Treatment for congestive heart failure is aimed at managing the medical cause of the condition as well as relieving symptoms associated with fluid build up in the lungs, pleural space, and abdomen. In a few situations, once the cause has been treated (such as hyperthyroidism), the heart may recover, however, most cases of CHF are irreversible, but it may be managed to slow down the progress. Stabilising your cat if he has fluid build up in the lungs or pleural cavity, relieving symptoms and this may include:
So beloved was this breed to the Egyptians, that they are evident in their ancient artwork — and it’s easy to see why. Their mascara-like markings, stunning green eyes, and elegance are all noted by TICA. The shy, loyal breed with keen senses tends to have a “naturally worried” look, which is perhaps a nod to their aversion to loud noises. Hillspet.com says they enjoy a perch — like a bookshelf or fridge — from which to survey their domain, which most certainly belongs to them.
Sorry to hear your kitty is scratching like that! Does he show any signs of skin infections, fleas, mites, wounds from other cats? The cone could have stressed him further, yes, if he was scratching already because of tension/anxiety. Open sores can get infected, especially when left untreated and scratched further. We would recommend taking your kitty to the vet for a diagnosis. They will be able to provide you the advice and medication your kitty might need. Best wishes!
This is about my cat. He was fine when he was a kitten other than being feral and not used to people. But about two months ago, he started doing this thing where he is breathing fine and all one minute and the next it sounds like his breath is coming out in quick bursts almost like coughing. And it always goes for about 8 or so bursts of breath. Is this something I should take him to the vet about ?
Thank you for your email. Without examining her or knowing more about her condition and history, I can't determine what might be going on with Mochi, but those are signs that she needs to see a veterinarian as soon as possible, as they will be able to examine her, decide what tests or treatments might be necessary, and treat her so that she feels better. I hope that all goes well for her.
They appeared under the name Archangel cat and competed against other shorthair cats. Though they are a shorthaired cat breed, it is not believed that they are related in any way to other shorthaired solid blue breeds (Korat, Chartreux, and British Blue) as their coats are very different. In 1912, the GCCF (Governing Council of Cat Fancy) recognized the breed as a breed of its own and gave it its own class called Foreign Blue. The breed grew in popularity but World War II almost completely wiped out the breed. After the war, breeders set forth to revive the breed and began to outcross with other breeds. Russian Blues were mated with British Blues and blue point Siamese. 

If Penny’s resting respiratory rate is above 40 breaths per minute, you should visit your Veterinarian for an examination; even if her bloodwork was good six weeks ago, something may have changed in that time. Without examining her and listing to her breathing and heart, I cannot start to narrow in on a specific cause; however the groaning is also concerning. Your Veterinarian will check her over and will treat is required. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
My cat is recovering from having a tumor taken off of his neck. He is not thriving and today i found that he has blood in his urine. He is also breathing in short bursts. The doc said unless he seems very uncomfortable, it can wait till tomorrow, MOnday. I want the cat to see his usual vet, instead of taking him to emergency. What would you do? I don’t want him to suffer, so i gave him some pain meds.
We have a 9 week old Bengal kitten that it was discovered yesterday at our vet appointment that he has a grade 4 cardiac murmur. He has been eating and moderately playing like normal. Tonight his breathing is pretty rapid - ranging from 60-80 bpm. He’s sleeping peacefully now. Anything I should do? I did call a cardiologist, but we can’t get an appointment until July and even if we could, we can’t afford the visit. Looking for help!
Your cat’s health is of the utmost importance, and at some point, most owners are faced with a confusing medical issue they must confront. Do cat’s normally breathe fast? Yes but only in very specific conditions. If you’ve found yourself looking at your furry friend and wondering “My cat is breathing fast – what should I do?” your next step is to make an informed decision of how to react to this respiratory difficulty.

