Big cats can be made to sit by either right-clicking on the ground or on the big cat with a whip. When stationary, they will not move. You can toggle between them sitting and moving around by right-clicking the ground or the cat with a whip again. A player cannot mount a saddled big cat whilst holding a whip (or any other item that requires the use of right-click).
If Mya started panting after playing suddenly, that may be a sign that something might be wrong. If is has been hotter than normal, and suddenly, that might explain the panting. It is difficult to say without the ultrasound whether she has a problem or not, unfortunately. She seems quite healthy otherwise, but if the panting is a dramatic change, having the ultrasound will let you know what is going on with her.

My cat, Arwen, just came out to the living room limping badly with her front right leg kinda knuckling over. The leg and paw is cool to the touch in comparison to the rest of her body and her shoulder blade is just flat. I pinched her toes a little and there was no reaction. She's also breathing kind of shallow and fast with it seems like she's breathing from her stomach not her chest. She is crying a little bit but not when we touch the leg, onky when she tries to move around while laying down.


Hybrids have always been popular. They make people feel connected with the wilderness outside. We can’t all own lions and tigers (nor should we), but so many people want little felines that resemble their larger, exotic cousins. Some breeders have begun breeding smaller wild species with domestic cats to create beautiful hybrids that are safe for the average cat owner to live with. Although hybrids are still controversial, there is no denying how unique and beautiful they are. Take a look at the most popular hybrids below.

There are various causes for rapid breathing with pain being a common cause; infections, foreign bodies, heart conditions, allergies among other conditions may also cause rapid breathing. It may be worth trying to get Possum into the bathroom whilst you take a shower to see if the warm humid air helps to open her airway; otherwise we are a little bit stuck for a cause. If the cause was due to a blocked nose, your Veterinarian would have detected that on the physical examination. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM


You shouldn’t notice breathing rates over 40 breaths per minute in a resting cat; an increase in respiration may be due to inadequate airflow, malpositioning of the throat, respiratory infection, heart issues among other causes. Without examining Roxanne I cannot say for sure what is happening, keep a close eye on her and if you decide to have her fixed speak with your Veterinarian then. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
A stray cat showed up at my house a couple days ago. She is very thin and I've started her on small throughout the day. She is eating, drinking, voiding, and stooling okay. Eyes, ears, and nose are all clear. The only major thing I've noticed is rapid breathing when purring or stress (loud noises make her skittish). I have pets of my own and really cannot afford a costly vet visit, and our local shelter and a rescue are overwhelmed with companion animals at this time. I've started her on antibiotics and am keeping her isolated from my own pets. My daughter has asthma and this looks very similar. Any advice? I've found out that her previous owner passed away and a neighbour tried to bring her to her house, the cat bolted and they couldn't find her, 3 weeks later she showed up at my place. She is a spayed 5 year old female who was up to date on shots.
If Mya started panting after playing suddenly, that may be a sign that something might be wrong. If is has been hotter than normal, and suddenly, that might explain the panting. It is difficult to say without the ultrasound whether she has a problem or not, unfortunately. She seems quite healthy otherwise, but if the panting is a dramatic change, having the ultrasound will let you know what is going on with her.
When my kitten is sleeping he breathes very quickly. He doesn’t do it once in while, he does it every single time and throughout the whole time he’s sleeping. I read online that to calculate their breathing, I should count how many times they breathe within a 15 second period and multiply it by 4. It also said they’re normal breathing rate should be around 25-30 and my kitten’s is 92. He’s seems pretty healthy, he eats he’s food, he’s drinking his water, he’s very active so I’m very confused about this.

My 8 months old male cat is an outdoor cat and these days he started going outside the house fence for the first time( following my older cat) Today started raining and he came all dirty and wet and freezing. I immediately coverd him in a blanket and he’s been sleeping all day and not eating. He looks very tired and everytime I try to wake him he barely raises his head and also sometimes starts breathing very fast. Has he possibly cought a cold or maybe got injured ?? Help please 😩


