her breathing rate and got 60-65 per minute. She is grooming herself more than usual. She has always been skittish, her eating is normal, and she has had normal bladder and bowel functions. I have a hard time getting her into a carrier so I do not take her to the vet often. I am in an area that is getting prepared for a powerful nor'easter, so I can't get her to a vet for a few days. Should I be worried? What can I do?

My cat is approx 18yrs old & had 4 seizures a couple of weeks ago. Vet ran bloods & said nothing found just white cells up a little. Gave Noroclav 50 for week, no fits since but breathing very fast and hard, can’t get comfy & struggles moving about just sleeps a lot. Little food & water. If walks it’s very slow. Lost weight and ribs are poking out.
Lethargy and increased respiratory rate are not specific symptoms as they are shared with many conditions; however I’m concerned that they are a common sign that an animal is in pain, but without examining Marilyn I cannot say whether she is in pain or there is another cause for the symptoms. You should visit your Veterinarian for an examination to be on the safe side especially if this has been going on for a day or more. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
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