While oxygen is being transferred to the red blood cells, carbon dioxide is transferred from the red blood cells into the lungs. It is then carried out through the nose through a process referred to as expiration. This cyclic motion of breathing is controlled by the respiratory center in the brain and nerves in the chest. Diseases that affect the respiratory system, or the respiratory center in the brain, can bring about breathing difficulties. Troubled or labored breathing is medically referred to as dyspnea, and excessively rapid breathing is medically referred to as tachypnea (also, polypnea).
The Russian blue is a sweet-tempered, loyal cat who will follow her owner everywhere, so don't be surprised if she greets you at the front door! While she has a tendency to attach to one pet parent in particular, she demonstrates affection with her whole family and demands it in return. It's said that Russian blues train their owners rather than the owners training them, a legend that's been proven true time and again.
Queening is a painful process just like childbirth is for humans and some heavy breathing or panting may occur afterwards for a few days due to discomfort. But if you feel that she is straining or in distress you should visit your Veterinarian to check her over to ensure that there isn’t a retained kitten or another issue leading to these symptoms. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
Hi, My cat fell from our 3rd floor window 1 month ago. Hopefully i found him immediately and brought her to the vet. She had her mouth bleeding. The vet did an injection and xrayed her. She only had a palate wound, but the vet said that it was mostly on the hard palate and that she doesn’t need any stitches if she eats normally. Luckily when we got back home she immediately ate, drank water and went to the toilet. I want to think everything went back to normal but sometimes i find her breathing very fast, today she even panted when we were playing around and also i notice her sometimes blinking only one eye. When i asked our vet she says if the cat has a problem with her lungs she would breath rapidly all the time and not just sometimes. She said everything should be fine. But i am still worried, should i be?
It is difficult to say what is causing the rapid breathing or the seizures a few weeks ago, a slightly elevated white blood cell count may indicate infection or inflammation but isn’t really diagnostic of anything specific (a differential count may help). Monitor Molly over the next few days especially when the antibiotics are finished to see if there are any other symptoms developing which may help narrow in on a cause. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
It is possible that Bone has bronchitis, bacterial or fungal pneumonia, a parasite, or cancer. Any of those things are possible. Since he seems to have improved on the antibiotics and steroid injection, it might be a good idea to have a recheck for him. Your veterinarian may want to recheck x-rays to compare for any improvement, and may be able to give him further treatment.
This is the most frequent email we get from exotic cat owners: “Hey, I’m really in over my head here!  I got this thing as an infant. I bottle-raised it. Everything was great. But I can no longer handle this cat. I cannot housebreak it. It tries to attack people. I just don’t know what to do with it.'” This was an actual quote about a Serval, but we have had hundreds of similar letters about every kind of exotic cat.
Sharleen ear temperature change hot to cold 4 times overnight. Sound stuffy when purr. Breath heavily and urinate lots and often last few weeks. Took her to the vet for blood work and check up today. She seem worse and in pain. Lower lip is now swollen, right front leg a little limping. Not active all afternoon. Night fall and she seem restless. What can I do to ease her pain while waiting for blood work result?
A stray cat showed up at my house a couple days ago. She is very thin and I've started her on small throughout the day. She is eating, drinking, voiding, and stooling okay. Eyes, ears, and nose are all clear. The only major thing I've noticed is rapid breathing when purring or stress (loud noises make her skittish). I have pets of my own and really cannot afford a costly vet visit, and our local shelter and a rescue are overwhelmed with companion animals at this time. I've started her on antibiotics and am keeping her isolated from my own pets. My daughter has asthma and this looks very similar. Any advice? I've found out that her previous owner passed away and a neighbour tried to bring her to her house, the cat bolted and they couldn't find her, 3 weeks later she showed up at my place. She is a spayed 5 year old female who was up to date on shots.
Russian Blues like their daily routine to be just so, and dislike household changes more than the average cat— and the average cat dislikes household changes a lot. They particularly dislike changes to their dinner schedule, and will make you aware of their displeasure. They are also fastidious about their litter boxes and will complain or may even go elsewhere if they’re not spic and span.

Cuddling may be in a ragdoll’s DNA. Developed as a breed in California in the 1960s, says TICA, they tend to collapse — just like a ragdoll — into the arms of willing snugglers. They’re described as relaxed, happy, quiet cats that are usually tolerant of other animals and children who want to carry them around. Like dogs, Ragdolls can be friendly, smart and have been taught by some owners to fetch.


Finally, the Governing Council of the Cat Fancy recognized the breed, and in 1912, the Russian Blue was granted a class of its own. Any progress in the breed's popularity was to come to an abrupt end, when World War II was waged over most of Europe, killing most of the Russian Blues. Breeders intent on bringing the Russian Blue line back began crossing the cats with British Blues and Bluepoint Siamese. At the same time, Scandinavian breeders crossed the blue cats from Finland with similarly colored Siamese cats.
Please do not ask us to sell you a kitten, nor to refer you to a broker, dealer or breeder.  These animals do not make good pets and if you have the experience and expertise to care for one for the rest of it’s life, then you should be donating your time to caring for the hundreds of unwanted ones who have ended up in real sanctuaries.  Real sanctuaries do not breed.
A kitten turned up in my family's yard. Because of her tanish-grey coloring and the black tufts on her ears, we at first wondered if she was a bobcat kitten. A quick look at bobcat traits (she has a long black tail, no ruff of fur around her face) proved that not to be true, and we figured she was just a slightly odd-looking stray domestic cat. We took her in.
Thoracic drainage tubes to remove fluids from the pleural cavity. Local anesthesia and IV sedation are administered to keep your cat comfortable during this procedure. Tubes will be flushed several times a day with 0.9% saline or lactated Ringers solution warmed to body temperature to wash the chest cavity (pleural lavage). Tubes will need to remain in place for between 4-6 days.
As with so many cat breeds, little is known of the Russian Blue’s origins. He probably does come from Russia—his thick coat is surely that of a cat from colder climes—and he is considered a natural breed, meaning Matushka Nature created him, not the handiwork of humans. The Russian Blue’s development as a breed, however, took place primarily in Britain and Scandinavia, starting in the late nineteenth century, when showing and breeding cats became a popular activity.
Sorry to hear your kitty is scratching like that! Does he show any signs of skin infections, fleas, mites, wounds from other cats? The cone could have stressed him further, yes, if he was scratching already because of tension/anxiety. Open sores can get infected, especially when left untreated and scratched further. We would recommend taking your kitty to the vet for a diagnosis. They will be able to provide you the advice and medication your kitty might need. Best wishes!
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