My cat is about 9 years old, and about two days ago his breathing started to become very rapid at about 60-80 breaths per minute. He is eating properly and acting normally and doesn't appear to be in pain. Is there any reason this could be as this hasn't happened to any of our previous cats. He is also very healthy and has only gone to the vets for mess once for a urine infection he always has the de wormer and the anti flea drops as well as his vaccines
To know for sure you’ll need to see the pedigree and your cat should have been registered with a cat association. A pedigree is a family tree going back four years or more that contains the full names of the cats, all of which should be Russian Blues or cat breeds that are approved for breeding Russian Blues by the cat association. That sounds awfully complicated but all purebred cat cats are registered in that way in the West (Europe and North America). There are a number of cat associations. Hope this helps.
Thank you for your email. Unfortunately, without examining Bella, I'm not sure if she is having a problem or not. If her behavior seems off, and her breathing is more rapid, it is worth paying attention to, and if you can get her in to see your veteirnarian before the storm hits tomorrow it would probably be a good idea, to make sure she is okay. I hope that all goes well for her!
As with all non-domestic hybrid source breeds, some Chausies may inherit intestinal tracts similar to that of the non-domestic ancestors. The intestinal tract may be a little shorter than that of the traditional domestic cat. A shorter intestinal tract is thought to be less capable of processing ingredients derived from plants. That would include any kind of cereal, as well as vegetables, herbs, and spices. Those ingredients may serve as triggers for chronic intestinal inflammation and eventually lead to chronic inflammatory bowel disease that is perpetuated by multiple allergies to proteins in commercial cat food.[9] Regardless of the cause, Chausies do seem somewhat prone to developing food allergies. To prevent this, breeders advise Chausie owners to feed only very high quality commercial cat foods, containing as little of plant-derived ingredients as possible or advise feeding homemade raw or cooked meat diets with appropriate supplementation. If homemade diets are fed, it should be with the guidance of someone experienced in preparing them, because meat by itself does not contain all the nutrients that Chausies require.
Tilson says tigers are the most charismatic animal on earth. Their appeal is universal. “They are the alpha predator who used to kill and eat us,” he says. “We cannot help but be in awe of their power and grace. Tigers represent everything fine and decent and powerful. Everything those people would like to be. It’s all an ego trip—big guns, big trucks, and big tigers.”

