If Squeakers is acting normally otherwise and doesn't seem to be having any respiratory distress, this may just be normal for her. If she hasn't had a checkup in a while, it would be a good idea to have her checked out, regardless, as a veterinarian can listen to her heart and lungs, and assess her general health and whether this breathing pattern is normal, or a potential problem. I hope that all goes well for her!
^ "Colorpoint Longhair" has multiple meanings and "Javanese" has been used for at least one other breed; the WCF uses the "Javanese" name for the Oriental Longhair (not colorpointed). The WCF has also merged the colorpointed Javanese/Colorpoint Longhair, the Himalayan and the Colourpoint Shorthair of other registries into a single breed, the Colourpoint. In the CFA, the TICA and some other registries, the Javanese/Colorpoint Longhair has merged back into the Balinese as a division

I cannot think of a connection between the running after another cat and the symptoms that she is presenting with except possibly hypoglycemia (normally causes an increase in appetite) due to the blood glucose level being too low. I would suggest to rub a little corn syrup or honey on the gums to see if there is any improvement in Cupcake’s symptoms; ensure you keep Cupcake hydrated and visit your Veterinarian on Monday morning, if the symptoms increase in severity visit an Emergency Veterinarian. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM


The Russian Blue made his first appearance on the world stage of the cat fancy at an exhibit of cats held at London’s Crystal Palace in 1875. Labeled an Archangel Cat, because he was said to be from the Russian island of Archangel, he competed against other blue cats of varying types. A newspaper report of the show described the Russian Blue as “very handsome” and “particularly furry,” adding “They resemble mostly the common wild grey rabbit.” Other early names by which the breed was known were Maltese and Foreign Blue.
There are various different causes for rapid breathing and rapid heart rate which may be caused by stress, poisoning, infections, anaemia, heart disease among many other conditions; if there are behavioural changes like hiding there may be fear or another similar component. Without examining Wagamama I cannot say whether or not there is a cause for concern or not, but you should have your Veterinarian check her over to be on the safe side. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
Your cat’s health is of the utmost importance, and at some point, most owners are faced with a confusing medical issue they must confront. Do cat’s normally breathe fast? Yes but only in very specific conditions. If you’ve found yourself looking at your furry friend and wondering “My cat is breathing fast – what should I do?” your next step is to make an informed decision of how to react to this respiratory difficulty.
My cat isn't eating his treats which is VERY unusual for him. He's sitting like he's uncomfortable or ready to dash. He's also making a very weird, low noise almost like an attempt at a growl or purr but it isn't quite there. I also noticed he is breathing rather quickly. The article I read here said 20-30 breaths a minute and it looks like he's doing 40 in 30 seconds. His gums don't look pale or blue. Just the normal pink. His nose is still cold too. I haven't seen blood anywhere on him or in his litter box. It also seems like he hasn't vomited at all either.
Causes for an increase in respiratory rate may include pain, infections, heart disease, respiratory tract obstruction, increased temperature among others; a cat’s resting respiratory rate shouldn’t be higher than around 40 breaths per minute, if it is higher than this then I would advise you visit your Veterinarian for an examination to determine the underlying cause. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
Breeding of Russian Blues took a lot of years and tweaking as many breeders had different preferences as to what exactly they thought the Russian Blue should be like. The breed became very varied and finally, North American breeders began to import Russian Blues from Britain and the breed began to stabilize. Russian Blues are known for their skittish, shy personalities and struggled to perform in cat shows. This problem led to a decline in popularity but breeders worked hard to carefully cultivate the desired personality and, since the 1990s, Russian Blues have done much better in cat shows and have become much more popular among fanciers.
Don’t let the powerful, sleek features of the Foreign Blue fool you. This breed is generally shy, quiet and very gentle by nature. It’s more reserved than playful but that doesn’t mean the breed enjoys a good romp every now and then. The Russian Blue is intelligent and leans towards games that have a “throw and catch” mechanism. You’ll soon find yourself playing an endless game of fetch if you’re not careful! They are also attracted by sunbeams, laser pointers and love to go chase their favorite toys.
Give your Foreign Blue an adequate diet in the form of premium, dry cat food. You can spoil your cat from time to time and give him canned food that’s rich in protein. As they get older, dietary requirements may change, so it’s best to consult with a veterinarian for recommendations. When it’s time to change food, remember to add the new food gradually and mix it in the old one in the span of a few weeks or so. Make the transition too fast and your cat may get an upset tummy.
If your cat is breathing heavily while resting, it can be a sign of several common problems from anxiety to airway disease. Understanding some of the reasons for labored breathing in cats can help you assess the severity of the situation. However, if your cat is having difficulty breathing, this is an emergency, and you should take your cat to your veterinarian right away.
In the late 1890s/early 1900s, two hybrids were born in Chicago, USA, followed 2 years later by three sets of twin cubs born at a zoo in Hamburg, Germany from a puma father and leopard mother. Carl Hagenbeck apparently bred several litters of puma x leopard hybrids in 1898 at the suggestion of a menagerie owner in Britain; this was possibly Lord Rothschild (as one of the hybrids is preserved in his museum) who may have heard of the two hybrid cubs bred in Chicago in 1896 and suggested Hagenbeck reproduced the pairing.
Sounds like extra fluid. My feline leukemia positive cat was belly breathing about 50 times a minute. I rushed him to the vet who said he had a hemo thorax and removed 200ml frothy blood. He had a tumor that was leaking and compressing lungs. He layed stretched out or up on his elbows. If your cat is belly breathing and breathing upwards of >30 minute-run to the vet! Sadly I put my baby to sleep that day. I had another cat with CHF (congestive heart failure) was treatable with meds. SHe lived a year.
If Mya started panting after playing suddenly, that may be a sign that something might be wrong. If is has been hotter than normal, and suddenly, that might explain the panting. It is difficult to say without the ultrasound whether she has a problem or not, unfortunately. She seems quite healthy otherwise, but if the panting is a dramatic change, having the ultrasound will let you know what is going on with her.
The Russian Blue can spend hours amusing itself and does not mind an awful lot if it is left at home alone for the day, but it will be very happy to see you when you do arrive. This cat makes for an excellent companion, constantly following its owners about, and generally preferring one human above all others in the family. It should be added that the Russian Blue gets along with most everyone, including children. Their love of human company extends to impishly clowning to help calm a crying baby, and showing sympathy when their people get the blues by patting the face of the person.
Class clown — there’s always one! Purina notes that these confident and friendly creatures stand out because of their clowning around. These short-tailed cats, who were bred in the U.S. starting in the 1960s, according to TICA, make a great family pet since they’re sociable with humans of all ages and even other friends of the four-legged variety. They’re all about fun — but aren’t in need of your undivided attention — and don’t tend to attach themselves to one person.  

