My cat was run over nearly a month ago. She had her tail amputated. She then come home and developed a lump in her belly. She went back to the vets and had surgery the lump was removed and sent to the lab for testing. It come back with relation to trauma of the car accident. Then last Friday i took her cone off to eat her dinner i went upstairs to have a shower and left her unattended when i come down her cut and drain marks were bleeding. I took her back to the vets who cleaned her up and sent us home! Sunday i noticed she was very quiet and not herself. I took her to the vets last night and she was shaking and her breathing was up at 48 breathes per minute! the vet gave her a 2 week antibiotic injection and has sent us home! today Wednesday i measured her breathing again and it is still at 48 a minute. I have called the vet and said that if she is still the same tomorrow then bring her back. How long does it take for the antibiotic to start working and will this then slow her breathing down? Thank you in advance
This is simply not true. The bad comments I have seen have only been from owner who should have not owned a cat to begin with. People who don’t have problems don’t go posting on the internet about how they don’t have issues. Just like a golden retriever or any other more athletic intelligent breed some people simple don’t match with the breed. People who buy an athletic type animal yet wont met its requirement for attention and mental stimulation.
If your cat is struggling to breath and is not eating or moving, it could be a sign of trauma in cats. A steep fall, collision or dog attack can result in internal injuries, which can affect your cats lung capacity. An internal hemorrhage, intense pain, fractures or pneumothorax constitute as emergencies that can cause fast, superficial abdominal breathing in cats.
It is difficult to say whether this is something pathological or not since the rapid breathing for a short period of time may be due to smelling something (looks like breathing with the chest movements) or another cause; if there are no other symptoms and these ‘episodes’ only last a couple of seconds I would keep an eye on things for now and bring it up with your Veterinarian at Salem’s next checkup. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

This is a well-behaved cat that is easy to train. Or, rather, it easily trains its people. It enjoys a good game of fetch and will keep the game going longer than you may have time for, and you will make time because the Russian Blue is known for actually appearing hurt when it has been ignored. Elegant, and reserved, this cat is also very playful, and loves to chase after toys or sunbeams.
The Chausie was developed from hybrids of the Jungle Cat (Felis chaus), the largest species of the genus Felis, found in Asia. They can grow up to three feet long and weigh 35 pounds, but are generally around 18 pounds. Like the hybrids that developed into the Savannah and Bengal breeds, the males of the first few generations are usually infertile, and the F4 and F5 are considered truly domestic and suitable for cat shows. TICA classifies the Chausie as a championship breed.

Last, but maybe most important is, if you can pay to see wild cats on your terms (ie: cheaply, in a cage, or being forced to let you touch them and have your photo with them or their young) then you aren’t learning anything about who these animals really are. You aren’t learning about how they fit into a complex environment when they are housed in a situation that does not duplicate all of the web of life that they are a part of in the wild. All wild cats roam territories that are calculated in miles, not square feet. To know anything about them, you have to see who they are in their real environment.
The TICA Chausie breed standard allows three colors: solid black, black grizzled tabby, and black (a.k.a. brown) ticked tabby.[8] Because the Chausie breed is relatively new, Chausies are still frequently born that have a variety of other colors and patterns, and they make wonderful pets. However, only the three permissible colors are considered ideal. Only cats in the three permissible colors can be entered in new breed classes at cat shows, and only the three colors will be eligible eventually for championship classes. Gold or yellow eye color is preferred, though yellower and lighter shades of green are allowed.

A loss of appetite and lethargy are both vague symptoms but the rapid breathing is concerning, you should visit your Veterinarian for an examination as rapid breathing may be associated with pain, anaemia, heart disease among many other conditions. Without examining Ozzy I cannot determine the specific underlying cause of the symptoms and would recommend that a visit to your Veterinarian be made before the weekend. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
I cannot think of a connection between the running after another cat and the symptoms that she is presenting with except possibly hypoglycemia (normally causes an increase in appetite) due to the blood glucose level being too low. I would suggest to rub a little corn syrup or honey on the gums to see if there is any improvement in Cupcake’s symptoms; ensure you keep Cupcake hydrated and visit your Veterinarian on Monday morning, if the symptoms increase in severity visit an Emergency Veterinarian. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

Cats, both pedigreed and domestic, come in a rainbow of colors and patterns. These are all a matter of genetics, so a calico mother might give birth in one litter to calico, tabby, and solid or bicolored kittens, depending on her genetic background and the background of the male cat(s) that fathered the litter. Cats, come in three basic colors (called "self" by geneticists): red (commonly called "orange," or sometimes affectionately referred to as "ginger," or "marmalade"), black, and white.
Sorry to hear your kitty is scratching like that! Does he show any signs of skin infections, fleas, mites, wounds from other cats? The cone could have stressed him further, yes, if he was scratching already because of tension/anxiety. Open sores can get infected, especially when left untreated and scratched further. We would recommend taking your kitty to the vet for a diagnosis. They will be able to provide you the advice and medication your kitty might need. Best wishes!
×