Cat fanciers may think that Russian Blues only have blue coating, but this isn’t always the case. In other cat associations such as New Zealand and Australia, the term “Russians” can be applied to black and white varieties, alongside the traditional blues. Even the U.S. Cat Fanciers Association and TICA allows black-colored Russians or Russian Whites into play in provisional cases.
Rapid breathing may be caused by a variety of different issues which may include traumatic injury and pain; however if there has been a puncture wound to the chest or neck which is compromising the respiratory tract, it should be treated as a medical emergency. You should keep Grace calm for now but visit a Veterinarian as soon as one is open if she’s having difficulty breathing. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
My cat (8-9 months) just got spayed 2 days ago. I have another cat so to be sure the wound was safe we got her a vest instead of a cone. she came home that afternoon and she was very quiet and would not walk around, we thought it was normal due to the vest and anesthesia. yesterday we noticed she isn't eating, drinking or going to the litterbox on her own. she only wants to lay down and sleep. If we bring her to the water, food, and litter box she'll do her things and just lay down again. we kept thinking she was just tired or did not like to walk with the vest so we went to sleep this morning o notice she is not in her bed but inside the transporter box, and breathing quite fast. My boyfriend took her to the vet, to do an X-ray and they said she had some pulmonary infection but they can't do the necessary tests to pinpoint exactly what is the issue because it requires anesthesia and she just had one a few days ago. they gave her some medicine bt it did not work and they are moving her to the vet hospital so she can have someone with her during the night. should I be worried, will she be ok?
It is possible that Milu is breathing rapidly due to pain, falling from that height may have left Milu with some permanent injury which occasionally causes some pain; however without examining him I cannot say with any certainty. You should continue to monitor him and look out for any other symptoms, but any head trauma may present with issue later on in life. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
Standard tests include a complete blood count, biochemical profile, and urine analysis. These will help your veterinarian to determine if your cat has an infection or a low red blood cell count. They will also show whether your cat's internal organs are functioning normally. Your veterinarian will also draw a sample of blood to test the amount of oxygen and carbon dioxide in your cat's blood. This will help to determine how severe your cat's breathing difficulty is and whether the problem is in the lungs or somewhere else in the chest. Your veterinarian may also draw blood for a heartworm test. Other diagnostic tools that may be used are X-ray and ultrasound images of the chest, both to examine for an enlarged heart that can lead to heart failure, and to see if the lungs appear normal. The internal structure of the abdomen may also be examined using this method. If there appears to be an accumulation of fluid in the chest, lungs or belly, some of that fluid will be drawn off for analysis.
Without an examination and possibly a blood test, it is difficult to say what the cause for Buddy’s symptoms are; however eclampsia is a possible cause and would require immediate attention from a Veterinarian if this is the case. I am not sure about veterinary care in Jordan but I know that there is a veterinary school in Al Ramtha, Irbid, Jordan if that is close to you if you require veterinary care. https://wagwalking.com/cat/condition/eclampsia- www.just.edu.jo/FacultiesandDepartments/FacultyOfVeterinaryMedicine/Pages/Default.aspx
Queening is a painful process just like childbirth is for humans and some heavy breathing or panting may occur afterwards for a few days due to discomfort. But if you feel that she is straining or in distress you should visit your Veterinarian to check her over to ensure that there isn’t a retained kitten or another issue leading to these symptoms. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
We might have to put my 9 month old cat, Smokey, down for something like this. She's been panting like a dog, she would barely eat, is struggling to drink, she's tired all the time, and she's taking quick breaths (at least 63 breaths per minute). I wish finding a diagnosis didn't cost so much. The veterinarian said she felt a hardness in her stomach but needed to do tests.
The name "Cheetoh cat" probably brings up the image of the laid-back cartoon cheetah named Chester who advertises Cheetos. But it is also a fairly new breed of house cat. According to the International Cheetoh Breeders Association, the Cheetoh is an attempt to breed a cat that looks more like a wild cat than other breeds but is still a gentle house pet. Carol Drymon bred the first Cheetoh in 2001 by crossing a Bengal and an Ocicat. A Cheetoh is a vary large cat, with healthy males reaching 23 pounds. Such a large cat with leopard-like spots may scare strangers, but is quite tame and as safe around children as any other house cat. TICA considers the Cheetoh an experimental breed.
Thank you for your email. I do think that there might be more going on than stress, and kittens are prone to infectious diseases. If you don't trust that veterinarian that you saw, it would be a good idea to find a second opinion, even if you have to travel a bit to do so, as he could have a problem that needs to be treated. You can also call your veterinarian, let them know that he isn't getting better, and see if they have any other recommendations for him.
Without examining Tilly I cannot say for certain whether I would recommend euthanasia or not; but if she is struggling to breathe, seems in pain and your Veterinarian hasn’t recommended any surgical options (due to age or location of tumour) then you may want to think about euthanasia. It is a very difficult decision to make, but you need to look at Tilly’s quality of life and what the future holds for her. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
Without an examination and possibly a blood test, it is difficult to say what the cause for Buddy’s symptoms are; however eclampsia is a possible cause and would require immediate attention from a Veterinarian if this is the case. I am not sure about veterinary care in Jordan but I know that there is a veterinary school in Al Ramtha, Irbid, Jordan if that is close to you if you require veterinary care. https://wagwalking.com/cat/condition/eclampsia- www.just.edu.jo/FacultiesandDepartments/FacultyOfVeterinaryMedicine/Pages/Default.aspx
For instance, the liger’s increased growth rate and enormous size can cause the tigress giving birth to have a difficult delivery, endangering both the mother and her liger cubs, which may be born prematurely or require a Caesarian. Common problems in cubs that survive are neurological disorders, obesity, genetic defects, and a shortened lifespan; though a few have reportedly made it to their twenties, many don’t survive past the age of seven.
Smooth, medium wedge, neither long and tapering nor short and massive. Muzzle is blunt, and part of the total wedge, without exaggerated pinch or whisker break. Top of skull long and flat in profile, gently descending to slightly above the eyes, and continuing at a slight downward angle in a straight line to the tip of the nose. Medium in length. Length of top-head should be greater than length of nose. The face is broad across the eyes due to wide eyeset and thick fur. Muzzle smooth, flowing wedge without prominent whisker pads or whisker pinches. Neck long and slender, but appearing short due to thick fur and high placement of shoulder blades.
One important note to keep in mind with this breed is its love of food. It will eat beyond its need and ask for seconds, making it a sure candidate for weight related conditions if it is allowed to eat as much as it wants. The best prevention is measuring the food and giving it only at assigned times of the day, and making sure that everyone in the house knows that they cannot give the cat too many treats or scraps.
The Russian Blue’s elegant yet muscular body led one cat judge to proclaim him the “Doberman Pinscher of cats.” He has what’s called a semi-foreign body type, meaning it is moderate in shape, falling somewhere between the short, compact body of breeds such as Persians and the sleek angles of Oriental breeds such as the Siamese. The Cat Fanciers Association breed standard for the Russian Blue calls for him to have a head that is a smooth, medium-size wedge shape with a blunt muzzle. The broad wedge of the head and its flat skull are often described as cobra-like, although that is much too dangerous a description for this sweet-natured cat. Regal is perhaps a better term. Large ears are wide at the base with pointed tips, the interior lined with thin, translucent skin, and rounded vivid green eyes are set wide apart. A long, slender neck segues into high shoulder blades and a fine-boned body that is firm and muscular, covered with a short, thick double coat with a plush texture, often described as similar to that of a seal or beaver. If you were to run your fingers through a Russian Blue’s coat, the patterns they made would remain until they were petted smooth. The body is supported by long, fine-boned legs set on small, slightly rounded paws with pads that are a pinky lavender or mauve shade. The tail is long but in proportion to the body.

