Thank you for your email, I'm sorry that Cracker is having these problems. Without examining him, it is hard for me to advise you on whether he is suffering, and that is probably a question to ask the most recent veterinarian that you took him to. If he has a fungal or bacterial infection, he should be improving on those medications. If he has cancer, he may not improve, and it is important to assess his quality of life. If he starts breathing with his mouth open or stretching his neck to breathe, that is serious respiratory distress and is an emergency. IF he is eating and drinking and generally happy, he may be breathing heavier but not suffering. It would be best to have a recheck with the most recent veterinarian, as it has been a week on medications, and see if they feel he is improving - they may want to take x-rays and compare them with the previous x-rays to look for signs of improvement. They will be able to give you a better idea as to whether he may be suffering, or if he seems comfortable. I hope that all goes well with him.

Hello, so after I had a party at my house a few days ago, my cat has been very weak, sleeping all the time, won't eat or drink as much as he used to, and breathing rapidly. I tried bringing him to a vet a couple of days ago and they said it was only stress due to the loud music and crowds from the party, and they told me to give him liquid food along with vitamins every hour for a few days. I've done that for a couple of days but it seems like my cat's breathing actually had gotten more shallow and heavy. I'm afraid that the vet misdiagnosed my cat (I don't trust the credibility of that vet, since they're not the one I'm used to go to), do you think there's anything more than just stress? Also if it helps, he's just gotten his first vaccination around last week. Thank you
Hello. My cay spooky was hospitalized last night for suspected poisoning from bug spray. He was stabilized and spent the night with iv and vitamins, pain medication etc. Today at around 5 they released him to be watched at home and he seems much better although he seems to be having rapid breaths or a hard time breathing. I can hear it and he seems to be straining. Is this from all the medication or residual poison? will it pass?
Lethargy and increased respiratory rate are not specific symptoms as they are shared with many conditions; however I’m concerned that they are a common sign that an animal is in pain, but without examining Marilyn I cannot say whether she is in pain or there is another cause for the symptoms. You should visit your Veterinarian for an examination to be on the safe side especially if this has been going on for a day or more. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
There are other reasons, in the real world, why it doesn’t work, which includes the fact that human – big cat conflict is one of the main reasons cats are wiped out of areas. Captive breeding not only selectively chooses animals that are least fit for the wild but also conditions the cats to not fear humans. That increases the conflict and the result is that not only would the offending cat be killed, but likely any wild cat seen in the area would be hunted down and killed in a case of mistaken identity. That escalates the extinction of cats in the wild.
Adding to the captivating physical qualities of this breed is the eye color. The eyes are yellow while the Russian Blue is a kitten, and by four months there is a bright green ring around the pupil. As the cat matures, the eye color graduates into a bright, vivid green, aesthetically intensifying the already remarkable blue-silver coloring of the cat. The eyes are wide set and round, and only slightly slanted at the upper corners, giving the Russian Blue a sweet expression that matches well with its gentle temperament.
Thank you for your email. It would be best to have him examined by your veterinarian, yes - if he had any type of underlying heart problem that you weren't aware of, they stress of being restrained may have caused fluid to build up around his heart and lungs. They may want to take an x-ray to make sure that he is okay, but it isn't normal for him to still be breathing heavily and coughing 2 days after the event. I hope that he is okay.

Without examining Tilly I cannot say for certain whether I would recommend euthanasia or not; but if she is struggling to breathe, seems in pain and your Veterinarian hasn’t recommended any surgical options (due to age or location of tumour) then you may want to think about euthanasia. It is a very difficult decision to make, but you need to look at Tilly’s quality of life and what the future holds for her. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
Not much is known about this rare breed; however, it is believed that the Russian blue originates from northern Russia, specifically the Archangel Isles. According to the Cat Fanciers' Association (CFA), cat rumor has it that "the Russian blue breed descended from the cats kept by the Russian Czars. Assuming the Russian blue did migrate from northern Russia, it was likely via ship to England and northern Europe in the mid-1860s." As early as the sixteenth century, recorded history shows that trade ships passed between this territory and the British Isles, and the Vikings were active in both regions centuries prior, but there is no mention of the Russian blue cat until the nineteenth century.
Those animals were then bred indiscriminately, and many purposely inbred for traits such as white coats, tiny size, and docile (read retarded) temperament. None of the exotic cats in wild hands can be traced back to the wild, other than local cats, cougars and bobcats, who may have been snatched from the wild in the U.S. For that reason they can never be bred for introduction back to the wild.
Tilson says tigers are the most charismatic animal on earth. Their appeal is universal. “They are the alpha predator who used to kill and eat us,” he says. “We cannot help but be in awe of their power and grace. Tigers represent everything fine and decent and powerful. Everything those people would like to be. It’s all an ego trip—big guns, big trucks, and big tigers.”
Russian Blues are fiercely loyal and they bond strongly when given enough care and attention. It’s understandable that these cats may be wary of strangers and new guests and show aloofness, but it’s their nature. They are very sociable and are great companions for young children. Moreover, the Foreign Blue is very patient and tolerant towards the younger ones who should treat them with utmost kindness and respect. The cat can put up with a few clumsy pats on the head from infants, but too much of it and they’ll most likely slink away or climb up to a safer spot.
Without an examination and possibly a blood test, it is difficult to say what the cause for Buddy’s symptoms are; however eclampsia is a possible cause and would require immediate attention from a Veterinarian if this is the case. I am not sure about veterinary care in Jordan but I know that there is a veterinary school in Al Ramtha, Irbid, Jordan if that is close to you if you require veterinary care. https://wagwalking.com/cat/condition/eclampsia- www.just.edu.jo/FacultiesandDepartments/FacultyOfVeterinaryMedicine/Pages/Default.aspx
These intelligent animals will require substantial amounts of physical and mental activity. Keep toys lying around the house at all times. When they feel the need to “hunt”, a ball of string or a toy fish should capture their attention for hours. Keep in mind that these types of toys require human supervision as the contents could be chewed up, which can be harmful for your cat’s health.

