Long term prognosis for recovery of your cat will vary from cause to cause. Infections and pneumonia are serious illnesses that need a high degree of specialized veterinary care. In all cases, your cat’s chances for a full recovery will increase if immediate veterinarian care is sought as soon as initial symptoms are detected. Additionally, given the seriousness of lung and breathing issues, you should follow up after symptoms in your cat have resolved in order to prevent potential recurrence. 

Pyothorax (pleural empyema) is the presence of pus in the pleural space in the chest cavity, the thin, fluid-filled space that lies between the lungs and the chest wall. Any pathogenic organism can cause pyothorax including fungal, viral, bacterial or protozoal; however, a bacterial infection is by far the most common pathogen. The collection of pus is due to dead white blood cells and dead bacteria. Common bacteria involved in pyothorax include Pasteurella spp (the most common), Nocardia spp,  Streptococcus spp, Clostridium spp, Proteus spp, Bacteroides spp and Mycoplasma spp.
My cat (8-9 months) just got spayed 2 days ago. I have another cat so to be sure the wound was safe we got her a vest instead of a cone. she came home that afternoon and she was very quiet and would not walk around, we thought it was normal due to the vest and anesthesia. yesterday we noticed she isn't eating, drinking or going to the litterbox on her own. she only wants to lay down and sleep. If we bring her to the water, food, and litter box she'll do her things and just lay down again. we kept thinking she was just tired or did not like to walk with the vest so we went to sleep this morning o notice she is not in her bed but inside the transporter box, and breathing quite fast. My boyfriend took her to the vet, to do an X-ray and they said she had some pulmonary infection but they can't do the necessary tests to pinpoint exactly what is the issue because it requires anesthesia and she just had one a few days ago. they gave her some medicine bt it did not work and they are moving her to the vet hospital so she can have someone with her during the night. should I be worried, will she be ok?
My cat developed rapid labored respirations a week ago, the vet diagnosed lung cancer and he also had bladder infection. On xray he had consolidated whitish area with scattered crystal like areas. He was given antibiotics for infection and a steroid injection the vet said to temporary help with the breathing but he said my pet did not have long to live. He is breathing less labored and his rate fluctuates between 60-80/min. question is could this be something else instead of cancer-fungal, parasite? I do feed stray cats and even though he is mainly indoor cat I do take him out when I'm outside and he has gone under shrubs and maybe has sniffed something?
My fiance said the he saw her eat this afternoon, so that is a relief. Her gums are pink (that's one of the first things I looked at on her and I should've told you that...but... this is my BABY CAT and she has me a little panicked!.. not like dealing with humans on the ambulance... she's innocent!) I do have access to oxygen... so we can make her an oxygen tent if it's necessary. Right now, she is getting up every couple of minutes and repositioning or pacing.. her respiration rate is around 50 right now... her belly almost looks like it's spasming and her heart rate is running between 80 and 90 everytime we take it... which is low... what do you suggest??????
My 4 year old cat,yuri,had diaherria and vomited after she vomited she started to breathe rapidly and acted uneasey we thought maybe she has heatstroke so we cooled her off and after that we thought she was OK but we did not realize later that she was still breathing rapidly and acting lethargic the whole day ,she also hasn't eaten anything at since morning and has drank very little water ,I've been very worried and been thinking to take her to the vet tomorrow morning ,just hoping you guys would give us some advice for the night

As the name suggests, this breed is believed to have originated in Russia. It is widely believed that British sailors, fascinated by this breed of cat, brought them home from the White Sea port town of Archangel (Arkhangelsk) in northern Russia. The presence of a warm, thick coat suggests that they were long accustomed to surviving in a cold climate. As mentioned earlier in this article, there has been some suggestion that the Russian Blue lived in the wild and was hunted for its fur. Whether these stories are true or not remains pure speculation.
Thank you for your email. Without seeing Sharleen, I can't recommend any medication or therapies for her, and many OTC pain medications are toxic to cats. Your veterinarian will be able to recommend something for her discomfort since they have seen her and know her history. It would be a great idea to call them and let them know that you think she is in pain, and follow any recommendations that they may have. I hope that everything goes well for her.
My kitten Rupert is only 7 weeks old and he started breathing rapidly the night before. At times he groans and breathes with his mouth open. He feels and sounds most uncomfortable when he is being held, but still has discomfort if laying down for a long time. I'm not sure if he has a cold, or if its something wrong with his lungs? He had just been in the emergency just 2 days ago for low blood sugar, but he wasn't doing this at that time. What do I do?