It's no surprise that such a stately cat has such royal roots, with its sleek, sophisticated demeanor. Although it was exhibited alongside other blue cats, by 1912, the Russian blue was given its own classification, points out Vetstreet, after its introduction to the United States in the early 1900s. However, says the CFA, the breed really took ahold of pet lovers' hearts after World War II, and it has been gaining popularity steadily since the 1960s.
A kitten turned up in my family's yard. Because of her tanish-grey coloring and the black tufts on her ears, we at first wondered if she was a bobcat kitten. A quick look at bobcat traits (she has a long black tail, no ruff of fur around her face) proved that not to be true, and we figured she was just a slightly odd-looking stray domestic cat. We took her in.

The Russian Blue is a robust breed, with firm muscles and an overall dose of good looks. It is physically in the same class as the Korat and Oriental Shorthair -- long, slender, elegant. It is of a medium size, and muscular, but compared to a swimmer in the compactness of its musculature. When it is in full motion and stretched out, one can see that it has a long, graceful neck, but the neck is hidden by thick fur and high set shoulder blades when the cat is sitting, making it look as though it has a short, thick neck.
My cat has always been healthy for 18 years human age until just last week of April my daughter told me that she is blind banging walls, and when I look closely her breathing was soooo rapid and that’s why I took her to the vet the following day (Thursday) and the vet took an x-ray found out that Shellas lungs was covered with fluids, he did not take a blood test that day coz of her conditions, he gave me pills but so far shellas conditions is not getting any better... what should I do????
Interaction between your pet and children should always be supervised to prevent rough treatment or a crying child, but all in all the Foreign Blue makes for an excellent house cat. This breed tends to choose one family member and make it his or her life’s mission to follow that person around and give constant attention to. But this doesn’t mean that they won’t show affection to other household members, particularly to those who need it. These loving cats are known to calm crying babies by clowning around and even patting your face when you feel down.
My female cat, Bella, is almost 18 years old. In the past she has been diagnosed with feline leukemia, but does not show any signs of illness from that, vet said it was dormant and she no doubt has had it since birth. She is strictly an indoor cat. In the last 18 months, she has lost about 3 pounds. Up until a few weeks ago, she was eating and drinking as normal.

This breed does not like change, preferring for things to be uniform and predictable. It can be thrown off when dinnertime is altered, and is nit-picky about hygiene. It will not even enter its litter box if it is dirty. In the early years, this breed developed a reputation at shows for being difficult to work with because of traits like these. The Russian Blue was gentle and happy at home, but at shows it was visibly discontent and temperamental. Popularity declined and fewer Russian Blues were being shown until breeders focused on improving the attitudes of the breed through selective breeding and behavior management (e.g., soft music, recording of show noises, crystals, herbal remedies). This commitment to the breed paid off, and today the Russian Blue is a happy participant at cat shows.


Currently, most authentic Chausies produced are late generation cats with fully domestic temperaments. Their TICA registration certificates will usually indicate that they are "C" generation or "SBT," which nearly always means they are four generations or more beyond the jungle cat (F. chaus). In cases where they are "A" or "B" generation, it is usually because they have been recently outcrossed to another domestic breed to improve specific cosmetic traits, but the cats are nonetheless more than four generations beyond the handful of nondomestic ancestors.

