Thanks for your advice. I wanted to give recovery feedback. So the symptoms are still going on. I took her to the vet for a control and the vet told me she doesnt hear anything wrong with her breathing, and the palate healed already. The vet thinks the symptoms are from the hot weather. And the blinking ete just happens sometimes, nothing to worry about. I continue watching her, hoping everything will go back to normal.
But people jump the gun saying oh no its the exotic in them. Ive even heard of non-educated self claimed breeders that its just the exotic. NO it was the breeder not raising the cat right to begin with then blame the breed. MANY people do the right thing but they charge more than backyard mills, unfortunately people just see price which I understand to an extent.
The heavy breathing is likely due to the pain which Blaze is experiencing, without examining him I cannot give you any specific indication of what has occurred but would recommend that you visit your Veterinarian for an examination to determine whether it is due to a traumatic injury from playing or from another cause. Visit your Veterinarian before they close for the weekend. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
This cat breed has a very interesting history. Sometimes referred to as Archangel Blues, the cats are believed to have originated in the Archangel Isles, located in Northern Russia, and may have been pets of Russian czars long time past. They’re considered a natural breed and not sprung from interbreeding programmes. The thick, warm coat is due to the cat needing something to keep warm against the frozen tundras and the cold, harsh winters of the country.
Without examining Tilly I cannot say for certain whether I would recommend euthanasia or not; but if she is struggling to breathe, seems in pain and your Veterinarian hasn’t recommended any surgical options (due to age or location of tumour) then you may want to think about euthanasia. It is a very difficult decision to make, but you need to look at Tilly’s quality of life and what the future holds for her. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
My kitten has been in and out of the vet's office and is on strong antibiotics and oxygen since Oct. 26 until now and he is getting better for a few days and he is right back at it. He has spent a lot of time at the vet and the bill is getting high. He is home and I am giving him the antibiotics and oxygen at home and it does not seem to be helping here. But at the vet he does good after a day or two. How much oxygen do I give him at home and how often?
There is no approved adulticide (medications to kill adult heartworms) treatments for cats. Adulticides are themselves dangerous. A single dead worm can be fatal in cats as it can break away and cause a blockage of the pulmonary artery (pulmonary embolism). Heartworms in cats have a shorter lifespan than those in dogs; therefore it is preferable to manage symptoms and use a wait and see approach.

My cat just gave birth to 4 beautiful kittens but after her labor she started breathing rapidly. It has been 8 hours since, and she is still breathing rapidly and now she is also opening her mouth while sticking her tongue out. she already ate twice and drank lots of water but since her labor she hasn't done the restroom, I believe she is straining and now im very worried for her. what can be happening with her? what can I do?

Thank you for you email. unfortunately, without examining Kai, i can't comment on what might be going on with him. He needs to see his veterinarian to try and determine what is going on with him and how to treat him. If he seems to be in distress and unable to catch his breath, taking him to the emergency clinic tonight is most appropriate. I hope that he is okay.
A loss of appetite and lethargy are both vague symptoms but the rapid breathing is concerning, you should visit your Veterinarian for an examination as rapid breathing may be associated with pain, anaemia, heart disease among many other conditions. Without examining Ozzy I cannot determine the specific underlying cause of the symptoms and would recommend that a visit to your Veterinarian be made before the weekend. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
Cats can also develop fluid build up in the chest that is localized outside the lungs. This happens in an area named the pleural space. When fluid accumulates in the pleural space, the lungs cannot inflate as much as they should. Your cat will develop shortness of breath and labored breathing as more fluid fills this space. According to VCA Animal Hospitals, some causes of pleural effusion include:
Blood work will identify the presence of any infections and will involve a quick needle stick procedure, done in your veterinarian’s office. Depending on the results from a preliminary physical exam, review of symptoms, and blood work, your veterinarian may wish to order imaging of your cat’s chest area. Images such as x-rays or an ultrasound will help identify any fluid buildup, foreign objects, or potential tumors, masses or foreign objects that may be causing the heavy breathing. Depending on your cat, your vet may order a mild sedative be given to your cat to potential limit movement. Your cat remaining calm and still will have a large impact on the clarity of the images.
A supposed wildcat hybrid Bobcat (white) x domestic cat, with a further mating with a Highland Lynx to produce the curled ears. However, this is a selectively bred, totally domestic cat (no wild cat blood) that is meant to look like a bobcat. The Alpine lynx has longer hind legs and a large but not round head. The toes are tufted. They are intelligent cats.

