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The Russian Blue can spend hours amusing itself and does not mind an awful lot if it is left at home alone for the day, but it will be very happy to see you when you do arrive. This cat makes for an excellent companion, constantly following its owners about, and generally preferring one human above all others in the family. It should be added that the Russian Blue gets along with most everyone, including children. Their love of human company extends to impishly clowning to help calm a crying baby, and showing sympathy when their people get the blues by patting the face of the person.
Pulmonary edema is the buildup of fluid in the within these air sacs leading to shortness of breath. Located in the lungs are thousands of air sacs (alveoli) which are small balloon-like structures where the exchange of carbon dioxide and oxygen occurs. Tiny capillaries surround the alveoli on the outside. When the cat breathes in, air enters the lungs, causing the alveoli to expand. Oxygen passes from the alveoli and into the capillaries, carbon dioxide from the capillaries pass into the alveoli and is exhaled out. The most common causes of pulmonary edema relate to problems with the heart, such as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.  Heart diseases can lead to reduced movement of blood through the capillaries in the lungs. As the blood flow slows, fluid leaks out of the vessels into the airways. [1]
Resting respiratory rate in a cat is around 15-40 breaths per minute, if Alaska is breathing more than that then it may be indicative of some underlying medical issue; without examining Alaska it is difficult for me to say specifically the cause or any treatment. An increase in respiratory effort may be attributable to pain, fluid in the lungs, narrowed airways among other issues; if you have recently changed food you should try changing back again but I would recommend having your Veterinarian check Alaska over to be on the safe side. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
Without examining Squish I cannot say whether there is a cause for concern or not, but generally if she is otherwise healthy and active when awake and isn’t showing any signs of exercise intolerance I would keep an eye on her. It may be that her sleeping position or a partial obstruction of the airway whilst resting may be causing an increase in respiratory effort; you should record her sleeping and visit your Veterinarian for an examination to be on the safe side for a little examination. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

Polydactyl cats, also called "polydacts" or "Hemingway cats" are sometimes confused as a "breed," however they fall under the domestic cat category. Truthfully, most registries do not accept polydact cats in their standards. Polydactyl means "many toes," and is considered a genetic defect. Ernest Hemingway had a number of polydactyl cats at his estate, and he allowed them to breed indiscriminately, so, many years after his death, the descendants of his original cats still live there. Polydacts may come in any variety of colors and color patterns.
My cat seems to have rapid breathing, I can see her stomach area rising and falling as she sleeps. I tried to take her breathing rate and got 60-65 per minute. She is grooming herself more than usual. She has always been skittish, her eating is normal, and she has had normal bladder and bowel functions. I have a hard time getting her into a carrier so I do not take her to the vet often. I am in an area that is getting prepared for a powerful nor'easter, so I can't get her to a vet for a few days. Should I be worried? What can I do?

My 1-year old cat, Chip, seems to be in a relatively constant state of tachypnea. He’s had a history of rapid/intermittently shallow breathing since I adopted him at 3 months old. He otherwise acts normal, with no periods of lethargy/concerning weight fluctuation/appetite or thirst fluctuation/GI upset. His mucous membrane color is always good and pink, and his physical exams have always showed NSF, so no palpable thoracic masses or anything like that. Should I be concerned about an internal mass, heartworms, or anything like that? Thanks so much for your time.


The Chausie was developed from hybrids of the Jungle Cat (Felis chaus), the largest species of the genus Felis, found in Asia. They can grow up to three feet long and weigh 35 pounds, but are generally around 18 pounds. Like the hybrids that developed into the Savannah and Bengal breeds, the males of the first few generations are usually infertile, and the F4 and F5 are considered truly domestic and suitable for cat shows. TICA classifies the Chausie as a championship breed.