There are good and bad with everything. The genetic code is being increased with more offspring from more individual tigers, you will have a stronger genetic code. The question is animal quality of life. But ask yourself this. If a tiger is brought into the world to an abusive trainer, would that tiger rather be unborn? Hopefully we can rescue them when they are abused, but a living being is precious and always wanted in this world.


Sharleen ear temperature change hot to cold 4 times overnight. Sound stuffy when purr. Breath heavily and urinate lots and often last few weeks. Took her to the vet for blood work and check up today. She seem worse and in pain. Lower lip is now swollen, right front leg a little limping. Not active all afternoon. Night fall and she seem restless. What can I do to ease her pain while waiting for blood work result?
Russian Blues have a tolerant nature toward children who treat them kindly and respectfully. They will even put up with the clumsy pats given by toddlers, as if they recognize that no harm is meant, and if necessary they will walk away or climb out of reach to escape being bonked on the head. That said, the patient and gentle Russian Blue should always be protected from rough treatment, so always supervise very young children when they want to pet the cat.

Those animals were then bred indiscriminately, and many purposely inbred for traits such as white coats, tiny size, and docile (read retarded) temperament. None of the exotic cats in wild hands can be traced back to the wild, other than local cats, cougars and bobcats, who may have been snatched from the wild in the U.S. For that reason they can never be bred for introduction back to the wild.


There are many possible causes for rapid breathing in cats which may include allergies or irritation; however it may also be due to more serious conditions including infections, heart failure, anaemia among other causes. Without examining Lexa I cannot say what the specific cause is, you should visit your Veterinarian if Lexa’s resting respiratory rate is above 40 breaths per minute to determine the cause and treat accordingly. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
World War II nearly put an end to the breed. Very few cats survived the years of privation, and British and Scandinavian breeders turned to other breeds, primarily the Siamese and the British Blue, to help revive their bloodlines. Because of the Siamese influence, the cats developed a more extreme look, and the texture of their coat changed. It took years to bring the breed back to its original appearance. That was achieved by combining British bloodlines, which emphasized plush, silvery coats, and Scandinavian bloodlines, which were known for producing cats with bright breen eyes and flat profiles. The result was the Russian Blue of moderate type seen today.
My 4 year old cat,yuri,had diaherria and vomited after she vomited she started to breathe rapidly and acted uneasey we thought maybe she has heatstroke so we cooled her off and after that we thought she was OK but we did not realize later that she was still breathing rapidly and acting lethargic the whole day ,she also hasn't eaten anything at since morning and has drank very little water ,I've been very worried and been thinking to take her to the vet tomorrow morning ,just hoping you guys would give us some advice for the night

There is no approved adulticide (medications to kill adult heartworms) treatments for cats. Adulticides are themselves dangerous. A single dead worm can be fatal in cats as it can break away and cause a blockage of the pulmonary artery (pulmonary embolism). Heartworms in cats have a shorter lifespan than those in dogs; therefore it is preferable to manage symptoms and use a wait and see approach.
The physical appearance of the Archangel is so appealing that you, family members and guests will be drawn to the feline right away. The silver-tinged blue coat, accompanied by intelligent, slightly sloped green eyes add elegance and ambiance to any room. Once you get to know your cat and the Foreign Blue accepts, then it becomes evident that they make the perfect pets. Their intelligent and playful nature will go a long way towards a fulfilling relationship in any household.
A cat may have rapid breathing for a variety of different reasons which may include infections, pain, high temperature (to cool down), heart failure among other causes; if your Veterinarian was unable to identify a cause, you should keep a close eye on Skittle and see if there is anything which occurs before an episode as it may be a reaction to anxiety from something. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
Without examining Midnight it is difficult to give a diagnosis since lethargy and loss of appetite are vague symptoms common with many different conditions; infections, parasites (regardless of indoor or not), foreign objects, poisoning, spoiled food, injury (fell from somewhere) among many other causes may lead to these symptoms. You should ensure that Midnight is kept hydrated, but if there is no improvement you should visit your Veterinarian for an examination. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