In 1871 a Russian Blue was shown at the first cat show at the Crystal Palace in London, under the name Archangel Cat. At this point, Russian Blues were shorthaired, solid blue felines with foreign body types. From photos and published sources of the time, the original coat was thick, dense, glossy, and colored a light silver-blue. Russian Blues competed in the same class with all other shorthaired blues, despite obvious differences in type. Since the round-headed, cobby British Blues were favored in the show halls, the slender Russian Blues rarely won.

Standard tests include a complete blood count, biochemical profile, and urine analysis. These will help your veterinarian to determine if your cat has an infection or a low red blood cell count. They will also show whether your cat's internal organs are functioning normally. Your veterinarian will also draw a sample of blood to test the amount of oxygen and carbon dioxide in your cat's blood. This will help to determine how severe your cat's breathing difficulty is and whether the problem is in the lungs or somewhere else in the chest. Your veterinarian may also draw blood for a heartworm test. Other diagnostic tools that may be used are X-ray and ultrasound images of the chest, both to examine for an enlarged heart that can lead to heart failure, and to see if the lungs appear normal. The internal structure of the abdomen may also be examined using this method. If there appears to be an accumulation of fluid in the chest, lungs or belly, some of that fluid will be drawn off for analysis.
We have a female persian cat and was diagnosed of cancer last December. Operation was scheduled right away but when the vet saw cancer cells spread all over he did not remove any of these cancer cells. So what we did, were are giving her turmeric everyday hoping it would help her in a way. It’s 5 months since then and i thought Cindy, name of our cat will continue to be well. But, something unusual i noticed, she is breathing rapidly and her appetite to eat lessen. Actually, she wants to eat but she can’t swallow the food. It breaks my heart to see her suffering difficulty in breathing. Is my cat dying? What medicine to give her to ease her breathing? Please advise. Vilma

A cat may have rapid breathing for a variety of different reasons which may include infections, pain, high temperature (to cool down), heart failure among other causes; if your Veterinarian was unable to identify a cause, you should keep a close eye on Skittle and see if there is anything which occurs before an episode as it may be a reaction to anxiety from something. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM 

Unlike horses, the breeding pair does not need to be kept away from other big cats, but they do need to be kept close in order to breed, therefore it is recommended to place them in a fenced area. Winged big cats, ghosts and hybrids are sterile and cannot be bred, and snow leopards, white lions and white lionesses cannot breed with other big cat species.
Points or Pointed Markings: "Points," or darker shades of the body color, generally include the ears, muzzle, tail, and feet of the cat. The original pointed cat was the Siamese, and many years later, the Himalayan was developed by crossing Siamese with Persian cats. Many other breeds of pointed cats are now accepted by cat registries, including Ragdoll, Ragamuffin, Birman, Exotic, Balinese, and Javanese. Breed registries disallow pointed patterns in most other breeds. Many mixed breed cats display these distinctive points, which may be found in various colors.

