The Ocicat was named for its resemblance to an ocelot, but it has no actual ocelot, or any wild cat, in its family tree—at least since the breed was developed in 1964. Only its appearance earned it a spot on this list. Virginia Daly, a longtime Michigan cat breeder, was trying to get a Siamese cat with Abyssinian points. She bred together cats with Abyssinian, Siamese, and American shorthair lineages. A kitten named Tonga resulted, which had ivory-colored fur with golden spots. Tonga was not used for breeding, but the same parents later produced kittens with the same markings. Ocicats come in a variety of colors, but are known for their spots. The breed standards say an Ocicat should be heavier than it appears and be well-muscled. Ocicats are sociable and their behavior may remind you of a dog—such as the way many like to play fetch. The Ocicat is recognized by TICA as a championship breed. 
My cat has always been healthy for 18 years human age until just last week of April my daughter told me that she is blind banging walls, and when I look closely her breathing was soooo rapid and that’s why I took her to the vet the following day (Thursday) and the vet took an x-ray found out that Shellas lungs was covered with fluids, he did not take a blood test that day coz of her conditions, he gave me pills but so far shellas conditions is not getting any better... what should I do????
Thank you for your question, and I am sorry about Billi. Unfortunately, without seeing the x-ray, knowing where or how large the tumor is, I can't comment on possible solutions. Lung masses are difficult to treat and tend not to respond well to therapy, but it really does depend on the type of mass, and he is quite young to have lung cancer. Sometimes we are able to to a tracheal wash to try and identify the type of cells, but I'm not sure if that is an option for Billi. Any possible treatments would be a good conversation with your veterinarian, who has seen Billi, and his x-rays, and knows more about his situation. I hope that he does well.

