My cat has feline viral rhinotracheitis. The vet has given him steroid shots as a temporary fix but it doesn’t help much. Today I came in my house and found him breathing very hard and labored. His respiratory rate is 120, yes 120. His ears are very warm and his third eyelids are covering half of both eyes. He won’t eat. He will not respond to me when I talk to him. He has been on my sofa asleep all day.


I cannot legally recommend the use of antibiotics in a cat I haven’t examined; also I don’t know the dosage of the penicillin, what the inert ingredients are in that batch, whether it is expired, has been stored correctly etc… You should try to clean Jazzy’s lip with a dilute antiseptic and ensure she remains hydrated, you should also visit an Emergency Veterinarian if one is open near to you for an examination and pain relief. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
Because breeders outcrossed the foundation jungle cats to mostly intelligent, outgoing breeds such as the Abyssinian and Oriental Shorthair, Chausies are intelligent, active, athletic cats. They are often very "busy" as kittens. As adults, they are quieter, but they still retain a playfulness and lifelong curiosity. Chausies do not like to be alone; they need to have other cats as companions or have human company most of the time. Chausies get along well with dogs, too, and will do fine if raised with a canine buddy. Additionally, Chausies form deep bonds with people. They are loyal, and may have difficulty adjusting if re-homed as adults.

Breathing rates may change for a variety of reasons and in some sleeping positions the airway may be slightly occluded which may result in altered breathing but without examining Kiki I cannot say for certain whether it is something to be concerned about or not. As for drinking, some cats may drink less that are on a wet food diet but you should ensure that she is keeping hydrated; you should visit your Veterinarian for a general check about the breathing and they can also check the hydration too. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
Feeding tamed big cats raw fish, raw porkchops, raw beef or raw rabbit together in an enclosed space will activate love mode. They can either be fed the meat, or it can be dropped next to them. After being fed and paired together, love hearts will show around the breeding pair, and after around 5–10 minutes, a cub will be produced and the naming screen will appear.
These intelligent animals will require substantial amounts of physical and mental activity. Keep toys lying around the house at all times. When they feel the need to “hunt”, a ball of string or a toy fish should capture their attention for hours. Keep in mind that these types of toys require human supervision as the contents could be chewed up, which can be harmful for your cat’s health.
Diagnosis of rapid breathing in your cat will require your veterinarian to determine the underlying cause. This will involve diagnostic tests that may not seem related to breathing, such as blood work, urinalysis and other extensive systemic exams. Given the lengthy list of potential conditions, it will be important for you to provide your veterinarian with a thorough physical and medical history of your cat. If your cat is allowed outdoors, has recently suffered from a traumatic injury, or could potentially have fallen from a high surface, this will be important information to help identify potential trauma or pain. You should also provide your vet with a history of progression of symptoms such as approximate time of onset and any worsening or improvement. This will help your veterinarian narrow down potential causes.
Russian Blues have a tolerant nature toward children who treat them kindly and respectfully. They will even put up with the clumsy pats given by toddlers, as if they recognize that no harm is meant, and if necessary they will walk away or climb out of reach to escape being bonked on the head. That said, the patient and gentle Russian Blue should always be protected from rough treatment, so always supervise very young children when they want to pet the cat. 