Pulmonary edema is the buildup of fluid in the within these air sacs leading to shortness of breath. Located in the lungs are thousands of air sacs (alveoli) which are small balloon-like structures where the exchange of carbon dioxide and oxygen occurs. Tiny capillaries surround the alveoli on the outside. When the cat breathes in, air enters the lungs, causing the alveoli to expand. Oxygen passes from the alveoli and into the capillaries, carbon dioxide from the capillaries pass into the alveoli and is exhaled out. The most common causes of pulmonary edema relate to problems with the heart, such as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.  Heart diseases can lead to reduced movement of blood through the capillaries in the lungs. As the blood flow slows, fluid leaks out of the vessels into the airways. [1]
Generally a respiratory rate over 40 breaths per minute is considered worrying; however an increased respiratory rate is a symptom common with many different conditions including pain, heart disease, lung disorders, fluid in the chest or abdomen, poisoning among many other conditions. Monitor Ginger for the time being and visit your Veterinarian if there is no improvement or you’re generally concerned. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

My cat was seen by my vet 2 days ago for lethargy, loss of appetite and rapid breathing. The vet diagnosed a viral or bacterial infection and slight dehydration. She had a temp of 103.4. She was given I.V. fluid, a long acting antibiotic shot and a fever reducer. She's not much better. Should I give the medication more time to work or does she need to be seen again.
Please do not ask us to sell you a kitten, nor to refer you to a broker, dealer or breeder.  These animals do not make good pets and if you have the experience and expertise to care for one for the rest of it’s life, then you should be donating your time to caring for the hundreds of unwanted ones who have ended up in real sanctuaries.  Real sanctuaries do not breed.
I took my cat into the vet Monday and Tuesday. he was giving a shot to bring down his fever both times also antibiotics that he is still receiving morning and night.he was acting up not eating not drinking water and a fever. Wednesday and thursday he was just fine being normal but he still hasn't ate a lot. Thursday night his breathing started to become fast and short what could this be. Vet did not believe this was distemoer.
My wonderful kitty Dave is generally very healthy. He cuddles and plays all the time and is always by my side when I’m home. I’ve noticed this a few times but most recently a few days ago- he’ll be breathing very fast (60bpm) and shivering. He doesn’t try to hide and definitely wants to be held or cuddled but doesn’t want to move around. Last time it happened there was a bad thunderstorm and I wasn’t home for the worst part of it. Could he have just been scared? After a little while as the storm does down, he used his litter box and peed a lot, then pooped - also a lot. Buried it. Drank his water, ate some food and was back to purring and playing. I can’t remember if it had stormed the other times he’s acted like that with the rapid breathing and dilated glassy eyes, but i did notice that he’ll cuddle then use the box and feel better. He’s even cried before in his litter box, like it hurt to go poop. But I figured out that only happened when he ate fishy cat food so now he gets beef, chicken or turkey.
Pneumonia is an infectious/inflammatory disorder of the lung parenchyma. Tiny bronchi fill the lungs; each one ends in smaller sacs known as alveoli which contain tiny blood vessels. Oxygen is added to the blood and carbon dioxide removed via the alveoli. Pneumonia causes these alveoli to fill with pus and fluids which affect the lung’s ability to exchange gases. There are several causes including infection (viral, fungal, bacterial, parasitic), aspiration of gastric contents or medications.
Russian Blues are fiercely loyal and they bond strongly when given enough care and attention. It’s understandable that these cats may be wary of strangers and new guests and show aloofness, but it’s their nature. They are very sociable and are great companions for young children. Moreover, the Foreign Blue is very patient and tolerant towards the younger ones who should treat them with utmost kindness and respect. The cat can put up with a few clumsy pats on the head from infants, but too much of it and they’ll most likely slink away or climb up to a safer spot.