Los Angeles cat breeder Judy Sugden has been working since the late eighties to breed a house cat that resembles a tiger. The result is the Toyger, a registered breed that has a lineage beginning with domestic shorthairs and Bengals selected for their markings. Toygers are now available from breeders all over the world. The breed is still in development, and TICA now has the toyger classified as a championship breed. 
It’s a good idea to keep a Russian Blue as an indoor-only cat to protect him from diseases spread by other cats, attacks by dogs or coyotes, and the other dangers that face cats who go outdoors, such as being hit by a car. Russian Blues who go outdoors also run the risk of being stolen by someone who would like to have such a beautiful cat without paying for it.
Care: Russian Blue cats are fairly easy to care for. Their coats simply need to be brushed once a week so that they stay can show off their beautiful blue color. They may require more brushing when they are going through a season of shedding. Trim their nails and clean their ears as needed to keep them looking lovely. And, as with any cat, it is important to regularly brush their teeth to prevent periodontal disease. If you are looking for a hypoallergenic cat then the Russian Blue cat is a great candidate. They produce less of the Fel D1 protein which is the true cause for your allergic reaction. There is no cat that is 100% allergy free so increasing the frequency of grooming and bathing your furry friend will also help.
There are a few possible conditions which may affect a new mother a few weeks after queening which may include eclampsia, infections among other conditions which may lead to difficulty in walking and breathing. Since Noor is still nursing her kittens, you should take her to your Veterinarian for an examination (good to take the kittens too as separation may stress her) and see what they find with an examination and blood test. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
You should keep an eye on the kitten for now and ensure that he remains hydrated; rapid breathing may be attributable to numerous causes but shouldn’t be an issue unless he is in distress. See how he is over the next day or two, but if you don’t see any improvement you should visit your Veterinarian for another examination. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
You shouldn’t notice breathing rates over 40 breaths per minute in a resting cat; an increase in respiration may be due to inadequate airflow, malpositioning of the throat, respiratory infection, heart issues among other causes. Without examining Roxanne I cannot say for sure what is happening, keep a close eye on her and if you decide to have her fixed speak with your Veterinarian then. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
An increase in respiratory rate may be an indicator of pain especially if she is limping; without examining Isabella I cannot say whether this is due to pain or another cause (infection, heart disease etc…). I would restrict Isabella’s movements and monitor her for the time being but if it continues or the respiratory rate is above 40 breaths per minute you should visit your Veterinarian for an examination. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
Anemia is a condition characterised by a reduced number of red blood (also known as erythrocytes) cells in the blood. Is not a disease in itself but a symptom of an underlying condition. It can be due to the premature destruction of the red blood cells, decreased production (due to cancers, kidney disease, certain infections or drugs), blood loss, tumours, blood clotting disorders and parasites such as fleas and hookworm.
I was under the impression that a Bobcat (meaning the wild kind) would be thinking dinner if he ran across a domestic cat. Bobcats are also so much bigger than a normal housecat. I can't imagine them breeding. Do they really breed in the "wild?" I got to see a bobcat closeup at a cat rescue (the owner used to do wildlife rescue and this guy couldn't go back to the wild) and I just can't imagine him wanting to breed with a domestic cat, as opposed to eating it.
Panthers are small big cats with orange or yellowish eyes, and are covered in a black coat. They are not actually a different species, but are in fact black variants of leopards (much like real life panthers). An essence of darkness can be used on a panther to create a winged panther. Winged panthers share the same wing textures as black manticores and bat horses.
The Chausie was developed from hybrids of the Jungle Cat (Felis chaus), the largest species of the genus Felis, found in Asia. They can grow up to three feet long and weigh 35 pounds, but are generally around 18 pounds. Like the hybrids that developed into the Savannah and Bengal breeds, the males of the first few generations are usually infertile, and the F4 and F5 are considered truly domestic and suitable for cat shows. TICA classifies the Chausie as a championship breed.
One important note to keep in mind with this breed is its love of food. It will eat beyond its need and ask for seconds, making it a sure candidate for weight related conditions if it is allowed to eat as much as it wants. The best prevention is measuring the food and giving it only at assigned times of the day, and making sure that everyone in the house knows that they cannot give the cat too many treats or scraps.
A cat shouldn’t be breathing more than around 40 breaths per minute when at rest, if her breathing is above this rate then it may be indicative of something going on. An increase in breathing may be due to infections, heart disease, cancer, pleural effusion, allergies among other causes; given Smudge’s age, I would have your Veterinarian take a look at her to be on the safe side. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
I took my senior cat Butters to the vets just a few weeks ago and the vet did just a physical exam. Said he was very healthy for a senior and looked great. Just two weeks before the appointment I had noticed he put on weight out of no where.. so since the visit I have noticed that he’s breathing very heavily and quickly and it shows in his abdominal. No panting though. I also noticed that he is purring more than usual. He was always did purr as he’s a loving and content boy, but I’ve noticed it even when I am not giving him affection and he is sitting next to me. Should I be worried at all?
My cat was originally a stray and when I found her she was in perfect healthy. We regularly took her to her check ups. She is tiny but she appears to be an American shorthair. But, as of recently she started breathing weirdly. She would lay on her stomach and this rattle sound would emit from her body. Her breathes would change from shallow and rapid to deep and slow. Before this happened, she had a slight cough with the same rattle noise. Like a human with an infection in their lungs. When we took her to the vet they would tell us she was fine. She was active and still regularly eating. We've taken her to multiple veterinary clinics and they've all told us they aren't sure what she has. They've done multiple Xrays and still cant seem to narrow the problem. We've put her on several antibiotics prescribed by the vet but nothing seems to make a dent. They offered the idea of asthma. We gave her treatment but still nothing. They told us it seemed that she had air pockets and some fluid. We ended up paying a ridiculous amount for treatment of a washout and still nothing. She eats regularly but her breathing is still the same. There was this one time she sneezed and big amount of mucus discharge came from her nose. No matter who we go to they all tell us we need to prescribe more expensive treatment just so they can say they don't know in the end. Can you help us?
Tilson says tigers are the most charismatic animal on earth. Their appeal is universal. “They are the alpha predator who used to kill and eat us,” he says. “We cannot help but be in awe of their power and grace. Tigers represent everything fine and decent and powerful. Everything those people would like to be. It’s all an ego trip—big guns, big trucks, and big tigers.”
My cat Nala is just over a year old, two nights ago she expierienced some rapid breathing. It sounded as though she had a stuffy nose. She sounded very congested. She wasn’t panting with her mouth open but nether the less I began to worry and called an emergency 24hr Vetenarian. They told me to bring her in, so upon arriving and waiting to see a vet finally we were told that she “seemed bright and happy, her lungs sounded clear but she did have a little bit of referred upper respiratory noise”.
Stress may be a contributing factor for why Leo is breathing rapidly and sleeping, also a new environment may have other allergens or contaminants like cigarette smoke or different cleaning products which may cause some respiratory irritation. You should keep an eye on Leo for the meantime and if the problem continues you should visit your Veterinarian when you get back. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
I'm afraid that I can't offer much more assistance for Bella than what you have already done, without being able to see or examine her. If she has not had a trans-tracheal wash, that may be one test that can help determine the type of cells that are present in her lungs, and if the x-rays have not been evaluated by a specialist, that is another possibility, as your veterinarian should be able to send those x-rays to be evaluated further.