Because they are easily startled, it’s best to keep equipment and devices that make loud noises, i.e., vacuum cleaners, blenders and such tucked away in a storage or a corner spot in the house. When this happens, scoop up your cat, place them in a quiet, safe spot and reassure him. Allocate a quiet space for your cat as sort of “sanctuary” so they can retreat as needed.
Okay so we’ve had our cat since being a kitten and she’s always been very scatty as we think she was abused, due to getting her and her having marks on her neck, but her breathing has always been rapid. (80 resps per minute) but in herself, she’s like any normal cat. She’s very friendly, not in any form of pain, is this something that needs to be addressed?
Hello so my cat is around 8 years old and is a outdoor cat. He came in today and is very low energy sitting in the middle of my room on the floor which is very unusual for him. He is breathing very rapidly, and aggressively. He sometimes makes a little noise out of his mouth. So I don’t know if this is something small and I shouldn’t worry, but this is my first day of seeing this symptoms so if it continues then I’ll go see a vet.
^ "Colorpoint Longhair" has multiple meanings and "Javanese" has been used for at least one other breed; the WCF uses the "Javanese" name for the Oriental Longhair (not colorpointed). The WCF has also merged the colorpointed Javanese/Colorpoint Longhair, the Himalayan and the Colourpoint Shorthair of other registries into a single breed, the Colourpoint. In the CFA, the TICA and some other registries, the Javanese/Colorpoint Longhair has merged back into the Balinese as a division
Queening is a painful process just like childbirth is for humans and some heavy breathing or panting may occur afterwards for a few days due to discomfort. But if you feel that she is straining or in distress you should visit your Veterinarian to check her over to ensure that there isn’t a retained kitten or another issue leading to these symptoms. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
In 1871 a Russian Blue was shown at the first cat show at the Crystal Palace in London, under the name Archangel Cat. At this point, Russian Blues were shorthaired, solid blue felines with foreign body types. From photos and published sources of the time, the original coat was thick, dense, glossy, and colored a light silver-blue. Russian Blues competed in the same class with all other shorthaired blues, despite obvious differences in type. Since the round-headed, cobby British Blues were favored in the show halls, the slender Russian Blues rarely won.

My cat had an leg amputation two days ago, he recoverd fine and this morning he was walking in the house, eating and using the sand box. Suddenly this afternoon he began to act very strange he began breathing heavily and a few hours ago he started to wheeze and he wants to vomit but nothing comes out. I am really worried I did phone my vet she said it is normal for them to experience great pain. He received tolfedine for pain to be taken in the mornings, could it be the pain medication has wornbeen off and he is experiencing pain or is it something else?
While asthma would be helped by albuterol if this were related to heart disease then albuterol can be contraindicated, as it may raise an already fast heart rate making her heart function even more inefficient. I understand that you were trying to do anything to help but I don't recommend starting therapy without a better idea of what her primary problem is.
Do your research. Bengals, Savannahs and many other hybrids even removed from the original crosses can be bad bad bad cats to have. Why risk a hybrid wild animal when you can get domestics that look just as amazing? Example: Ocicat; Egyptian Mau; if you are looking for wild looking cats. Classic Bombay cats look like black panthers; pixie bobs (some say are hybrids but its bunk) and highlanders are wild looking cats but not wild in the slightest. Many were made from regular domestic crosses with purebreds and/or landrace natural breeds etc. Look around, use wikipedia. Check out the cat fancy sites. There are domestics for everyone. Most are cheaper too. Wild animals/hybrids are like leaving a loaded pistol on your computer desk. You just never know for sure what can happen. Domestics can be unpredictable in the right circumstances, why add in a wild/hybrid factor and possibly endanger people and other pets around you? Would you want to carry that guilt the rest of your life?

This breed does not like change, preferring for things to be uniform and predictable. It can be thrown off when dinnertime is altered, and is nit-picky about hygiene. It will not even enter its litter box if it is dirty. In the early years, this breed developed a reputation at shows for being difficult to work with because of traits like these. The Russian Blue was gentle and happy at home, but at shows it was visibly discontent and temperamental. Popularity declined and fewer Russian Blues were being shown until breeders focused on improving the attitudes of the breed through selective breeding and behavior management (e.g., soft music, recording of show noises, crystals, herbal remedies). This commitment to the breed paid off, and today the Russian Blue is a happy participant at cat shows.