Give your Foreign Blue an adequate diet in the form of premium, dry cat food. You can spoil your cat from time to time and give him canned food that’s rich in protein. As they get older, dietary requirements may change, so it’s best to consult with a veterinarian for recommendations. When it’s time to change food, remember to add the new food gradually and mix it in the old one in the span of a few weeks or so. Make the transition too fast and your cat may get an upset tummy.
My kitten has been in and out of the vet's office and is on strong antibiotics and oxygen since Oct. 26 until now and he is getting better for a few days and he is right back at it. He has spent a lot of time at the vet and the bill is getting high. He is home and I am giving him the antibiotics and oxygen at home and it does not seem to be helping here. But at the vet he does good after a day or two. How much oxygen do I give him at home and how often?
I was under the impression that a Bobcat (meaning the wild kind) would be thinking dinner if he ran across a domestic cat. Bobcats are also so much bigger than a normal housecat. I can't imagine them breeding. Do they really breed in the "wild?" I got to see a bobcat closeup at a cat rescue (the owner used to do wildlife rescue and this guy couldn't go back to the wild) and I just can't imagine him wanting to breed with a domestic cat, as opposed to eating it.
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I took my senior cat Butters to the vets just a few weeks ago and the vet did just a physical exam. Said he was very healthy for a senior and looked great. Just two weeks before the appointment I had noticed he put on weight out of no where.. so since the visit I have noticed that he’s breathing very heavily and quickly and it shows in his abdominal. No panting though. I also noticed that he is purring more than usual. He was always did purr as he’s a loving and content boy, but I’ve noticed it even when I am not giving him affection and he is sitting next to me. Should I be worried at all?
Chester was taken in last night for an abscess removal surgery on his neck. I got him back this morning and he is having trouble using his litter box. are there any suggestions to help him use it? also, the vet prescribed 2 antibiotics but no pain reliever for chester. he has a drain in his face and i could only imagine how painful it will be for the next few days until he gets it removed. i was told that chester was given a pain medication shot. how long is this supposed to last? it doesn't seem humane to let him go back home without the necessary pain relief medication. In addition, his breathing is quite fast. is that normal for a post abscess removal surgery?
I was under the impression that a Bobcat (meaning the wild kind) would be thinking dinner if he ran across a domestic cat. Bobcats are also so much bigger than a normal housecat. I can't imagine them breeding. Do they really breed in the "wild?" I got to see a bobcat closeup at a cat rescue (the owner used to do wildlife rescue and this guy couldn't go back to the wild) and I just can't imagine him wanting to breed with a domestic cat, as opposed to eating it.
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Thanks for reaching out to us. 🙂 We are no vets, but it sounds like your kitty is doing a-okay! If everything else is normal (eating, potty, sleep, appetite, etc.) then there isn’t much cause to worry. A healthy cat will take anywhere between 20 or 30 breaths per minute. But if you begin to observe a loss of appetite, blue gums, panting with the tongue out, and so on, then those are indicators of something more serious. We hope this helps. Best of luck and thanks again!
My cat seems to be a really healthy cat. I recently brought him to the vet and he had a physical exam done. They didn't find any problems. However, I do notice that he has always been a fast breather. I have two cats, and one has always breathed faster than the other and meowed a lot more than the other. However, other than those two things he seems fine - eats well, very active, skin and fur look great, etc. Do I need to be worried enough to take him to get a blood test?
My cat, Arwen, just came out to the living room limping badly with her front right leg kinda knuckling over. The leg and paw is cool to the touch in comparison to the rest of her body and her shoulder blade is just flat. I pinched her toes a little and there was no reaction. She's also breathing kind of shallow and fast with it seems like she's breathing from her stomach not her chest. She is crying a little bit but not when we touch the leg, onky when she tries to move around while laying down.