I have a 7 yr old Scottish Fold. I took her to the vet on Friday because I noticed her breathing rapidly. The vet said there were no signs of a respiratory infection (lungs sounded clear, eyes & ears appeared fine) but gave her a shot of antibiotics and some pain med. (in case she was panting due to being in pain)and sent us home. Its now 2 days later and shes still having a hard time breathing. Could she possibly jst have a stuffy nose from allergies and thats causing her to struggle. I mentioned it to the vet, but he said no because her nose doesnt have any discharge.
11 month old kitten with rapid breathing since we got him at 3 months old. Acting normal, voiding without issue, playing, eating and drinking. Normal behaviors. As a nurse myself I always questioned his fast breathing but because he is a kitten I let it slide thinking that maybe they, like babies/children have faster respiratory rates. He is half tabby half Maine coon and is about 12-13lbs. His respiratory rate at rest is about 75-85. He has only panted about 3 times that we’ve seen during intense play time with our other cat. No coughing or runny nose. I’m very worried now that he is approaching a year old. I’ve been through the ringer with expensive tests at the vet with another cat and I’m wondering what are the baseline tests for this that I can start with that could lead to answers? And what are the most common diagnosises with rapid breathing being the only symptom? Thoughts and many thanks in advance!
Okay so we’ve had our cat since being a kitten and she’s always been very scatty as we think she was abused, due to getting her and her having marks on her neck, but her breathing has always been rapid. (80 resps per minute) but in herself, she’s like any normal cat. She’s very friendly, not in any form of pain, is this something that needs to be addressed?
Because breeders outcrossed the foundation jungle cats to mostly intelligent, outgoing breeds such as the Abyssinian and Oriental Shorthair, Chausies are intelligent, active, athletic cats. They are often very "busy" as kittens. As adults, they are quieter, but they still retain a playfulness and lifelong curiosity. Chausies do not like to be alone; they need to have other cats as companions or have human company most of the time. Chausies get along well with dogs, too, and will do fine if raised with a canine buddy. Additionally, Chausies form deep bonds with people. They are loyal, and may have difficulty adjusting if re-homed as adults.
Russian Blues are known to be quiet, gentle, genteel cats, and are usually reserved or absent when strangers come to call. When they’re with their own beloved and trusted humans, however, they are playful and affectionate. Russian Blues are active but not overly so. They like nothing better than to spend time pouncing on a favorite toy or chasing sunbeams. They willingly entertain themselves, but prefer games in which their preferred people take an active role. When you’re home, they follow you around, unobtrusive but ever-present companions.
Hi. My cat has been lethargic for 4 days and spends lots of time under the bed. An inconclusive chest xray looked spotty and web-like in her lungs. My vet suggested valley fever tests but also said it could be cancer. She walks uneasy, but still attempts to eat and makes it to the litter box. She appears very restless and uncomfortable. I am giving her subQ fluids, an anti-fungal and pain meds to get her through the rough patch.
There are many different causes for rapid breathing in cats which may include pain, respiratory infection, heart failure among other causes. Without an examination and thorough auscultation of the chest, I cannot say what the cause is or the best course of treatment; anytime resting respiratory rate is over 40 breaths per minute, you should visit your Veterinarian as soon as possible. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
Inconsistency in breed classification and naming among registries means that an individual animal may be considered different breeds by different registries (though not necessarily eligible for registry in them all, depending on its exact ancestry). For example, the TICA's Himalayan is considered a colorpoint variety of the Persian by the CFA, while the Javanese (or Colorpoint Longhair) is a color variation of the Balinese in the TICA and the CFA; both breeds are merged (along with the Colorpoint Shorthair) into a single "mega-breed", the Colourpoint, in the World Cat Federation (WCF), who have repurposed the name "Javanese" for the Oriental Longhair. Also, "Colo[u]rpoint Longhair" refers to multiple different breeds in some other registries. There are several examples of nomenclatural confusion of this sort. Furthermore, many geographical and cultural names for cat breeds are fanciful selections made by Western breeders to be "exotic"-sounding and bear no relationship to the actual origin of the breeds;[4] the Balinese, Javanese, and Himalayan are all examples of this trend.

It is possible that Bone has bronchitis, bacterial or fungal pneumonia, a parasite, or cancer. Any of those things are possible. Since he seems to have improved on the antibiotics and steroid injection, it might be a good idea to have a recheck for him. Your veterinarian may want to recheck x-rays to compare for any improvement, and may be able to give him further treatment.
The Russian Blue is a robust breed, with firm muscles and an overall dose of good looks. It is physically in the same class as the Korat and Oriental Shorthair -- long, slender, elegant. It is of a medium size, and muscular, but compared to a swimmer in the compactness of its musculature. When it is in full motion and stretched out, one can see that it has a long, graceful neck, but the neck is hidden by thick fur and high set shoulder blades when the cat is sitting, making it look as though it has a short, thick neck.
I adopted my cat when she was eight weeks old, almost a year ago. She has always been frightened of other people, even the ones who live in my household. (This is slowly beginning to change) ever since I adopted her, her breathing has been very fast. Since it’s been so long, I don’t know if I should be worried more or less. Could it be a serious problem, or is it just something she does?
Thank you for your email. Unfortunately, without examining Bella, I'm not sure if she is having a problem or not. If her behavior seems off, and her breathing is more rapid, it is worth paying attention to, and if you can get her in to see your veteirnarian before the storm hits tomorrow it would probably be a good idea, to make sure she is okay. I hope that all goes well for her!