For as long as I can remember my 5 year old cat has intermittent rapid breathing. She doesn't seem bothered by this and she doesn't have any other symptoms when she is breathing quickly. I always forget to ask about this when she is at the vet and her breathing is always normal there. When her breathing is fast it's around 70 75 breaths per minute and normal is around 32. The intermittent fast breathing last maybe a few minutes and then goes back to normal.
Our senior cat began breathing heavily with fast respirations two days ago. Her appetite has gone down as well. I can get her to drink broth, and eat small amounts of tuna. About two months ago she began vomiting here and there after eating, but her appetite and energy were still good so I just assumed she might have eaten too quickly. She is still drinking, and hasn't vomited since the heavy,fast breathing and loss of appetite started three days ago, but she hasn't eaten much to throw up I guess. My concern is if this is just end of life I don't want to stress her out bringing her to the vet and getting unnecessary tests done. I feel like our vet's office has begun running tests more for the price tag they carry than whatever diagnosis they are hoping to find. I regret putting my senior dog through all the trips to the vet and tests they did before finally having him put down. If this is end of life I'd rather her go where she is comfortable at home than in the unfamiliar vet's office.
If Chester’s respiratory rate is over 100 breaths per minute you should visit your Veterinarian immediate for an examination since this is well over physiological range; infections, anaemia, allergies, congenital anomalies, foreign objects, fluid, parasites among other causes may be the underlying cause. I cannot give you any at home advice in a case this severe except to visit a Veterinarian for a thorough examination. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
All big cat species spawn on grass blocks at light levels of 9 or more with at least 2 block space above. Some species can only spawn in certain biomes; leopards and panthers spawn in jungles, forests and their variants; lions and tigers spawn in plains and forests; and snow leopards spawn in cold biomes. Lions and tigers also spawn more frequently than panthers. There is a 1/20 chance of a white lion, lioness or tiger spawning, and a lower chance for a white cub to spawn.
My cat is a 2 year old Male. He is breathing heavily and he doesn't have his mouth open. Everytime he moves he meows in pain, doesn't want me to touch him. He just keeps laying down and cant get comfortable. He was playing with his brother in the middle of the night. He came to bed was fine but I woke up this morning and he doesn't wanna be touched or covered up to stay warm. His ears are freezing cold.
Hello, I took my 9 month old Maine Coon to the vet 2 days ago to get a couple of mats shaved. I tried and was unsuccessful. It was a very stressful event for him, it took 3 people :( He started coughing and breathing very heavy last night. He is eating well but the quick breathing and coughing is continuing. Could this be related to stress? I am scared to stress him out more by taking him in.
Big Cat Rescue is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization, FEID 59-3330495. Florida law requires that all charities soliciting donations disclose their registration number and the percentage of your donation that goes to the cause and the amount that goes to the solicitor. We do not utilize professional solicitors, so 0% of your donation goes to a professional solicitor, 100% goes to Big Cat Rescue. Non-program expenses are funded from tour income, so 100% of your donations go to supporting the cats and stopping the abuse. A COPY OF THE OFFICIAL REGISTRATION AND FINANCIAL INFORMATION FOR BIG CAT RESCUE, A FL-BASED NONPROFIT CORPORATION (REGISTRATION NO. CH 11409), MAY BE OBTAINED FROM THE DIVISION OF CONSUMER SERVICES BY CALLING TOLL-FREE 1-800-435-7352 WITHIN THE STATE OR BY VISITING www.800helpfla.com. REGISTRATION DOES NOT IMPLY ENDORSEMENT, APPROVAL, OR RECOMMENDATION BY THE STATE.  

Thanks for your advice. I wanted to give recovery feedback. So the symptoms are still going on. I took her to the vet for a control and the vet told me she doesnt hear anything wrong with her breathing, and the palate healed already. The vet thinks the symptoms are from the hot weather. And the blinking ete just happens sometimes, nothing to worry about. I continue watching her, hoping everything will go back to normal.