In 1912 the Foreign Blue, one of the breed’s early names, warranted their own class and finally got separated from the blue cats variety. Progress of the cat’s popularity was halted, with the breed coming dangerously close to extinction during the onset of World War II. Breeders tried to revive the line by crossing the Russian Blue to Bluepoint Siamese and British Blues. Scandinavian breeders tried the same using Finland blue cats and Siamese blues.
When the Russian Blue cat sees his favorite family member, though, it’s a whole different matter. This cat will follow the individual around the whole house and can sometimes hitch a ride on that person’s shoulder. The Foreign Blue greets the owner at the door and is sensitive to your mood, i.e., with playtime or just by settling down next to you. Owners rarely hear the cat’s voice unless it’s mealtime. Some of the things an Archangel Blue appreciates are a hearty game of fetch, a window with a great outdoor view and pats on the head.
My cat has began to be really affectionate. than started meow more and more often, noticed blood and i called vets, they said i can wait till next day for appointment as it doesn't seem to be serious. Right now she is started rapidly breathe and walks back and forth from my room to next room and getting comfy in the sheets. i know it could be signs of pregnancy, and her nipples are slightly swollen. but i only just noticed today and all been developing within the past 5 hours.
Generally a respiratory rate over 40 breaths per minute is considered worrying; however an increased respiratory rate is a symptom common with many different conditions including pain, heart disease, lung disorders, fluid in the chest or abdomen, poisoning among many other conditions. Monitor Ginger for the time being and visit your Veterinarian if there is no improvement or you’re generally concerned. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
There are many different conditions which may be affecting Braxton which may include infections, parasites among other causes; if the breathing is affected you should visit a Veterinarian for a thorough examination to be on the safe side since I cannot advise any treatment without examining Braxton first especially due to her age. Continue with kitten milk replacer in the meantime. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

While oxygen is being transferred to the red blood cells, carbon dioxide is transferred from the red blood cells into the lungs. It is then carried out through the nose through a process referred to as expiration. This cyclic motion of breathing is controlled by the respiratory center in the brain and nerves in the chest. Diseases that affect the respiratory system, or the respiratory center in the brain, can bring about breathing difficulties. Troubled or labored breathing is medically referred to as dyspnea, and excessively rapid breathing is medically referred to as tachypnea (also, polypnea). 

I hope that you can help me At school my granddaughter is currently (she is 8) working on wild cats. I have volunteered to make her a book of photographs and information on cats through the alphabet. There are two that I have not been able to find (hours on Google) V & X I was wondering if someone can help on a name (or Latin) for an obscure feline or subspecies. I think I will have to give up on the X but I’ve bent the rules a bit and will use Xausted and shown a lion sleeping in… Read more »
Hypoglycemia is a life-threatening condition in which the blood sugar levels drop dangerously low. The pancreatic beta cells produce the hormone insulin which helps to move glucose from food into the cells (for energy).  It is not a disease in itself, but it is a symptom of an underlying disorder. Causes include excessive insulin administration in the diabetic cat, decreased glucose production (missed meal, vomiting, certain medications, glycogen storage disease), and excessive glucose consumption due to sepsis (bacterial infection of the blood).
All big cat species spawn on grass blocks at light levels of 9 or more with at least 2 block space above. Some species can only spawn in certain biomes; leopards and panthers spawn in jungles, forests and their variants; lions and tigers spawn in plains and forests; and snow leopards spawn in cold biomes. Lions and tigers also spawn more frequently than panthers. There is a 1/20 chance of a white lion, lioness or tiger spawning, and a lower chance for a white cub to spawn.
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The Russian Blue can spend hours amusing itself and does not mind an awful lot if it is left at home alone for the day, but it will be very happy to see you when you do arrive. This cat makes for an excellent companion, constantly following its owners about, and generally preferring one human above all others in the family. It should be added that the Russian Blue gets along with most everyone, including children. Their love of human company extends to impishly clowning to help calm a crying baby, and showing sympathy when their people get the blues by patting the face of the person.
Hi! My cat squeakers has always been breathing faster than normal. Our other cats only do it after playing and running around. She seems to have been breathing like this for her whole life. She doesn’t display any other concerning symptoms at all. She’s eating and drinking normally. She gets in exercise when she plays and she’s still her old self. I’m wondering if it would be best to take her to a vet? Or maybe is it just normal for her?

