My cat is recovering from having a tumor taken off of his neck. He is not thriving and today i found that he has blood in his urine. He is also breathing in short bursts. The doc said unless he seems very uncomfortable, it can wait till tomorrow, MOnday. I want the cat to see his usual vet, instead of taking him to emergency. What would you do? I don’t want him to suffer, so i gave him some pain meds. 

Don’t let the powerful, sleek features of the Foreign Blue fool you. This breed is generally shy, quiet and very gentle by nature. It’s more reserved than playful but that doesn’t mean the breed enjoys a good romp every now and then. The Russian Blue is intelligent and leans towards games that have a “throw and catch” mechanism. You’ll soon find yourself playing an endless game of fetch if you’re not careful! They are also attracted by sunbeams, laser pointers and love to go chase their favorite toys.
For instance, the liger’s increased growth rate and enormous size can cause the tigress giving birth to have a difficult delivery, endangering both the mother and her liger cubs, which may be born prematurely or require a Caesarian. Common problems in cubs that survive are neurological disorders, obesity, genetic defects, and a shortened lifespan; though a few have reportedly made it to their twenties, many don’t survive past the age of seven.
There are other reasons, in the real world, why it doesn’t work, which includes the fact that human – big cat conflict is one of the main reasons cats are wiped out of areas. Captive breeding not only selectively chooses animals that are least fit for the wild but also conditions the cats to not fear humans. That increases the conflict and the result is that not only would the offending cat be killed, but likely any wild cat seen in the area would be hunted down and killed in a case of mistaken identity. That escalates the extinction of cats in the wild.
Thank you for your email. Since Tortie was just seen by your veterinarian and was deemed healthy, her periodic bouts of rapid breathing may be normal, and may follow bouts of exertion or anxiety. If the periods that she is breathing rapidly become more frequent, or more severe, it would be a good idea to have her seen by your veterinarian and examined to make sure that she is okay. It might be helpful to video the episode, since she doesn't seem to breathe that way when she is at an appointment. I hope that she is okay!
The heavy breathing is likely due to the pain which Blaze is experiencing, without examining him I cannot give you any specific indication of what has occurred but would recommend that you visit your Veterinarian for an examination to determine whether it is due to a traumatic injury from playing or from another cause. Visit your Veterinarian before they close for the weekend. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
Still, due to their characteristic nervousness, Russian Blue’s generally did not perform particularly well at shows, leading to a decline in their popularity into the 1980s. When breeders focused their attention on improving the personality of the breed through selective breeding, and by training their kittens to stay calm in a show environment, the Russian Blue once again became an attention getter and award winner. Since the 1990s the Russian Blue has been winning regional and national awards consistently, and today it enjoys a well-deserved and steady popularity.

It’s a good idea to keep a Russian Blue as an indoor-only cat to protect him from diseases spread by other cats, attacks by dogs or coyotes, and the other dangers that face cats who go outdoors, such as being hit by a car. Russian Blues who go outdoors also run the risk of being stolen by someone who would like to have such a beautiful cat without paying for it.
If Squeakers is acting normally otherwise and doesn't seem to be having any respiratory distress, this may just be normal for her. If she hasn't had a checkup in a while, it would be a good idea to have her checked out, regardless, as a veterinarian can listen to her heart and lungs, and assess her general health and whether this breathing pattern is normal, or a potential problem. I hope that all goes well for her!
To know for sure you’ll need to see the pedigree and your cat should have been registered with a cat association. A pedigree is a family tree going back four years or more that contains the full names of the cats, all of which should be Russian Blues or cat breeds that are approved for breeding Russian Blues by the cat association. That sounds awfully complicated but all purebred cat cats are registered in that way in the West (Europe and North America). There are a number of cat associations. Hope this helps.

