Grooming the Archangel Blue is easier as compared to other short-haired varieties. The dense, silky coat won’t shed as much and owners can enjoy the plush feel of the Foreign Blue. This breed is generally easy to maintain in terms of grooming and health. You will need to prepare several essentials, such as a cat-safe toothpaste, a toothbrush and other creature comforts. These items are available to purchase online or at the local pet store. For brushing the coat, you’ll need a medium toothed comb to keep the coat luxurious and smooth.
When the Russian Blue cat sees his favorite family member, though, it’s a whole different matter. This cat will follow the individual around the whole house and can sometimes hitch a ride on that person’s shoulder. The Foreign Blue greets the owner at the door and is sensitive to your mood, i.e., with playtime or just by settling down next to you. Owners rarely hear the cat’s voice unless it’s mealtime. Some of the things an Archangel Blue appreciates are a hearty game of fetch, a window with a great outdoor view and pats on the head.
As with all non-domestic hybrid source breeds, some Chausies may inherit intestinal tracts similar to that of the non-domestic ancestors. The intestinal tract may be a little shorter than that of the traditional domestic cat. A shorter intestinal tract is thought to be less capable of processing ingredients derived from plants. That would include any kind of cereal, as well as vegetables, herbs, and spices. Those ingredients may serve as triggers for chronic intestinal inflammation and eventually lead to chronic inflammatory bowel disease that is perpetuated by multiple allergies to proteins in commercial cat food.[9] Regardless of the cause, Chausies do seem somewhat prone to developing food allergies. To prevent this, breeders advise Chausie owners to feed only very high quality commercial cat foods, containing as little of plant-derived ingredients as possible or advise feeding homemade raw or cooked meat diets with appropriate supplementation. If homemade diets are fed, it should be with the guidance of someone experienced in preparing them, because meat by itself does not contain all the nutrients that Chausies require.

One of the features of the short, silky, dense coat is the plush feel and the lack of constant shedding. The coat color is an even, bright blue, and each guard hair appears as if dipped in silver – giving the Russian a silvery sheen and lustrous appearance. Russian Blues are registered in only one color – blue – and one coat length – short. In contrast to the blue coat, the Russian Blue has large, rounded, wide-set eyes that are vivid green. The head shape is a broad, medium wedge with a flat top and straight nose in profile. Large ears are wide at the base and set rakishly toward the side of the head. The Russian Blue is a medium-sized cat, fine-boned, long, and firmly muscled.


Our orange tabby kitten 11 weeks is having "episodes" of rapid breathing and horrible watery eyes. It starts nightly at about 5pm. It's a constant drip like a faucet is on and he is drenched. Starts from the right eye and then the left starts going. It drips down his face into his nose and then into the sides of his mouth where it pools until it drips out. During this he is lethargic and has severe rapid breathing. No fever, no diarrhea, no weight loss. lungs sound clear. eating and drinking water. Very playful like a kitten. It just this episode once a night in the evening.
I hope that you can help me At school my granddaughter is currently (she is 8) working on wild cats. I have volunteered to make her a book of photographs and information on cats through the alphabet. There are two that I have not been able to find (hours on Google) V & X I was wondering if someone can help on a name (or Latin) for an obscure feline or subspecies. I think I will have to give up on the X but I’ve bent the rules a bit and will use Xausted and shown a lion sleeping in… Read more »
I was under the impression that a Bobcat (meaning the wild kind) would be thinking dinner if he ran across a domestic cat. Bobcats are also so much bigger than a normal housecat. I can't imagine them breeding. Do they really breed in the "wild?" I got to see a bobcat closeup at a cat rescue (the owner used to do wildlife rescue and this guy couldn't go back to the wild) and I just can't imagine him wanting to breed with a domestic cat, as opposed to eating it.