11 month old kitten with rapid breathing since we got him at 3 months old. Acting normal, voiding without issue, playing, eating and drinking. Normal behaviors. As a nurse myself I always questioned his fast breathing but because he is a kitten I let it slide thinking that maybe they, like babies/children have faster respiratory rates. He is half tabby half Maine coon and is about 12-13lbs. His respiratory rate at rest is about 75-85. He has only panted about 3 times that we’ve seen during intense play time with our other cat. No coughing or runny nose. I’m very worried now that he is approaching a year old. I’ve been through the ringer with expensive tests at the vet with another cat and I’m wondering what are the baseline tests for this that I can start with that could lead to answers? And what are the most common diagnosises with rapid breathing being the only symptom? Thoughts and many thanks in advance!
Inconsistency in breed classification and naming among registries means that an individual animal may be considered different breeds by different registries (though not necessarily eligible for registry in them all, depending on its exact ancestry). For example, the TICA's Himalayan is considered a colorpoint variety of the Persian by the CFA, while the Javanese (or Colorpoint Longhair) is a color variation of the Balinese in the TICA and the CFA; both breeds are merged (along with the Colorpoint Shorthair) into a single "mega-breed", the Colourpoint, in the World Cat Federation (WCF), who have repurposed the name "Javanese" for the Oriental Longhair. Also, "Colo[u]rpoint Longhair" refers to multiple different breeds in some other registries. There are several examples of nomenclatural confusion of this sort. Furthermore, many geographical and cultural names for cat breeds are fanciful selections made by Western breeders to be "exotic"-sounding and bear no relationship to the actual origin of the breeds;[4] the Balinese, Javanese, and Himalayan are all examples of this trend.
Hi, My cat fell from our 3rd floor window 1 month ago. Hopefully i found him immediately and brought her to the vet. She had her mouth bleeding. The vet did an injection and xrayed her. She only had a palate wound, but the vet said that it was mostly on the hard palate and that she doesn’t need any stitches if she eats normally. Luckily when we got back home she immediately ate, drank water and went to the toilet. I want to think everything went back to normal but sometimes i find her breathing very fast, today she even panted when we were playing around and also i notice her sometimes blinking only one eye. When i asked our vet she says if the cat has a problem with her lungs she would breath rapidly all the time and not just sometimes. She said everything should be fine. But i am still worried, should i be?
Russian Blues have a tolerant nature toward children who treat them kindly and respectfully. They will even put up with the clumsy pats given by toddlers, as if they recognize that no harm is meant, and if necessary they will walk away or climb out of reach to escape being bonked on the head. That said, the patient and gentle Russian Blue should always be protected from rough treatment, so always supervise very young children when they want to pet the cat.