All big cat species spawn on grass blocks at light levels of 9 or more with at least 2 block space above. Some species can only spawn in certain biomes; leopards and panthers spawn in jungles, forests and their variants; lions and tigers spawn in plains and forests; and snow leopards spawn in cold biomes. Lions and tigers also spawn more frequently than panthers. There is a 1/20 chance of a white lion, lioness or tiger spawning, and a lower chance for a white cub to spawn.


My cat developed rapid labored respirations a week ago, the vet diagnosed lung cancer and he also had bladder infection. On xray he had consolidated whitish area with scattered crystal like areas. He was given antibiotics for infection and a steroid injection the vet said to temporary help with the breathing but he said my pet did not have long to live. He is breathing less labored and his rate fluctuates between 60-80/min. question is could this be something else instead of cancer-fungal, parasite? I do feed stray cats and even though he is mainly indoor cat I do take him out when I'm outside and he has gone under shrubs and maybe has sniffed something?
It is possible that Milu is breathing rapidly due to pain, falling from that height may have left Milu with some permanent injury which occasionally causes some pain; however without examining him I cannot say with any certainty. You should continue to monitor him and look out for any other symptoms, but any head trauma may present with issue later on in life. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
The domestic short-haired and domestic long-haired cat types are not breeds, but terms used (with various spellings) in the cat fancy to describe mongrel cats of a general type, by coat length, that do not belong to a particular breed. Some registries permit them to be pedigreed and they have been used as foundation stock in the establishment of some breeds. They should not be confused with standardized breeds with similar names, such as British Shorthair and Oriental Longhair.