Characteristics: You will first be struck by the beautiful silvery-blue coat of the Russian Blue. Their coat gives them an elegant appearance that is distinctly their own. The Russian Blue is a medium size cat that is muscular, with long legs and a long body. They are fine boned but often appear larger because of their thick double coat. They have large ears that are set far apart and are somewhat pointed. They have a medium, wedge-shaped head and, in addition to their uniquely beautiful coat, they have striking green eyes. They are wide-set and their vivid green color stands out because of the surrounding blue coat. They are truly a lovely and very beautiful cat.
Finally, when breeders began to combine several of these bloodlines, the Russian Blue strengthened in its class. From 1965-1970, the number of registered Russian Blue’s increased exponentially. The "father" of the modern standard Russian Blue was GC Felinest Flying High of Velva. Flying High performed admirably at shows as a kitten, and through his bloodline 21 kittens were produced, with six of them going on to become Grand Champions, two given Distinguished Merit, and one a National Winner -- GC, NW Velva's Blue Viking, which won 7th Best Cat in 1971, and 2nd Best Cat in 1972.
Solid black Chausies may have faint tabby markings (called ghost markings) as kittens, but usually acquire a dense, even black pigmentation with maturity.[8] Sometimes black grizzled tabby Chausies will appear indistinguishable from solid black Chausies when the amount of grizzling is minimal. Exposure to strong sunlight, as with most black cats, can cause black Chausies to lighten slightly and appear brownish.
Long term prognosis for recovery of your cat will vary from cause to cause. Infections and pneumonia are serious illnesses that need a high degree of specialized veterinary care. In all cases, your cat’s chances for a full recovery will increase if immediate veterinarian care is sought as soon as initial symptoms are detected. Additionally, given the seriousness of lung and breathing issues, you should follow up after symptoms in your cat have resolved in order to prevent potential recurrence.
Care: Russian Blue cats are fairly easy to care for. Their coats simply need to be brushed once a week so that they stay can show off their beautiful blue color. They may require more brushing when they are going through a season of shedding. Trim their nails and clean their ears as needed to keep them looking lovely. And, as with any cat, it is important to regularly brush their teeth to prevent periodontal disease. If you are looking for a hypoallergenic cat then the Russian Blue cat is a great candidate. They produce less of the Fel D1 protein which is the true cause for your allergic reaction. There is no cat that is 100% allergy free so increasing the frequency of grooming and bathing your furry friend will also help.
It is difficult to say what is causing the rapid breathing or the seizures a few weeks ago, a slightly elevated white blood cell count may indicate infection or inflammation but isn’t really diagnostic of anything specific (a differential count may help). Monitor Molly over the next few days especially when the antibiotics are finished to see if there are any other symptoms developing which may help narrow in on a cause. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
If Chester’s respiratory rate is over 100 breaths per minute you should visit your Veterinarian immediate for an examination since this is well over physiological range; infections, anaemia, allergies, congenital anomalies, foreign objects, fluid, parasites among other causes may be the underlying cause. I cannot give you any at home advice in a case this severe except to visit a Veterinarian for a thorough examination. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
This is a well-behaved cat that is easy to train. Or, rather, it easily trains its people. It enjoys a good game of fetch and will keep the game going longer than you may have time for, and you will make time because the Russian Blue is known for actually appearing hurt when it has been ignored. Elegant, and reserved, this cat is also very playful, and loves to chase after toys or sunbeams.
There are a few possible causes of rapid breathing or increased respiration rate in cats which may be due to allergies, infection, foreign objects, sign of pain, other pulmonary problems among other issues. It is important that any serious causes or ruled out or treated, it would be best to have your Veterinarian give Darcy a check up to be on the safe side on your next visit as 80 breaths per minute is around double the physiological range. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM www.vet.cornell.edu/fhc/Health_Information/dyspnea.cfm
So beloved was this breed to the Egyptians, that they are evident in their ancient artwork — and it’s easy to see why. Their mascara-like markings, stunning green eyes, and elegance are all noted by TICA. The shy, loyal breed with keen senses tends to have a “naturally worried” look, which is perhaps a nod to their aversion to loud noises. Hillspet.com says they enjoy a perch — like a bookshelf or fridge — from which to survey their domain, which most certainly belongs to them.
My fiance said the he saw her eat this afternoon, so that is a relief. Her gums are pink (that's one of the first things I looked at on her and I should've told you that...but... this is my BABY CAT and she has me a little panicked!.. not like dealing with humans on the ambulance... she's innocent!) I do have access to oxygen... so we can make her an oxygen tent if it's necessary. Right now, she is getting up every couple of minutes and repositioning or pacing.. her respiration rate is around 50 right now... her belly almost looks like it's spasming and her heart rate is running between 80 and 90 everytime we take it... which is low... what do you suggest??????
Thank you for your email. Since Tortie was just seen by your veterinarian and was deemed healthy, her periodic bouts of rapid breathing may be normal, and may follow bouts of exertion or anxiety. If the periods that she is breathing rapidly become more frequent, or more severe, it would be a good idea to have her seen by your veterinarian and examined to make sure that she is okay. It might be helpful to video the episode, since she doesn't seem to breathe that way when she is at an appointment. I hope that she is okay!