The CFA describes the Foreign Blue as “having a medium-sized, smooth wedge for a head with a muzzle that’s short and blunt.” The flatness of the head and its wedge-shaped appearance can be likened to that of a cobra. At the head protrudes wide ears having a pointed tip. The eyes are wide-set and has a bright green tint. Overall, the eyes give the Foreign Blue a sweet expression that perfectly matches the breed’s outstandingly gentle temperament.
Russian Blues are very intelligent. My female knows commands and obeys. If I say no she responds with a quiet meow but obeys. My male is the most affectionate cat I have ever had while my female decides when she is to be loved. She sits on my shoulder while I put on makeup and knows how to signal me to bend over so she can jump onto high places like the top of an armoire or top shelf of the closet. Love this breed and are very loyal and clean cats.
I hope that you can help me At school my granddaughter is currently (she is 8) working on wild cats. I have volunteered to make her a book of photographs and information on cats through the alphabet. There are two that I have not been able to find (hours on Google) V & X I was wondering if someone can help on a name (or Latin) for an obscure feline or subspecies. I think I will have to give up on the X but I’ve bent the rules a bit and will use Xausted and shown a lion sleeping in… Read more »

Treating a wild cat as a pet is not a good idea, but throughout history, some have taken servals, caracals, fishing cats, ocelots, and even lions and tigers into their homes. The desire to own a wild animal can have consequences, so cat breeders have used their skills to develop cat breeds that fulfill the desire for an exotic cat without the danger.


Sharleen ear temperature change hot to cold 4 times overnight. Sound stuffy when purr. Breath heavily and urinate lots and often last few weeks. Took her to the vet for blood work and check up today. She seem worse and in pain. Lower lip is now swollen, right front leg a little limping. Not active all afternoon. Night fall and she seem restless. What can I do to ease her pain while waiting for blood work result?
Breathing rates may change for a variety of reasons and in some sleeping positions the airway may be slightly occluded which may result in altered breathing but without examining Kiki I cannot say for certain whether it is something to be concerned about or not. As for drinking, some cats may drink less that are on a wet food diet but you should ensure that she is keeping hydrated; you should visit your Veterinarian for a general check about the breathing and they can also check the hydration too. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
Causes for an increase in respiratory rate may include pain, infections, heart disease, respiratory tract obstruction, increased temperature among others; a cat’s resting respiratory rate shouldn’t be higher than around 40 breaths per minute, if it is higher than this then I would advise you visit your Veterinarian for an examination to determine the underlying cause. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
He purrs all the time and loves to play. His lips and nose are a nice pink as well as his tongue. His inner eyelids are fine. His eyes are only wide when he's ready to play. When he sleeps in a certain position, his heart rate is higher than normal, but when he sleeps in a different position, he breathes fast, over 40 breaths per minute. When I feel his heart, it's always beating fast but that's because he is very active and loves to play. When he sleeps in a different position, usually curled up, his breathing and heart rate are fine. Usually the rapid breathing is when his head is back, but he quickly wakes up to change position to become more comfortable. He normally plays for an hour or so, becomes tired, then goes to sleep.
Calico: Separate solid blocks of color, which must include red (orange), black, and white. They also may have blocks of tabby pattern, which produces an extremely colorful and beautiful cat. Dilute calicos, have the same separate blocks of color, only the colors are "diluted," i.e. "faded" shades of the original, which gives them an ethereal appearance. A dilute calico will have pale orange or buff for the red, and gray (or "blue") for the black.
Pulmonary thromboembolism (PTE) is a blockage in the pulmonary artery or one of its branches in the lungs that is caused by an embolism, a substance which has travelled through the circulatory system from another part of the body. The most common cause of pulmonary thromboembolism is a blood clot other causes include heartworm and a globule of fat. Blood can clot as a result of increased clotting disorders, heart disease, tumours, heartworm, polycythemia (increased red blood cells), and damage to the blood vessel walls.
While oxygen is being transferred to the red blood cells, carbon dioxide is transferred from the red blood cells into the lungs. It is then carried out through the nose through a process referred to as expiration. This cyclic motion of breathing is controlled by the respiratory center in the brain and nerves in the chest. Diseases that affect the respiratory system, or the respiratory center in the brain, can bring about breathing difficulties. Troubled or labored breathing is medically referred to as dyspnea, and excessively rapid breathing is medically referred to as tachypnea (also, polypnea).
Big cats can be made to sit by either right-clicking on the ground or on the big cat with a whip. When stationary, they will not move. You can toggle between them sitting and moving around by right-clicking the ground or the cat with a whip again. A player cannot mount a saddled big cat whilst holding a whip (or any other item that requires the use of right-click).