These intelligent animals will require substantial amounts of physical and mental activity. Keep toys lying around the house at all times. When they feel the need to “hunt”, a ball of string or a toy fish should capture their attention for hours. Keep in mind that these types of toys require human supervision as the contents could be chewed up, which can be harmful for your cat’s health.
My 4 year old cat,yuri,had diaherria and vomited after she vomited she started to breathe rapidly and acted uneasey we thought maybe she has heatstroke so we cooled her off and after that we thought she was OK but we did not realize later that she was still breathing rapidly and acting lethargic the whole day ,she also hasn't eaten anything at since morning and has drank very little water ,I've been very worried and been thinking to take her to the vet tomorrow morning ,just hoping you guys would give us some advice for the night
This cat breed has a very interesting history. Sometimes referred to as Archangel Blues, the cats are believed to have originated in the Archangel Isles, located in Northern Russia, and may have been pets of Russian czars long time past. They’re considered a natural breed and not sprung from interbreeding programmes. The thick, warm coat is due to the cat needing something to keep warm against the frozen tundras and the cold, harsh winters of the country.
There are various causes for rapid breathing with pain being a common cause; infections, foreign bodies, heart conditions, allergies among other conditions may also cause rapid breathing. It may be worth trying to get Possum into the bathroom whilst you take a shower to see if the warm humid air helps to open her airway; otherwise we are a little bit stuck for a cause. If the cause was due to a blocked nose, your Veterinarian would have detected that on the physical examination. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
Chester was taken in last night for an abscess removal surgery on his neck. I got him back this morning and he is having trouble using his litter box. are there any suggestions to help him use it? also, the vet prescribed 2 antibiotics but no pain reliever for chester. he has a drain in his face and i could only imagine how painful it will be for the next few days until he gets it removed. i was told that chester was given a pain medication shot. how long is this supposed to last? it doesn't seem humane to let him go back home without the necessary pain relief medication. In addition, his breathing is quite fast. is that normal for a post abscess removal surgery?
There are good and bad with everything. The genetic code is being increased with more offspring from more individual tigers, you will have a stronger genetic code. The question is animal quality of life. But ask yourself this. If a tiger is brought into the world to an abusive trainer, would that tiger rather be unborn? Hopefully we can rescue them when they are abused, but a living being is precious and always wanted in this world.
While oxygen is being transferred to the red blood cells, carbon dioxide is transferred from the red blood cells into the lungs. It is then carried out through the nose through a process referred to as expiration. This cyclic motion of breathing is controlled by the respiratory center in the brain and nerves in the chest. Diseases that affect the respiratory system, or the respiratory center in the brain, can bring about breathing difficulties. Troubled or labored breathing is medically referred to as dyspnea, and excessively rapid breathing is medically referred to as tachypnea (also, polypnea).
Much like her Siamese relative, the Russian blue is very vocal, and she'll use her voice to communicate with her pet parents when she wants to play, eat, or snuggle. She's both observant and persistent, always ensuring that her needs are met. She doesn't adapt well to change, such as varying meal times or unknown visitors, so expect to hear about it! She'll respond positively if you converse back-and-forth with her on a regular basis, which means you're never truly alone when you have a Russian blue fur baby.
Thank you for you email. unfortunately, without examining Kai, i can't comment on what might be going on with him. He needs to see his veterinarian to try and determine what is going on with him and how to treat him. If he seems to be in distress and unable to catch his breath, taking him to the emergency clinic tonight is most appropriate. I hope that he is okay.

The respiration rate is very high, but without an examination I cannot give you any recommendations; you should continue to monitor Teddy for the time being and keep in contact with your regular Veterinarian. If money is tight, there are nonprofit organisations which may be able to help with the cost of veterinary care, see link below. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM www.dogingtonpost.com/need-help-with-vet-bills-or-pet-food-there-are-resources-available/
My kitten Rupert is only 7 weeks old and he started breathing rapidly the night before. At times he groans and breathes with his mouth open. He feels and sounds most uncomfortable when he is being held, but still has discomfort if laying down for a long time. I'm not sure if he has a cold, or if its something wrong with his lungs? He had just been in the emergency just 2 days ago for low blood sugar, but he wasn't doing this at that time. What do I do?
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