During this same time, Scandinavian breeders crossed similar looking blue coated cats from Finland with Siamese cats. The cats had emerald green eyes. Russian Blues made their way to North America in the early 1900s but it took some time for breeding programs to begin in North America. The first Russian Blue was not registered with the CFA until 1949. In 1964, GC Maja Acre Igor II, a Russian Blue, won CFA Grand Champion. In 1965, British breeders began to express concern over the evolving appearance of the Russian Blue cat breed. Russian Blues were bred with the similar looking Scandinavian cats that had beautiful emerald eyes and the Russian Blue look and personality that was desired was finally achieved.
Thank you for you email. unfortunately, without examining Kai, i can't comment on what might be going on with him. He needs to see his veterinarian to try and determine what is going on with him and how to treat him. If he seems to be in distress and unable to catch his breath, taking him to the emergency clinic tonight is most appropriate. I hope that he is okay.
So, my cat has been breathing fast for the last two days. She has been eating, drinking water and peeing/pooping normally as it seems... We had a big clean up in the house and all of us (humans and cats) were sneezing for a while so that is one of the possibilities, I guess...The other thing is that we had the sand of the sand box changed to one with a smell so maybe that was giving her allergies or something... These are two possibilities but I'm still worried. Do you think I should be concerned?
Cats can also develop fluid build up in the chest that is localized outside the lungs. This happens in an area named the pleural space. When fluid accumulates in the pleural space, the lungs cannot inflate as much as they should. Your cat will develop shortness of breath and labored breathing as more fluid fills this space. According to VCA Animal Hospitals, some causes of pleural effusion include:
Los Angeles cat breeder Judy Sugden has been working since the late eighties to breed a house cat that resembles a tiger. The result is the Toyger, a registered breed that has a lineage beginning with domestic shorthairs and Bengals selected for their markings. Toygers are now available from breeders all over the world. The breed is still in development, and TICA now has the toyger classified as a championship breed. 

The goal of breeding the Serengeti Cat is to produce a cat that resembles the wild Serval but does not contain any Serval bloodline. The first Serengeti Cat was bred by Karen Sausman in 1994 by crossing a Bengal and an Oriental Shorthair. This "foundation cat" and its progeny have been bred with many other types of cats to improve the breed—but no Servals. However, its lineage does include the Asian Leopard Cat whose genes contributed to its Bengal Cat ancestor. Serengeti Cats have long ears and long legs like a Serval, and a neck that does not taper where it meets the head. They are agile, active, and vocal. TICA classifies this cat as an advanced new breed.
Rapid breathing may be caused by a variety of different issues which may include traumatic injury and pain; however if there has been a puncture wound to the chest or neck which is compromising the respiratory tract, it should be treated as a medical emergency. You should keep Grace calm for now but visit a Veterinarian as soon as one is open if she’s having difficulty breathing. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
Hybrids have always been popular. They make people feel connected with the wilderness outside. We can’t all own lions and tigers (nor should we), but so many people want little felines that resemble their larger, exotic cousins. Some breeders have begun breeding smaller wild species with domestic cats to create beautiful hybrids that are safe for the average cat owner to live with. Although hybrids are still controversial, there is no denying how unique and beautiful they are. Take a look at the most popular hybrids below.
I was under the impression that a Bobcat (meaning the wild kind) would be thinking dinner if he ran across a domestic cat. Bobcats are also so much bigger than a normal housecat. I can't imagine them breeding. Do they really breed in the "wild?" I got to see a bobcat closeup at a cat rescue (the owner used to do wildlife rescue and this guy couldn't go back to the wild) and I just can't imagine him wanting to breed with a domestic cat, as opposed to eating it.
The physical appearance of the Archangel is so appealing that you, family members and guests will be drawn to the feline right away. The silver-tinged blue coat, accompanied by intelligent, slightly sloped green eyes add elegance and ambiance to any room. Once you get to know your cat and the Foreign Blue accepts, then it becomes evident that they make the perfect pets. Their intelligent and playful nature will go a long way towards a fulfilling relationship in any household.
All big cat species spawn on grass blocks at light levels of 9 or more with at least 2 block space above. Some species can only spawn in certain biomes; leopards and panthers spawn in jungles, forests and their variants; lions and tigers spawn in plains and forests; and snow leopards spawn in cold biomes. Lions and tigers also spawn more frequently than panthers. There is a 1/20 chance of a white lion, lioness or tiger spawning, and a lower chance for a white cub to spawn.
Cuddling may be in a ragdoll’s DNA. Developed as a breed in California in the 1960s, says TICA, they tend to collapse — just like a ragdoll — into the arms of willing snugglers. They’re described as relaxed, happy, quiet cats that are usually tolerant of other animals and children who want to carry them around. Like dogs, Ragdolls can be friendly, smart and have been taught by some owners to fetch.