My cat just suddenly started breathing very fast, panting with her mouth open, and twitching. She got very week short after, in able to walk, with an extremely fast heart rate. She stumbled to get her self to an is played corner where i left her to calm down with her babies and the Window opened to help her get more oxygen. She is a first time mother of four kittens that are about 5 weeks old, and im scared to death that she might be really sick. She seamed to have called down a bit, but she still seams extremely week and gets tired fast. Has trouble walking and her appetite seams to have gone down dramatically. I want to take her to a vet but I am studying abroad in jordan and there are basically no animal hospitals here, but there are veterinarians. Is there any recomended medications or something i can do to help her get better?
The Maine Coon, one of the oldest in North America, was first discovered in Maine, where it is the official state feline. According to the International Cat Association (TICA), they are known and liked for their intelligence, friendliness and good-natured goofiness. (Fetch? Heck yeah!) They prefer to hang with their people versus being coddled by them.
My cat was run over nearly a month ago. She had her tail amputated. She then come home and developed a lump in her belly. She went back to the vets and had surgery the lump was removed and sent to the lab for testing. It come back with relation to trauma of the car accident. Then last Friday i took her cone off to eat her dinner i went upstairs to have a shower and left her unattended when i come down her cut and drain marks were bleeding. I took her back to the vets who cleaned her up and sent us home! Sunday i noticed she was very quiet and not herself. I took her to the vets last night and she was shaking and her breathing was up at 48 breathes per minute! the vet gave her a 2 week antibiotic injection and has sent us home! today Wednesday i measured her breathing again and it is still at 48 a minute. I have called the vet and said that if she is still the same tomorrow then bring her back. How long does it take for the antibiotic to start working and will this then slow her breathing down? Thank you in advance
The Russian Blue is a gentle cat with a somewhat shy nature around strangers. They are devoted to and affectionate with their loved ones. Sensitive to their owner’s moods, the Russian Blue will greet you at the door, find a quiet seat next to you, or fetch a toy at playtime. In fact, “fetching” is a favorite pastime for Russians and their owners! Pull out the vacuum cleaner, and the Russian will find a safer and quieter location. Relatively quiet-voiced (except perhaps at mealtime), the Russian Blue appreciates a pat on the head, a window from which to watch the birds, and, of course, the comforts of home. Minimal grooming is required; regular nail clipping, good nutrition, an occasional combing, and lots of petting keep your Russian Blue pet looking spectacular.
Standard tests include a complete blood count, biochemical profile, and urine analysis. These will help your veterinarian to determine if your cat has an infection or a low red blood cell count. They will also show whether your cat's internal organs are functioning normally. Your veterinarian will also draw a sample of blood to test the amount of oxygen and carbon dioxide in your cat's blood. This will help to determine how severe your cat's breathing difficulty is and whether the problem is in the lungs or somewhere else in the chest. Your veterinarian may also draw blood for a heartworm test. Other diagnostic tools that may be used are X-ray and ultrasound images of the chest, both to examine for an enlarged heart that can lead to heart failure, and to see if the lungs appear normal. The internal structure of the abdomen may also be examined using this method. If there appears to be an accumulation of fluid in the chest, lungs or belly, some of that fluid will be drawn off for analysis.
Finally, the Governing Council of the Cat Fancy recognized the breed, and in 1912, the Russian Blue was granted a class of its own. Any progress in the breed's popularity was to come to an abrupt end, when World War II was waged over most of Europe, killing most of the Russian Blues. Breeders intent on bringing the Russian Blue line back began crossing the cats with British Blues and Bluepoint Siamese. At the same time, Scandinavian breeders crossed the blue cats from Finland with similarly colored Siamese cats.
The heavy breathing is likely due to the pain which Blaze is experiencing, without examining him I cannot give you any specific indication of what has occurred but would recommend that you visit your Veterinarian for an examination to determine whether it is due to a traumatic injury from playing or from another cause. Visit your Veterinarian before they close for the weekend. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
One important note to keep in mind with this breed is its love of food. It will eat beyond its need and ask for seconds, making it a sure candidate for weight related conditions if it is allowed to eat as much as it wants. The best prevention is measuring the food and giving it only at assigned times of the day, and making sure that everyone in the house knows that they cannot give the cat too many treats or scraps.
If Mya started panting after playing suddenly, that may be a sign that something might be wrong. If is has been hotter than normal, and suddenly, that might explain the panting. It is difficult to say without the ultrasound whether she has a problem or not, unfortunately. She seems quite healthy otherwise, but if the panting is a dramatic change, having the ultrasound will let you know what is going on with her.

There are various different causes for rapid breathing which may include infections, pain, heart disorders, dehydration among other causes; a cat’s respiration should be below 30 breaths per minute when at rest but if it is significantly above this rate at rest I would suggest visiting your Veterinarian for an examination to determine a cause. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM 
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