Actually what you are seeing are the different color phases of a Bobcat. During the winter months, they are brown or brown grey. That is why Boris looks grey in the center picture, that was taken during the winter. All 3 are now orange or a brown/orange mix. Nakoma has the most orange on him as does Amber. Boris, since he is still a kitten, just a little over a year old, he still has a combination of orange and brown. Next summer he will be more orange.
Rapid breathing may be caused by a variety of different issues which may include traumatic injury and pain; however if there has been a puncture wound to the chest or neck which is compromising the respiratory tract, it should be treated as a medical emergency. You should keep Grace calm for now but visit a Veterinarian as soon as one is open if she’s having difficulty breathing. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
We took her to the vet and because of her age we declined to have any lab work performed. The vet said we can make her comfortable with some meds to increase her appetite. They worked at first, but now she will only eat treats daily. She is breathing very heavily. She seems to want attention and to be around us. Not sure what to do a this point. She does not seem to be in pain. We love her dearly but don want to keep her alive if she is suffering.
It is difficult to say what is causing the rapid breathing or the seizures a few weeks ago, a slightly elevated white blood cell count may indicate infection or inflammation but isn’t really diagnostic of anything specific (a differential count may help). Monitor Molly over the next few days especially when the antibiotics are finished to see if there are any other symptoms developing which may help narrow in on a cause. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
My 4 year old cat,yuri,had diaherria and vomited after she vomited she started to breathe rapidly and acted uneasey we thought maybe she has heatstroke so we cooled her off and after that we thought she was OK but we did not realize later that she was still breathing rapidly and acting lethargic the whole day ,she also hasn't eaten anything at since morning and has drank very little water ,I've been very worried and been thinking to take her to the vet tomorrow morning ,just hoping you guys would give us some advice for the night
My about 8 or 9 year old cat started breathing heavily today after me and friend did some major cleaning. She was diagnosed with feline leukemia when we took her to the vet for the first time after we got her when she was about 5 months to a year as a stray. It's never bothered her at all though, she's never had an issue. She's also never breathed like this before. So I didn't know if it was because all of the dust. The dust was so bad that we had masks while we cleaned. We just thought it was the dust in the air and I've opened up all the windows to air everything out. It was also 70 something degrees outside today and she does go in and out of the house.Other than her breathing she is eating, drinking and acting completely normal. So I was just going to take her to the vet if she was still breathing like this tomorrow, but the more I search online the more nervous I get that it's not just the dust and she may have a serious issue going on.
My cat, Arwen, just came out to the living room limping badly with her front right leg kinda knuckling over. The leg and paw is cool to the touch in comparison to the rest of her body and her shoulder blade is just flat. I pinched her toes a little and there was no reaction. She's also breathing kind of shallow and fast with it seems like she's breathing from her stomach not her chest. She is crying a little bit but not when we touch the leg, onky when she tries to move around while laying down.
Below are some zoos and pseudo sanctuaries in Florida.  These places breed and sell while lying to the public and saying they are doing it for conservation.  The file is large, so you may have to wait a bit for it to load fully and then hit play again. These are the ones that are open to the public. Many are much worse, but do not allow the public in to film.
Unlike horses, the breeding pair does not need to be kept away from other big cats, but they do need to be kept close in order to breed, therefore it is recommended to place them in a fenced area. Winged big cats, ghosts and hybrids are sterile and thus cannot breed. White lions and lionesses and white tigers cannot breed with other big cat species.
My cat seems to have rapid breathing, I can see her stomach area rising and falling as she sleeps. I tried to take her breathing rate and got 60-65 per minute. She is grooming herself more than usual. She has always been skittish, her eating is normal, and she has had normal bladder and bowel functions. I have a hard time getting her into a carrier so I do not take her to the vet often. I am in an area that is getting prepared for a powerful nor'easter, so I can't get her to a vet for a few days. Should I be worried? What can I do?
A loss of appetite and lethargy are both vague symptoms but the rapid breathing is concerning, you should visit your Veterinarian for an examination as rapid breathing may be associated with pain, anaemia, heart disease among many other conditions. Without examining Ozzy I cannot determine the specific underlying cause of the symptoms and would recommend that a visit to your Veterinarian be made before the weekend. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
Chausies are bred to be medium to large in size, as compared to traditional domestic breeds.[5] Most Chausies are a little smaller than a male Maine Coon, for example, but larger than a Siamese. Adult Chausie males typically weigh 15 to 25 pounds.[6][7] Adult females are usually 15 to 20 pounds.[6] However, because Chausies are built for running and jumping, they are long-bodied and leggy with medium boning.[1] The torso is deep-chested with flat sides. The ears are broad, tall, and set high on the head, about two fingers apart. The cheekbones are striking—prominent, long, and angular—and the eyes are flattened on top and form a half oval below.