Little is known about the origin of the Russian Blue breed, though stories are legendary. Many believe the Russian Blue is a natural breed originating from the Archangel Isles in northern Russia, where the long winters developed a cat with a dense, plush coat. Rumors also abound that the Russian Blue breed descended from the cats kept by the Russian Czars. Assuming the Russian Blue did migrate from northern Russia, it was likely via ship to England and northern Europe in the mid 1860s.


There are other reasons, in the real world, why it doesn’t work, which includes the fact that human – big cat conflict is one of the main reasons cats are wiped out of areas. Captive breeding not only selectively chooses animals that are least fit for the wild but also conditions the cats to not fear humans. That increases the conflict and the result is that not only would the offending cat be killed, but likely any wild cat seen in the area would be hunted down and killed in a case of mistaken identity. That escalates the extinction of cats in the wild.
My cat has feline viral rhinotracheitis. The vet has given him steroid shots as a temporary fix but it doesn’t help much. Today I came in my house and found him breathing very hard and labored. His respiratory rate is 120, yes 120. His ears are very warm and his third eyelids are covering half of both eyes. He won’t eat. He will not respond to me when I talk to him. He has been on my sofa asleep all day.
As with all non-domestic hybrid source breeds, some Chausies may inherit intestinal tracts similar to that of the non-domestic ancestors. The intestinal tract may be a little shorter than that of the traditional domestic cat. A shorter intestinal tract is thought to be less capable of processing ingredients derived from plants. That would include any kind of cereal, as well as vegetables, herbs, and spices. Those ingredients may serve as triggers for chronic intestinal inflammation and eventually lead to chronic inflammatory bowel disease that is perpetuated by multiple allergies to proteins in commercial cat food.[9] Regardless of the cause, Chausies do seem somewhat prone to developing food allergies. To prevent this, breeders advise Chausie owners to feed only very high quality commercial cat foods, containing as little of plant-derived ingredients as possible or advise feeding homemade raw or cooked meat diets with appropriate supplementation. If homemade diets are fed, it should be with the guidance of someone experienced in preparing them, because meat by itself does not contain all the nutrients that Chausies require.
^ "Colorpoint Longhair" has multiple meanings and "Javanese" has been used for at least one other breed; the WCF uses the "Javanese" name for the Oriental Longhair (not colorpointed). The WCF has also merged the colorpointed Javanese/Colorpoint Longhair, the Himalayan and the Colourpoint Shorthair of other registries into a single breed, the Colourpoint. In the CFA, the TICA and some other registries, the Javanese/Colorpoint Longhair has merged back into the Balinese as a division
Adding to the captivating physical qualities of this breed is the eye color. The eyes are yellow while the Russian Blue is a kitten, and by four months there is a bright green ring around the pupil. As the cat matures, the eye color graduates into a bright, vivid green, aesthetically intensifying the already remarkable blue-silver coloring of the cat. The eyes are wide set and round, and only slightly slanted at the upper corners, giving the Russian Blue a sweet expression that matches well with its gentle temperament.
Without examining Narla I cannot say for certain what the underlying cause for the breathing difficulties are, however it is possible that this is a side effect of the flea and tick medication especially if given an incorrect dose or given a product intended for use in dogs. You should visit your Veterinarian since Narla is having respiratory issues as soon as possible. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
If you’re her favorite human, be ready for nonstop love, because she is all about you, you and more you. Feeling out of sorts? She’ll stick by your side, working her healing abilities on you until you’re up and at ’em again! Prepping dinner? She’ll chill by your side, acting as taste tester. Binge-watching a new TV show? She’ll curl up by your side — just have a comb handy, as she loves being brushed while watching the tube! 
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