My cat is a 2 year old Male. He is breathing heavily and he doesn't have his mouth open. Everytime he moves he meows in pain, doesn't want me to touch him. He just keeps laying down and cant get comfortable. He was playing with his brother in the middle of the night. He came to bed was fine but I woke up this morning and he doesn't wanna be touched or covered up to stay warm. His ears are freezing cold.


While the Russian Blue loves your company, he is capable of entertaining himself during the day while you are at work. Unlike some active, intelligent breeds, he is not destructive but moves through the house with the lithe grace of a Russian ballerina. When you are at home, his subtle sense of humor and manual dexterity will never fail to entertain. Just make sure you laugh with him, not at him. He has a strong sense of self-worth and doesn’t like being made fun of.
A loss of appetite and lethargy are both vague symptoms but the rapid breathing is concerning, you should visit your Veterinarian for an examination as rapid breathing may be associated with pain, anaemia, heart disease among many other conditions. Without examining Ozzy I cannot determine the specific underlying cause of the symptoms and would recommend that a visit to your Veterinarian be made before the weekend. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
Two days is still early days for treatment but you should start seeing some improvement in the next day or so, I would say to give it the weekend and if there is no improvement in Jinx’s condition you should return to your Veterinarian on Monday for another examination. Improvement in an animal's condition, especially with antibiotics, can be delayed in most cases so unless your Veterinarian said specifically ‘you’ll see improvement over the next 24 hours’ or something similar you should give it three or four days at least. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
Thanks for your advice. I wanted to give recovery feedback. So the symptoms are still going on. I took her to the vet for a control and the vet told me she doesnt hear anything wrong with her breathing, and the palate healed already. The vet thinks the symptoms are from the hot weather. And the blinking ete just happens sometimes, nothing to worry about. I continue watching her, hoping everything will go back to normal.

I got a small Siamese cat(with rhinotracheitis), He started to breathe a bit fast (45/50 breath per minutes) and his heart is at 60 bpm. We just moved into a new place, he started breathing fast a week ago when we were buried in boxes. I thought it was stress, but it didn't stop. He still eat and moves everywhere, his attitude didn't change. We were at the vet maybe 3 months ago for pancreatitis and because he started losing balance (Ataxia/Unbalanced Gait) but we never wanted to check it, because of our money issue. We want to bring him to the vet, but what can we expect the result to be with these information?
There are various different causes for rapid breathing and rapid heart rate which may be caused by stress, poisoning, infections, anaemia, heart disease among many other conditions; if there are behavioural changes like hiding there may be fear or another similar component. Without examining Wagamama I cannot say whether or not there is a cause for concern or not, but you should have your Veterinarian check her over to be on the safe side. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

Thank you for you email. unfortunately, without examining Kai, i can't comment on what might be going on with him. He needs to see his veterinarian to try and determine what is going on with him and how to treat him. If he seems to be in distress and unable to catch his breath, taking him to the emergency clinic tonight is most appropriate. I hope that he is okay.
My 8-month old kitten has always breathed quickly. She now breathes about 50 bpm, but under stress (like in the car) she can breathe up to 80-90 bpm. She has all her vaccines, and had deworming pills as well at about 2 months old. She is an outdoor cat. I’m wondering if I should seek veterinary care, but it’s so expensive - is there any preliminary monitoring I can do at home?
For as long as I can remember my 5 year old cat has intermittent rapid breathing. She doesn't seem bothered by this and she doesn't have any other symptoms when she is breathing quickly. I always forget to ask about this when she is at the vet and her breathing is always normal there. When her breathing is fast it's around 70 75 breaths per minute and normal is around 32. The intermittent fast breathing last maybe a few minutes and then goes back to normal.
Little is known about the origin of the Russian Blue breed, though stories are legendary. Many believe the Russian Blue is a natural breed originating from the Archangel Isles in northern Russia, where the long winters developed a cat with a dense, plush coat. Rumors also abound that the Russian Blue breed descended from the cats kept by the Russian Czars. Assuming the Russian Blue did migrate from northern Russia, it was likely via ship to England and northern Europe in the mid 1860s.
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