Serval or descendents of servals such as the Savannah F 1 are tough cats to domesticate. They are technically still a wild animal with wild attributes. They can leap 10 -15 feet, with claws like a Bobcat. They are only partial to one owner which it will defend like a child, so i a stranger gets close….watch out. Cost if anyone is interested is approximately $5000 – $7500. Not a cheap price to make a potentially bad decision.
Hypoglycemia is a life-threatening condition in which the blood sugar levels drop dangerously low. The pancreatic beta cells produce the hormone insulin which helps to move glucose from food into the cells (for energy).  It is not a disease in itself, but it is a symptom of an underlying disorder. Causes include excessive insulin administration in the diabetic cat, decreased glucose production (missed meal, vomiting, certain medications, glycogen storage disease), and excessive glucose consumption due to sepsis (bacterial infection of the blood).
This breathing may be normal for Gracie, or may be a sign of distress and not being able to get oxygen the way that she needs to. Since I cannot assess her or her respiratory system, it would be best to have her examined by a veterinarian. They'll be able to look at her, listen to her heart and lungs, and assess her general health to see if she is having any breathing issues that need attention.
A normal healthy cat will take 20-30 regular breaths per minute. The air travels into your cat’s lungs and is used to oxygenate the blood, which is then circulated throughout your cat’s vital organs. When a cat is suffering from rapid breathing, this breath rate increases and often becomes irregular, or shallow. This can often be an indication that your cat is not able to bring enough oxygen into the lungs to supply their body’s need. Rapid breathing is a symptom that can be caused by a number of illnesses or injuries. Since regular breathing is vital, if your cat is suffering from rapid breathing (also known as tachypnea) it is a serious and life threatening condition and you should seek immediate veterinary care.
My kitten Rupert is only 7 weeks old and he started breathing rapidly the night before. At times he groans and breathes with his mouth open. He feels and sounds most uncomfortable when he is being held, but still has discomfort if laying down for a long time. I'm not sure if he has a cold, or if its something wrong with his lungs? He had just been in the emergency just 2 days ago for low blood sugar, but he wasn't doing this at that time. What do I do?
My cat (8-9 months) just got spayed 2 days ago. I have another cat so to be sure the wound was safe we got her a vest instead of a cone. she came home that afternoon and she was very quiet and would not walk around, we thought it was normal due to the vest and anesthesia. yesterday we noticed she isn't eating, drinking or going to the litterbox on her own. she only wants to lay down and sleep. If we bring her to the water, food, and litter box she'll do her things and just lay down again. we kept thinking she was just tired or did not like to walk with the vest so we went to sleep this morning o notice she is not in her bed but inside the transporter box, and breathing quite fast. My boyfriend took her to the vet, to do an X-ray and they said she had some pulmonary infection but they can't do the necessary tests to pinpoint exactly what is the issue because it requires anesthesia and she just had one a few days ago. they gave her some medicine bt it did not work and they are moving her to the vet hospital so she can have someone with her during the night. should I be worried, will she be ok?
As the CFA further explains, the Russian blue cat made its first public appearance in 1875 in a very regal way: exhibited at London's Crystal Palace as the "Archangel Cat." The Crystal Palace was constructed under the leadership of Prince Albert, husband of Queen Victoria, as the location of The Great Exhibition in 1851 and thereafter was used to exhibit items of interest (living and otherwise) to the people of Victorian London, and the attractions held international appeal as well. By middle of the nineteenth century, "cat shows" had become regular and popular events.
My cat was run over nearly a month ago. She had her tail amputated. She then come home and developed a lump in her belly. She went back to the vets and had surgery the lump was removed and sent to the lab for testing. It come back with relation to trauma of the car accident. Then last Friday i took her cone off to eat her dinner i went upstairs to have a shower and left her unattended when i come down her cut and drain marks were bleeding. I took her back to the vets who cleaned her up and sent us home! Sunday i noticed she was very quiet and not herself. I took her to the vets last night and she was shaking and her breathing was up at 48 breathes per minute! the vet gave her a 2 week antibiotic injection and has sent us home! today Wednesday i measured her breathing again and it is still at 48 a minute. I have called the vet and said that if she is still the same tomorrow then bring her back. How long does it take for the antibiotic to start working and will this then slow her breathing down? Thank you in advance
Regardless, you should visit your Veterinarian or an Emergency Veterinarian to examine Gizmo since she should be eating and drinking normally after this routine surgery and the ‘seizure like’ activity is also concerning; the moderate increase in respiration may be due to discomfort from surgery or due to something more serious. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
It is possible that Bone has bronchitis, bacterial or fungal pneumonia, a parasite, or cancer. Any of those things are possible. Since he seems to have improved on the antibiotics and steroid injection, it might be a good idea to have a recheck for him. Your veterinarian may want to recheck x-rays to compare for any improvement, and may be able to give him further treatment.
Please do not ask us to sell you a kitten, nor to refer you to a broker, dealer or breeder.  These animals do not make good pets and if you have the experience and expertise to care for one for the rest of it’s life, then you should be donating your time to caring for the hundreds of unwanted ones who have ended up in real sanctuaries.  Real sanctuaries do not breed.
If Squeakers is acting normally otherwise and doesn't seem to be having any respiratory distress, this may just be normal for her. If she hasn't had a checkup in a while, it would be a good idea to have her checked out, regardless, as a veterinarian can listen to her heart and lungs, and assess her general health and whether this breathing pattern is normal, or a potential problem. I hope that all goes well for her!
In 1900, Carl Hagenbeck crossed a female leopard with a Bengal tiger. The stillborn offspring had a mixture of spots, rosettes and stripes. Henry Scherren wrote, “A male tiger from Penang served two female Indian leopards, and twice with success. Details are not given and the story concludes somewhat lamely. ‘The leopardess dropped her cubs prematurely, the embryos were in the first stage of development and were scarcely as big as young mice.’ Of the second leopardess there is no mention.”
It all depends on the underlying cause; poisoning would be a concern for the sudden onset of these symptoms in a short time frame in a young cat, however without examining Buffy I cannot be certain of the underlying cause. You should try to rinse out her mouth with plain water and try to keep her still, if you have an Emergency Veterinarian open near you, you should visit regardless of distance and cost. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
There are various different causes for rapid breathing which may include infections, pain, heart disorders, dehydration among other causes; a cat’s respiration should be below 30 breaths per minute when at rest but if it is significantly above this rate at rest I would suggest visiting your Veterinarian for an examination to determine a cause. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
×