Because they are easily startled, it’s best to keep equipment and devices that make loud noises, i.e., vacuum cleaners, blenders and such tucked away in a storage or a corner spot in the house. When this happens, scoop up your cat, place them in a quiet, safe spot and reassure him. Allocate a quiet space for your cat as sort of “sanctuary” so they can retreat as needed.
Lulu may be displaying perfectly normal behavior for an increase in temperature, or she may be having a problem. Without examining her, I have a hard time commenting on whether she is okay, but if she is acting normally otherwise, you may be fine to monitor her. If she continues to have rapid shallow breathing or seems to have problems catching her breath, it would be best to have her examined by a veterinarian.
A cat’s resting respiratory rate shouldn’t go over 30 or 35 breaths per minute, anything above this should be checked by your Veterinarian. As a Nurse you will know that the respiratory rate may change in response to pain, oxygenation of blood, cardiac output as well as other factors; there are no specific diagnoses which list rapid breathing as their only symptom as other symptoms may not be observable including anaemia, heart conditions (possibly a murmur) etc… Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

Hello. My cay spooky was hospitalized last night for suspected poisoning from bug spray. He was stabilized and spent the night with iv and vitamins, pain medication etc. Today at around 5 they released him to be watched at home and he seems much better although he seems to be having rapid breaths or a hard time breathing. I can hear it and he seems to be straining. Is this from all the medication or residual poison? will it pass?

Without examining Midnight it is difficult to give a diagnosis since lethargy and loss of appetite are vague symptoms common with many different conditions; infections, parasites (regardless of indoor or not), foreign objects, poisoning, spoiled food, injury (fell from somewhere) among many other causes may lead to these symptoms. You should ensure that Midnight is kept hydrated, but if there is no improvement you should visit your Veterinarian for an examination. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
Anticoagulants (blood thinners) and antiaggregants (antiplatelet) – These drugs reduce the occurrence of blood clots forming. Anticoagulants work by delaying the clotting of blood; common medications include Warfarin and Heparin. Antiaggregants stop platelets from clumping together to form a plug. Aspirin and clopidogrel are two drugs in this category.
Queening is a painful process just like childbirth is for humans and some heavy breathing or panting may occur afterwards for a few days due to discomfort. But if you feel that she is straining or in distress you should visit your Veterinarian to check her over to ensure that there isn’t a retained kitten or another issue leading to these symptoms. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
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