I adopted my cat when she was eight weeks old, almost a year ago. She has always been frightened of other people, even the ones who live in my household. (This is slowly beginning to change) ever since I adopted her, her breathing has been very fast. Since it’s been so long, I don’t know if I should be worried more or less. Could it be a serious problem, or is it just something she does?
Feeding tamed big cats raw fish, raw porkchops, raw beef or raw rabbit together in an enclosed space will activate love mode. They can either be fed it or it can be dropped next to them. After being fed and paired together, love hearts will show around the breeding pair, and after around 5–10 minutes, a cub (either the same type as one of the parents or a hybrid) will be produced and the naming screen will appear.
Thank you for your email. Since Tortie was just seen by your veterinarian and was deemed healthy, her periodic bouts of rapid breathing may be normal, and may follow bouts of exertion or anxiety. If the periods that she is breathing rapidly become more frequent, or more severe, it would be a good idea to have her seen by your veterinarian and examined to make sure that she is okay. It might be helpful to video the episode, since she doesn't seem to breathe that way when she is at an appointment. I hope that she is okay!
Treatment of rapid breathing in your cat will be tailored to the specific cause of the condition. In the case of infections, pneumonia, or fluid filling the lungs, your vet will prescribe strong antibiotics to help fight off the infections. In many cases, your cat may need to be hospitalized so that they can be provided round the clock supportive care such as fluids, IV antibiotics, and administration of oxygen.

Given the signs that you are describing for Millie, it would be best to have her seen by a veterinarian. She may have asthma, allergies, or another condition that requires treatment. Your veterinarian will be able to look at her, determine what might be going on, and recommend any testing or treatment that might be necessary. I hope that she is okay.

If you’re her favorite human, be ready for nonstop love, because she is all about you, you and more you. Feeling out of sorts? She’ll stick by your side, working her healing abilities on you until you’re up and at ’em again! Prepping dinner? She’ll chill by your side, acting as taste tester. Binge-watching a new TV show? She’ll curl up by your side — just have a comb handy, as she loves being brushed while watching the tube!


Hello there! My girlfriend and I have an exclusively outdoor cat who has recently shown some worrisome behavior. Typically, Simba is very independent. Only allows some human interaction when we feed him, and even then it's more like we have to sneak a pet here and there. About three days ago I came home and noticed his breathing was fairly rapid. I thought maybe he just came to our porch after some activity, so I mentioned it to my girlfriend in passing. Yesterday she called me at work worried. Simba was letting her pet him and even came into our garage (which is basically set up like a living room. There's a heater, ac unit, tv, carpets, etc.) It's very home-y. Anyway, he's been in the garage the past two nights since its been in the thirties at night time. He lays very still, breathes very rapid and heavy. I can hear, what I think is congestion as he breathes. He hasn't eaten or drank much. The only thing I have gotten to eat are a few cat treats. I read online we could give him a small dosage of benedryl. But I don't want to give him anything that would essentially hurt him. He also has random asthma like episodes. Wheezing and coughing with his mouth closed. He meows when we talk to him, or look at him. Part of me feels like he's asking for help! Unsure if whatever he has is life threatening or just a little kitty cold.

Thank you for your email. Since Tortie was just seen by your veterinarian and was deemed healthy, her periodic bouts of rapid breathing may be normal, and may follow bouts of exertion or anxiety. If the periods that she is breathing rapidly become more frequent, or more severe, it would be a good idea to have her seen by your veterinarian and examined to make sure that she is okay. It might be helpful to video the episode, since she doesn't seem to breathe that way when she is at an appointment. I hope that she is okay!
I was given an Enisyl-F Pump and have been administering that every 12 hours as instructed. The cause for my question, is two days later she has began breathing in the same manner that caused me to call the Vetenarian in the first place. It began for a good ten to twenty minutes and now she’s since stopped. I’m wondering is this normal or is it serious and if so should I take her back to the emergency Vet?
What's wrong with my poor gravy? My cat Gravy has become extremely affectionate today and has followed me outside 3x, where he never ever goes! He's following me like a shadow and meowing at me more than normal. He doesn't seem to be in any pain, but his breathing and change of demeanor have me concerned. He's breathing fairly rapidly thru his nose, and he is moving his tail a lot also acting maybe as if he is worried?
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