This is the most frequent email we get from exotic cat owners: “Hey, I’m really in over my head here!  I got this thing as an infant. I bottle-raised it. Everything was great. But I can no longer handle this cat. I cannot housebreak it. It tries to attack people. I just don’t know what to do with it.'” This was an actual quote about a Serval, but we have had hundreds of similar letters about every kind of exotic cat.

Without examining Kujo it is difficult to say specifically what the cause for panting is; sometimes there may be side effects from vaccines and other treatments but are self limiting and resolve themselves pretty quickly without veterinary intervention. However, if Kujo is struggling to breathe or there is no improvement you should return to your Veterinarian to be on the safe side. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
Sharleen ear temperature change hot to cold 4 times overnight. Sound stuffy when purr. Breath heavily and urinate lots and often last few weeks. Took her to the vet for blood work and check up today. She seem worse and in pain. Lower lip is now swollen, right front leg a little limping. Not active all afternoon. Night fall and she seem restless. What can I do to ease her pain while waiting for blood work result?
There are various causes for rapid breathing with pain being a common cause; infections, foreign bodies, heart conditions, allergies among other conditions may also cause rapid breathing. It may be worth trying to get Possum into the bathroom whilst you take a shower to see if the warm humid air helps to open her airway; otherwise we are a little bit stuck for a cause. If the cause was due to a blocked nose, your Veterinarian would have detected that on the physical examination. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
My kitten Rupert is only 7 weeks old and he started breathing rapidly the night before. At times he groans and breathes with his mouth open. He feels and sounds most uncomfortable when he is being held, but still has discomfort if laying down for a long time. I'm not sure if he has a cold, or if its something wrong with his lungs? He had just been in the emergency just 2 days ago for low blood sugar, but he wasn't doing this at that time. What do I do?
The Russian Blue is not believed to be related to the other three shorthaired solid blue breeds: Thailand’s Korat, France’s Chartreux, and Britain’s British Blue (now called the British Shorthair). The four breeds have distinct differences in coat type, conformation, and personality, although the Korat, Chartreux, and Russian Blue share a similar silver-blue sheen. Since all four of these breeds have been around for so long that their ancestries are shrouded in legend and conjecture, a common ancestor is possible.
After I had a party at my house a few days ago, my cat has been acting very differently. He sleeps all day and only gets up to pee or poop, doesn't eat and drink as much as he used to, and starts breathing more rapidly and heavily. I've brought him to a vet and they said that it's likely due to stress caused by the party, and for the past couple of days I've been giving him liquid food and vitamins with a pipette, but I feel like his breathing has actually gone worse. I'm just afraid that the vet misdiagnosed him (since I live in a rural town in Indonesia, I don't really trust the vet here), so do you think there's something more going on than just stress? Oh and if it helps, my cat had just done his first vaccination about a week ago. Thank you
Sorry to hear your kitty is scratching like that! Does he show any signs of skin infections, fleas, mites, wounds from other cats? The cone could have stressed him further, yes, if he was scratching already because of tension/anxiety. Open sores can get infected, especially when left untreated and scratched further. We would recommend taking your kitty to the vet for a diagnosis. They will be able to provide you the advice and medication your kitty might need. Best wishes!
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