A tigon is a hybrid cross between a male tiger (Panthera tigris) and a female lion (Panthera leo). Thus, it has parents with the same genus but of different species. The tigon is not currently as common as the converse hybrid, the liger.The tigon’s genome includes genetic components of both parents. Tigons can exhibit visible characteristics from both parents: they can have both spots from the mother (lions carry genes for spots—lion cubs are spotted and some adults retain faint markings) and stripes from the father. Any mane that a male tigon may have will appear shorter and less noticeable than a lion’s mane and is closer in type to the ruff of a male tiger. It is a common misconception that tigons are smaller than lions or tigers. They do not exceed the size of their parent species because they inherit growth-inhibitory genes from the lioness mother, but they do not exhibit any kind of dwarfism or miniaturization; they often weigh around 180 kilograms (400 lb).
A loss of appetite and lethargy are both vague symptoms but the rapid breathing is concerning, you should visit your Veterinarian for an examination as rapid breathing may be associated with pain, anaemia, heart disease among many other conditions. Without examining Ozzy I cannot determine the specific underlying cause of the symptoms and would recommend that a visit to your Veterinarian be made before the weekend. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
An increased respiratory rate at rest over 40 breaths per minute is concerning, you should think about visiting your Veterinarian for an examination since this may be an indicator for pain, heart disease, infections among other conditions. Without examining Jupiter for any other symptoms I cannot narrow in on a specific cause. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
My cat is a 2 year old Male. He is breathing heavily and he doesn't have his mouth open. Everytime he moves he meows in pain, doesn't want me to touch him. He just keeps laying down and cant get comfortable. He was playing with his brother in the middle of the night. He came to bed was fine but I woke up this morning and he doesn't wanna be touched or covered up to stay warm. His ears are freezing cold.
I have a 7 yr old Scottish Fold. I took her to the vet on Friday because I noticed her breathing rapidly. The vet said there were no signs of a respiratory infection (lungs sounded clear, eyes & ears appeared fine) but gave her a shot of antibiotics and some pain med. (in case she was panting due to being in pain)and sent us home. Its now 2 days later and shes still having a hard time breathing. Could she possibly jst have a stuffy nose from allergies and thats causing her to struggle. I mentioned it to the vet, but he said no because her nose doesnt have any discharge.
My daughters cat is mainly an inside cat but goes outside on occasion, 3 days ago she went outside to have a sniff when she spotted another cat and went bolting after it , in panic my daughter and I went running after her when we retrieved her she started vomiting up what I guessed was stomach acid due to the fact her body was not prepared or designed for that fast bolt. My daughter let her distress and calm down. Later in the evening we noticed she was still breathing very rapidly like she was when we retrieved her we thought maybe she was still highly stressed and that it may go away by morning. Morning came and I had work my daughter was looking after her cat and her condition had not changed my daughter tried feeding the cat her favourite treat ham which she usually can’t get enough of and now she ate one little bit and left the rest which is very out of character , my daughter told me this when I got home so I tired to feed the cat some dinner and she wouldn’t touch it this is when my daughter and started to feel really worried. We wanted to take her to the vet the next day but unfortunately all of them were closed due to it being a Sunday and we noticed she hadn’t used her litter and hadn’t been drinking unless my daughter fed water to her though a syringe. It is the middle of the night now when I’m writing this and she is still rapidly breathing and still hasn’t eaten for 2days please any help would be appreciated this cat is everything to my daughter thank you I hope to hear from you soon
So, my cat has been breathing fast for the last two days. She has been eating, drinking water and peeing/pooping normally as it seems... We had a big clean up in the house and all of us (humans and cats) were sneezing for a while so that is one of the possibilities, I guess...The other thing is that we had the sand of the sand box changed to one with a smell so maybe that was giving her allergies or something... These are two possibilities but I'm still worried. Do you think I should be concerned?
It’s a great thing you went to the vet immediately. And even better news if the doc said everything seemed normal! We are no veterinarians – Paul and I – so please take your vet’s advice first. I would just add that it’s a good sign there’s not really other symptoms to the fast breathing other than loss of appetite (which might come back, or might already have since this morning??) It could be a small respiratory infection or a general feeling of unwellness, but your cat is older so it’s a good thing you checked with a vet first. Now it’s roughly 7:30 pm for you, I’d say if your cat is not having any other physical signs of distress or panting, blue gums, or anything bizarre, it will be safe to wait until the morning to see if the breathing has calmed. But please go with your gut and your knowledge of your cat!! If your cat’s behavior is still abnormal and he is refusing food then give another shot at the vet’s office. Possible bloodwork could be done and tests to see if there’s heartworm or other diseases that could be a cause for the prolonged, rapid breathing.
HELLO . I HAVE SEALPOINT HIMALAYAN CAT AND HIS NAME IS CHOCO. I ALWAYS OBSERVE HIS BREATHING AND IT LOOK LIKE HIS SNOORING ALL THE TIME ESPECIALLY WHEN HE IS ASLEEP. I ALSO NOTICE THAT EVERYTIME HE GOES TO SLEEP, HE ALWAYS PUT HIS HEAD ON A PILLOW OR LOOKING UP IN THE CEILING. I ALSO FEEL THERE IS A SMALL CIRCLE AROUND HIS THROAT WHEN I TOUCH IT. I WAS SO DEEPLY BROKE EVERYTIME I THINK ABOUT MY LITTLE CHOCO's CONDITION . DO YOU HAVE ANY IDEAS ABOUT MY CONCERN? THIS WILL BE A BIG HELP FOR ME MY FRIEND. THANK YOU SO MUCH !!!!
Example a amazing Maine Coon can cost $1,200 (Parents HCM tested, fixed, shots, everything!) compared to a sickly Maine Coon (Parents not tested, no shots, not fixed and not pretty) post on a classified site that is $500. Some people blame the kitten mills, but the person to blame is some one funding those places. You can do the research, you can pick some one upholding proper ethics.
The Russian Blue is robust, marked by strong sinews, a velvety fur and fine outlines. This breed is closely related to 3 other cat breeds, namely the British Blue (or the British Shorthair), the French Chartreux and Thailand Korat because they share the same hue and have short hair, but the similarity ends there. Each of the aforementioned blue breeds have their own fun personality and coat characteristics.
My cat seems to have rapid breathing, I can see her stomach area rising and falling as she sleeps. I tried to take her breathing rate and got 60-65 per minute. She is grooming herself more than usual. She has always been skittish, her eating is normal, and she has had normal bladder and bowel functions. I have a hard time getting her into a carrier so I do not take her to the vet often. I am in an area that is getting prepared for a powerful nor'easter, so I can't get her to a vet for a few days. Should I be worried? What can I do?
Without an examination and possibly a blood test, it is difficult to say what the cause for Buddy’s symptoms are; however eclampsia is a possible cause and would require immediate attention from a Veterinarian if this is the case. I am not sure about veterinary care in Jordan but I know that there is a veterinary school in Al Ramtha, Irbid, Jordan if that is close to you if you require veterinary care. https://wagwalking.com/cat/condition/eclampsia- www.just.edu.jo/FacultiesandDepartments/FacultyOfVeterinaryMedicine/Pages/Default.aspx
If the resting respiratory rate is above 40 breaths per minute, you should ideally visit a Veterinarian for an examination as it can be difficult to narrow in on a specific cause; there are a few possible causes for this rapid breathing including infections, laryngeal disorders, pain among other causes. You should visit a Veterinarian as soon as possible for an examination to narrow in on a cause. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM 
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