I got a small Siamese cat(with rhinotracheitis), He started to breathe a bit fast (45/50 breath per minutes) and his heart is at 60 bpm. We just moved into a new place, he started breathing fast a week ago when we were buried in boxes. I thought it was stress, but it didn't stop. He still eat and moves everywhere, his attitude didn't change. We were at the vet maybe 3 months ago for pancreatitis and because he started losing balance (Ataxia/Unbalanced Gait) but we never wanted to check it, because of our money issue. We want to bring him to the vet, but what can we expect the result to be with these information?
Hypoglycemia is a life-threatening condition in which the blood sugar levels drop dangerously low. The pancreatic beta cells produce the hormone insulin which helps to move glucose from food into the cells (for energy).  It is not a disease in itself, but it is a symptom of an underlying disorder. Causes include excessive insulin administration in the diabetic cat, decreased glucose production (missed meal, vomiting, certain medications, glycogen storage disease), and excessive glucose consumption due to sepsis (bacterial infection of the blood).
Little is known about the origin of the Russian Blue breed, though stories are legendary. Many believe the Russian Blue is a natural breed originating from the Archangel Isles in northern Russia, where the long winters developed a cat with a dense, plush coat. Rumors also abound that the Russian Blue breed descended from the cats kept by the Russian Czars. Assuming the Russian Blue did migrate from northern Russia, it was likely via ship to England and northern Europe in the mid 1860s.
While oxygen is being transferred to the red blood cells, carbon dioxide is transferred from the red blood cells into the lungs. It is then carried out through the nose through a process referred to as expiration. This cyclic motion of breathing is controlled by the respiratory center in the brain and nerves in the chest. Diseases that affect the respiratory system, or the respiratory center in the brain, can bring about breathing difficulties. Troubled or labored breathing is medically referred to as dyspnea, and excessively rapid breathing is medically referred to as tachypnea (also, polypnea).

Thank you for your email. I'm glad that you have a scheduled appointment with Paige, as if the medications did not work, it deserves a second look. One thing that your veterinarian can do is to take an x-ray of her lungs and make sure that there is nothing to worry about there. If she isn't on heartworm prevention, a heartworm test might be a good idea as well. Without knowing the details of her situation, or being able to examine her, I can't comment more on what might be happening with her. I hope that she recovers well! 

Hybrids have always been popular. They make people feel connected with the wilderness outside. We can’t all own lions and tigers (nor should we), but so many people want little felines that resemble their larger, exotic cousins. Some breeders have begun breeding smaller wild species with domestic cats to create beautiful hybrids that are safe for the average cat owner to live with. Although hybrids are still controversial, there is no denying how unique and beautiful they are. Take a look at the most popular hybrids below.
Two days is still early days for treatment but you should start seeing some improvement in the next day or so, I would say to give it the weekend and if there is no improvement in Jinx’s condition you should return to your Veterinarian on Monday for another examination. Improvement in an animal's condition, especially with antibiotics, can be delayed in most cases so unless your Veterinarian said specifically ‘you’ll see improvement over the next 24 hours’ or something similar you should give it three or four days at least. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
While asthma would be helped by albuterol if this were related to heart disease then albuterol can be contraindicated, as it may raise an already fast heart rate making her heart function even more inefficient. I understand that you were trying to do anything to help but I don't recommend starting therapy without a better idea of what her primary problem is.
There are a few possible causes of rapid breathing or increased respiration rate in cats which may be due to allergies, infection, foreign objects, sign of pain, other pulmonary problems among other issues. It is important that any serious causes or ruled out or treated, it would be best to have your Veterinarian give Darcy a check up to be on the safe side on your next visit as 80 breaths per minute is around double the physiological range. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM www.vet.cornell.edu/fhc/Health_Information/dyspnea.cfm
Thank you for your email. Without examining Missy, I can't comment on what might be going on. She may just be a skittish cat, given all of the change that has gone on in her life recently. IF she is eating and drinking normally, and seems healthy otherwise, she may be okay. If she seems to be having breathing problems. it would be best to have her seen by your veterinarian, and they will be able to determine if she is normal, or has a problem. It is nice of you to help this cat when she needs it. I hope that she is okay.

Without examining Tilly I cannot say for certain whether I would recommend euthanasia or not; but if she is struggling to breathe, seems in pain and your Veterinarian hasn’t recommended any surgical options (due to age or location of tumour) then you may want to think about euthanasia. It is a very difficult decision to make, but you need to look at Tilly’s quality of life and what the future holds for her. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
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