Okay so we’ve had our cat since being a kitten and she’s always been very scatty as we think she was abused, due to getting her and her having marks on her neck, but her breathing has always been rapid. (80 resps per minute) but in herself, she’s like any normal cat. She’s very friendly, not in any form of pain, is this something that needs to be addressed?
Resting respiratory rate in a cat is around 15-40 breaths per minute, if Alaska is breathing more than that then it may be indicative of some underlying medical issue; without examining Alaska it is difficult for me to say specifically the cause or any treatment. An increase in respiratory effort may be attributable to pain, fluid in the lungs, narrowed airways among other issues; if you have recently changed food you should try changing back again but I would recommend having your Veterinarian check Alaska over to be on the safe side. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
Without an examination and possibly a blood test, it is difficult to say what the cause for Buddy’s symptoms are; however eclampsia is a possible cause and would require immediate attention from a Veterinarian if this is the case. I am not sure about veterinary care in Jordan but I know that there is a veterinary school in Al Ramtha, Irbid, Jordan if that is close to you if you require veterinary care. https://wagwalking.com/cat/condition/eclampsia- www.just.edu.jo/FacultiesandDepartments/FacultyOfVeterinaryMedicine/Pages/Default.aspx
Thank you for your email. Since Tortie was just seen by your veterinarian and was deemed healthy, her periodic bouts of rapid breathing may be normal, and may follow bouts of exertion or anxiety. If the periods that she is breathing rapidly become more frequent, or more severe, it would be a good idea to have her seen by your veterinarian and examined to make sure that she is okay. It might be helpful to video the episode, since she doesn't seem to breathe that way when she is at an appointment. I hope that she is okay!
There are many different options for analgesia in cats, however without knowing which medication was provided for pain relief I cannot give you an indication of how long it would be effective for as we have many different products on the market with different active ingredients, mechanisms of action and duration. A respiratory rate above 35 or 40 breaths per minute is expected as a result of discomfort or pain, but without examining Chester or knowing what was administered I cannot give you any specific information. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
Treatment of rapid breathing in your cat will be tailored to the specific cause of the condition. In the case of infections, pneumonia, or fluid filling the lungs, your vet will prescribe strong antibiotics to help fight off the infections. In many cases, your cat may need to be hospitalized so that they can be provided round the clock supportive care such as fluids, IV antibiotics, and administration of oxygen.

The PIxiebob breed began as a result of natural mating. Carol Ann Brewer observed bob-tailed cats in the Cascade Mountains of Washington state. She adopted one of these cats in 1985, who then mated with a neighbor's cat. She obtained more of the "legend cats," bob-tailed local cats that somewhat resembled bobcats, and are thought to be results of natural matings between bobcats and domestic cats, although no proof exists. Pixiebobs are tall cats with back legs slightly longer than the front legs. They have thick double coats that may be short or long. Breed standards allow for up to seven toes in a PIxiebob, the only championship breed allowing for polydactly. Pixiebobs gained championship status with the TICA in 1998. Although Pixiebobs are often stone-faced like a wild cat, they are loyal and make good pets.
There are many possible causes for a cat to feel lethargic with an increased respiratory rate which may include infections, gastrointestinal obstruction (increased breathing rate due to pain), anaemia (less red blood cells lead to an increase in respiration) among other causes; you should keep a close eye on Buddy, but it would be wise to visit your Veterinarian to help narrow in on a specific cause for the lethargy as there are many possible causes. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

As with so many cat breeds, little is known of the Russian Blue’s origins. He probably does come from Russia—his thick coat is surely that of a cat from colder climes—and he is considered a natural breed, meaning Matushka Nature created him, not the handiwork of humans. The Russian Blue’s development as a breed, however, took place primarily in Britain and Scandinavia, starting in the late nineteenth century, when showing and breeding cats became a popular activity.
There are a few possible causes of rapid breathing or increased respiration rate in cats which may be due to allergies, infection, foreign objects, sign of pain, other pulmonary problems among other issues. It is important that any serious causes or ruled out or treated, it would be best to have your Veterinarian give Darcy a check up to be on the safe side on your next visit as 80 breaths per minute is around double the physiological range. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM www.vet.cornell.edu/fhc/Health_Information/dyspnea.cfm

If Squeakers is acting normally otherwise and doesn't seem to be having any respiratory distress, this may just be normal for her. If she hasn't had a checkup in a while, it would be a good idea to have her checked out, regardless, as a veterinarian can listen to her heart and lungs, and assess her general health and whether this breathing pattern is normal, or a potential problem. I hope that all goes well for her!
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