The TICA Chausie breed standard allows three colors: solid black, black grizzled tabby, and black (a.k.a. brown) ticked tabby.[8] Because the Chausie breed is relatively new, Chausies are still frequently born that have a variety of other colors and patterns, and they make wonderful pets. However, only the three permissible colors are considered ideal. Only cats in the three permissible colors can be entered in new breed classes at cat shows, and only the three colors will be eligible eventually for championship classes. Gold or yellow eye color is preferred, though yellower and lighter shades of green are allowed.


It’s a good idea to keep a Russian Blue as an indoor-only cat to protect him from diseases spread by other cats, attacks by dogs or coyotes, and the other dangers that face cats who go outdoors, such as being hit by a car. Russian Blues who go outdoors also run the risk of being stolen by someone who would like to have such a beautiful cat without paying for it.
Our orange tabby kitten 11 weeks is having "episodes" of rapid breathing and horrible watery eyes. It starts nightly at about 5pm. It's a constant drip like a faucet is on and he is drenched. Starts from the right eye and then the left starts going. It drips down his face into his nose and then into the sides of his mouth where it pools until it drips out. During this he is lethargic and has severe rapid breathing. No fever, no diarrhea, no weight loss. lungs sound clear. eating and drinking water. Very playful like a kitten. It just this episode once a night in the evening.
My daughters cat is mainly an inside cat but goes outside on occasion, 3 days ago she went outside to have a sniff when she spotted another cat and went bolting after it , in panic my daughter and I went running after her when we retrieved her she started vomiting up what I guessed was stomach acid due to the fact her body was not prepared or designed for that fast bolt. My daughter let her distress and calm down. Later in the evening we noticed she was still breathing very rapidly like she was when we retrieved her we thought maybe she was still highly stressed and that it may go away by morning. Morning came and I had work my daughter was looking after her cat and her condition had not changed my daughter tried feeding the cat her favourite treat ham which she usually can’t get enough of and now she ate one little bit and left the rest which is very out of character , my daughter told me this when I got home so I tired to feed the cat some dinner and she wouldn’t touch it this is when my daughter and started to feel really worried. We wanted to take her to the vet the next day but unfortunately all of them were closed due to it being a Sunday and we noticed she hadn’t used her litter and hadn’t been drinking unless my daughter fed water to her though a syringe. It is the middle of the night now when I’m writing this and she is still rapidly breathing and still hasn’t eaten for 2days please any help would be appreciated this cat is everything to my daughter thank you I hope to hear from you soon
Aside from having a healthy diet and a healthy bathroom break, he's just a very extremely playful kitten, because he doesn't have any other symptoms after he's playing (falling over and not wanting to move after, no panting, no staggering when he walks, etc.) I don't know if I should be worried because he doesn't cry or mew or chew on any place on his body to indicate he's in any pain. And since he is still young, he hasn't been vaccinated or fixed yet, but that will happen when he's a few months older. He still has his milk teeth, which are perfect. No abnormalities or imperfections.
Hello, my 20 year old brother stepped on our [probably] 7-8 week kitten, she's breathing rapidly now, I don't know what to feed her but it's been at least a while since she was squished, she's acting normal but still is breathing oddly, I don't know what to feed her as well cause I'm scared it might damage her teeth or something, and I can't afford a vet.
Anemia is a condition characterised by a reduced number of red blood (also known as erythrocytes) cells in the blood. Is not a disease in itself but a symptom of an underlying condition. It can be due to the premature destruction of the red blood cells, decreased production (due to cancers, kidney disease, certain infections or drugs), blood loss, tumours, blood clotting disorders and parasites such as fleas and hookworm.

There are various causes for rapid breathing with pain being a common cause; infections, foreign bodies, heart conditions, allergies among other conditions may also cause rapid breathing. It may be worth trying to get Possum into the bathroom whilst you take a shower to see if the warm humid air helps to open her airway; otherwise we are a little bit stuck for a cause. If the cause was due to a blocked nose, your Veterinarian would have detected that on the physical examination. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

Thank you for your email. I do think that there might be more going on than stress, and kittens are prone to infectious diseases. If you don't trust that veterinarian that you saw, it would be a good idea to find a second opinion, even if you have to travel a bit to do so, as he could have a problem that needs to be treated. You can also call your veterinarian, let them know that he isn't getting better, and see if they have any other recommendations for him.

Origin: The exact country of origin is unknown but the Russian Blue first appeared in cat shows in London. Though, it is widely believed that the breed is most likely from Russia because their thick double coat suggests they had been well adapted to living in very cold climates. The common story is that British sailors fell in love with this breed of cat on their travels and brought them home from the White Sea port town of Archangel. In 1871, the blue coated cat first made its appearance in a cat show at the Crystal Palace in London.

The Russian Blue is a gentle cat with a somewhat shy nature around strangers. They are devoted to and affectionate with their loved ones. Sensitive to their owner’s moods, the Russian Blue will greet you at the door, find a quiet seat next to you, or fetch a toy at playtime. In fact, “fetching” is a favorite pastime for Russians and their owners! Pull out the vacuum cleaner, and the Russian will find a safer and quieter location. Relatively quiet-voiced (except perhaps at mealtime), the Russian Blue appreciates a pat on the head, a window from which to watch the birds, and, of course, the comforts of home. Minimal grooming is required; regular nail clipping, good nutrition, an occasional combing, and lots of petting keep your Russian Blue pet looking spectacular.
We receive requests every week from people who are looking for some place to take their “pet” cat.  Each year we have to turn away more than 100 such “pets“.  These unwitting owners have discovered that all exotic cats, both male and female, neutered or not, spray and bite when they reach sexual maturity.  (They don’t just spray a little either.  We are talking about buckets of the foulest smelling urine, all over your house, your things and you. If you don’t believe me, watch this clip of a neutered lion HERE)  Moving them out to the yard means your neighbors will soon be complaining that your place smells like a zoo.   By the time they find us they have discovered that the zoos do not want their animals, that no one is willing to buy them and that they can’t even give them away.  Refuges are usually full to capacity and cannot take in another hungry mouth to feed.  All too often, these “pets” are turned out to fend for themselves, where they surely die of starvation or are euthanized.
The AZA (American Zoological Association) zoos got together and took captive bred ocelots and released them in TX. The problem was that none of the cats in zoos had come from TX originally because the ocelots in TX had been extinct for a long time. Instead, they had all come from cats who were taken from the wilds of Central America long ago. In Central America ocelots eat snakes because most of them are non venomous. When the zoo bred ocelots were turned loose in TX they reverted to their ancient instincts in search of food and sought out snakes, but the TX snakes were mostly rattlesnakes and the ocelot program died out in a matter of weeks.
A supposed wildcat hybrid Bobcat (white) x domestic cat, with a further mating with a Highland Lynx to produce the curled ears. However, this is a selectively bred, totally domestic cat (no wild cat blood) that is meant to look like a bobcat. The Alpine lynx has longer hind legs and a large but not round head. The toes are tufted. They are intelligent cats.
Rapid breathing (tachypnea) is a respiratory disorder characterised by abnormal breathing that is rapid and shallow.  It is caused by a reduced level of oxygen, mechanical disorders (where the lungs aren’t able to expand as they should, usually due to a build-up of fluid in or around the lungs), and physiological disorders in which the cat’s respiratory centre in the brain is over stimulated.
×